Study: Antidepressant During Pregnancy Link to Autism Questioned

antidepressant in pregnancy linked to autism

Taking antidepressants during pregnancy does not increase the risk of autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, two new large studies suggest. Genetic or environmental influences, rather than prenatal exposure to the drugs, may have a greater influence on whether a child will develop these disorders. The studies are published online April 18 in JAMA.

Clinically, the message is “quite reassuring for practitioners and for mothers needing to make a decision about antidepressant use during pregnancy,” says psychiatrist Simone Vigodim, a coauthor of one of the studies. Past research has questioned the safety of expectant moms taking antidepressants


“A mother’s mood disturbances during pregnancy are a big public health issue — they impact the health of mothers and their children,” says Tim Oberlander, a developmental pediatrician at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. About one in 10 women develop a major depressive episode during pregnancy. “All treatment options should be explored. Nontreatment is never an option,” says Oberlander, who coauthored a commentary, also published in JAMA.

Untreated depression during pregnancy creates risks for the child, including poor fetal growth, preterm birth and developmental problems. Some women may benefit from psychotherapy alone. A more serious illness may require antidepressants. “Many of us have started to look at longer term child outcomes related to antidepressant exposure because mothers want to know about that in the decision-making process,” says Vigod, of Women’s College Hospital in Toronto.

Previous studies indicated that the use of antidepressants came with its own developmental risks:  autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, premature birth and poor fetal growth. “The key question is whether those risks are due to the actual medication,” says psychologist Brian D’Onofrio of Indiana University Bloomington. “Could the negative outcomes be due to the depression itself, or stress or genetic factors?” D’Onofrio and his group authored the other study.

continue reading

Child Experts Warn About At-Home High-Tech Infant Vital Signs Monitors

owletcare

Experts now warn that high-tech baby monitors that track infants vital signs as they sleep may do more harm than good.

Writing in the JAMA medical journal, child health experts at the University of Pennsylvania suggest these new trendy gadgets can trigger panic if they get the signs wrong.

“There is no evidence that consumer infant physiologic monitors are life-saving, and there is potential for harm if parents choose to use them,” the authors write.

A lot of these new devices will send alerts to the parents’ smartphone if there is a change in the baby’s breathing rate or pulse.

All they do is create ‘fear and self-doubt’ among the parents of healthy babies, doctors argue.

The most popular one is the “smart sock” like the Owlet with sensors sewn into the material.

They are pinned to a baby’s clothes or worn as a wristband – and some even come as a ‘smart sock’ with sensors sewn into the material and range in price from $100 to $250 dollars.

h/t Daily Mail