The Best and Worst States for Working Moms

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With Mother’s Day around the corner and more than 70 percent of moms with young children working today, the personal-finance website WalletHub conducted an in-depth analysis of 2017’s Best & Worst States for Working Moms.

In order to help ease the burden on “Women Who Work,” particularly moms, WalletHub’s analysts compared the attractiveness of each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia to a working mother based on 13 key metrics. The data set ranges from median women’s salary to female unemployment rate to day-care quality.


Best States for Working Moms Worst States for Working Moms
1 Vermont                42 Wyoming
2 Minnesota             43 West Virginia
3 New Jersey           44 New Mexico
4 Delaware               45 Idaho
5 Connecticut           46 Mississippi
6 Massachusetts      47 Alaska
7 Maine                  48 Arizona
8 Rhode Island         49 Nevada
9 New York               50 Louisiana
10 Illinois                  51 Alabama

Best vs. Worst
New York has the highest day-care quality score, 116, which is five times better than in Idaho, registering the lowest at 23.

Mississippi has the lowest child-care costs as a share of the median women’s salary, 9.87 percent, which is 2.7 times lower than in the District of Columbia, registering the highest at 26.70 percent.

The District of Columbia has the most pediatricians per 100,000 residents, 52.51, which is 28.2 times more than in Idaho, registering the fewest at 1.86.

South Dakota has the highest ratio of female executives to male executives, 79.39 percent, which is 3.1 times higher than in Utah, registering the lowest at 25.81 percent.

Maryland has the lowest share of single-mom families with children younger than 18 in poverty, 26.5 percent, which is 1.9 times lower than in Mississippi, registering the highest at 51.0 percent.

Virginia has the highest median women’s salary (adjusted for cost of living), $42,814, which is 1.9 times higher than in Hawaii, registering the lowest at $22,645.

North Dakota has the lowest female unemployment rate, 2.4 percent, which is 3.1 times lower than in the District of Columbia, registering the highest at 7.5 percent.

To view the full report and your state or the District’s rank, please visit:
https://wallethub.com/edu/best-states-for-working-moms/3565/

Is Your State among the Best or Worst for Working Moms?

Women making up roughly half of the American labor force and many of them are also working moms. To help working moms (and other women) assess how attractive the state they are living in is for women, WalletHub, the leading personal finance social network conducted an in-depth analysis of 2015’s Best & Worst States for Working Moms.
Using 12 key metrics such as median women’s salary, female unemployment rate and day care quality rankings, WalletHub analyzed the attractiveness of each of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia to a working mother.
Here is a summary of the rankings:
  Best States for Working Moms Worst States for Working Moms
  1 Vermont                                  42 Oklahoma
  2 Minnesota                          43 North Carolina
  3 Wisconsin                          44 West Virginia
  4 New Hampshire                  45 Georgia
  5 Massachusetts                          46 Arkansas
  6 Washington                          47 Nevada
  7 North Dakota                          48 Alabama
  8 Maine                                  49 Mississippi
  9 Virginia                                  50 South Carolina
  10 Ohio                                   51 Louisiana
Here are some other key stats and some interesting comparisons:
  • Day care quality is five times better in New York than in Idaho. 
  • Child care costs (adjusted for the median woman’s salary) are two times higher in the District of Columbia than in Tennessee.
  • Pediatric services are 12 times more accessible in Vermont than in New Mexico.
  • The ratio of female to male executives is three times higher in Alabama than in Utah.
  • The percentage of single-mom families in poverty is two times higher in Mississippi than in Alaska.
  • The median women’s salary (adjusted for cost of living) is two times higher in Virginia than in Hawaii.
  • The female unemployment rate is four times higher in Nevada than in North Dakota.

For the full report and to see where your state ranks, check out the report HEREpost signature