Chrissy Teigen Opens Up About Her Year-Long Battle with PostPartum Depression

1280_chrissy_teigen_luna_sweet_instagram

In a very candid essay, model and cookbook author Chrissy Teigen opens up for the first time about battling postpartum depression, a condition that affects 1 in 9 women, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

In the essay, the Lip Sync Battle co-host talks about being a very happy person and being genuinely ecstatic about starting a family with her husband John Legend. The couple welcomed daughter Luna in April 2016.


But then after her birth, she says she felt “unhappy: for “much of the last year.”

“What basically everyone around me—but me—knew up until December was this: I have postpartum depression. How can I feel this way when everything is so great? I’ve had a hard time coming to terms with that, and I hesitated to even talk about this, as everything becomes such a ‘thing.'” the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit cover model reveals before sharing that as a person who lives her life as an “open book” she felt compelled to share her story:

“I had such a wonderful, energetic pregnancy,” she begins but adds that things turned a bit dark because of disruption at home.

“After I had Luna, our home was under construction, so we lived in a rental home, then a hotel, and I blamed whatever stress or detachment or sadness I was feeling at that time on the fact that there were so many odd circumstances,” Teigen shared. “I remember thinking: ‘Maybe I’ll feel better when we have a home.'”But it didn’t go as expected though she shared how the show was very accommodating:

I went back to work on Lip Sync Battle in August, when Luna was four months. The show treated me incredibly well—they put a nursery in my dressing room and blew up photos of Luna and John and my family for my wall. When Luna was on set, they lowered the noise levels. They turned down the air so she wouldn’t be cold. Only the most gentle knocking on the door. Pump breaks. I mean, there was no better place to get to go back to work to.

Life wasn’t the same, nonetheless.

But I was different than before. Getting out of bed to get to set on time was painful. My lower back throbbed; my ­shoulders—even my wrists—hurt. I didn’t have an appetite. I would go two days without a bite of food, and you know how big of a deal food is for me. One thing that really got me was just how short I was with people.

I would be in my dressing room, sitting in a robe, getting hair and makeup done, and a crew member would knock on the door and ask: “Chrissy, do you know the lyrics to this song?” And I would lose it. Or “Chrissy, do you like these cat ears, or these panda hands?” And I’d be like: “Whatever you want. I don’t care.” They would leave. My eyes would well up and I would burst into tears. My makeup artist would pat them dry and give me a few minutes.

I couldn’t figure out why I was so unhappy. I blamed it on being tired and possibly growing out of the role: “Maybe I’m just not a goofy person anymore. Maybe I’m just supposed to be a mom.”

And the feeling transcended work and home:

When I wasn’t in the studio, I never left the house. I mean, never. Not even a tiptoe outside. I’d ask people who came inside why they were wet. Was it raining? How would I know—I had every shade closed. Most days were spent on the exact same spot on the couch and rarely would I muster up the energy to make it upstairs for bed. John would sleep on the couch with me, sometimes four nights in a row. I started keeping robes and comfy clothes in the pantry so I wouldn’t have to go upstairs when John went to work. There was a lot of spontaneous crying.

Read more of the very moving, open and transparent story at Glamour