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Njeri Kimani

10 Tips for Parenting Pre-teens

It’s typically between the ages of nine and twelve that our cute, cuddly little children, once so willing to climb into our laps and share their secrets, suddenly want little or nothing to do with us. A child in preadolescence is not the same person he was just a year or two ago. 

EXCERPT:

4. Don’t be overly judgmental. “At this age your children are watching you very astutely to hear how judgmental you are,” advises Dr. Steiner-Adair. “They are taking their cues on how you talk about other people’s children, especially children that get into trouble — how that girl dresses, or that boy has good manners or bad manners. And they are watching and deciding whether you are harsh or critical or judgmental.”

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7 Things to Consider When Buying a Stroller

Purchasing a stroller can be intimidating; there are so many options, so many features, and such a large price range.

Once you know how and when you’ll be using your new stroller, make sure you decide what features best fit your lifestyle. Use the seven questions below to help you decide what features are must-haves.

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How to avoid the dinner time battle with their children?

Still, there are some gentle ways parents can nudge their kids toward more healthful eating habits. Here are a few thoughts from nationally known nutrition experts on how to get kids to go from being picky eaters to people with sound, varied diets:

  • Avoid a mealtime power struggle. One of the surest ways to win the battle but lose the war is to engage in a power struggle with your child over food, says Jody Johnston Pawel, LSW, CFLE, author of The Parent’s Toolshop. With power struggles, you’re saying, “Do it because I’m the parent” and that’s a rationale that won’t work for long, she says. But if your child understands the why behind the rules, those values can lay the groundwork for a lifetime of sound food choices.

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Activities for Kids on Sick Days

If your kid’s running a fever, vomited or had diarrhea in the past 24 hours, or seems lethargic and just not himself, plan to stay home and play nurse. Here’s how to also have some fun with your patient.

With younger kids: Break out the photo album. Tired of the same book? Your child will end up “reading” family pics to you—“Look, das Gwamma!” or “I met Santa!” Bonus: He may even be content to sit and peruse them on his own.

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6 Ways to Adapt Your Birth Plan During the Pandemic

Developing a birth plan is important for pregnant women to share their concerns, fears and get information about labor, birth and postpartum procedures. 

Here are 6 ways you can adapt your birth plan during the pandemic:

  1. Choosing Your Hospital

Look into a hospital’s birth protocol. Here are questions to ask before registering with them:

  • Are patients allowed birth partners?
  • Who can visit?
  • What happens if you test positive for COVID-19?
  • What happens if my baby and I get complications?
  • What has changed with regards to hospital operations?
  • Will I be discharged early? If so, what support is in place for follow-ups?
  • What should I pack in my hospital bag?

Inquire if your partner is allowed to stay with you through birth and during the postpartum process and what provisions they have for that.

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7 tips for keeping kids warm in freezing cold weather

Here’s a breakdown of the tips from Children’s Health about how to keep babies and kids warm when it’s freezing:

1. Layer up! Dress your baby in multiple layers and don’t forget a hat and socks.

“Parents should keep in mind that infants do not self-regulate their body temperatures well, which puts them more at risk for getting hypothermia,” Hu said. “As a rule of thumb, infants should be in one more layer than what parents are wearing.”

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