Loading...
Browsing Tag

children

Keep Your Kids Learning Through the Summer

No student remembers every single thing she learns in school. Even over the course of a school day, many things will go in a child’s ear and out the other. And as any parent who is active in the educational process knows, kids are wildly inconsistent with their learning. They learn some things with little effort, while other things require endless repetition and instruction.
In any case, it is only natural for some of the things a child learns during the school year to be lost during those three to four summer months. Much that is lost will be
reiterated in subsequent school years, but other lost knowledge might go away and never come back if the information is not kept fresh.
That is where parents come in. You are not required to essentially give your child summer school. Summer is supposed to be a time for children to play and experience the world. But there are things you can do to make sure what your child has learned does not go away. And in the process, you can also help them learn new things.
Encouraging summer reading
The last thing your child is going to want to do during the summer is read the types of books used in school curriculums, but there is nothing wrong with encouraging your child to read widely and often, and even to read some books intended to be educational.
While books read in the summer will not necessarily pertain directly to the subjects your child covered during the school year, well-chosen books will build upon your child’s existing knowledge and internalize it in the process.
The best practice for encouraging this sort of summer reading is to make it an everyday routine. Just as you probably had a homework routine during the school year, in the summer you can set a time in the evening that is devoted solely to books and other learning activities. You can even take the weekends off, if that routine works well for you.
Active learning
Another way to build on your child’s previous school year is to engage in outdoor activities that related directly to things your child has learned in the past year. But you do not have to worry about having an exact correspondence between school learning and summer learning. Just try to engage in things that your child will enjoy while also learning things. Wilderness hikes and visits to the zoo are perfect examples.
Visiting the library
Over time, it is only natural for the collection of books you have at home to become boring, and your child will reach a point when they are no longer learning from those books. That is why it is a good idea to visit the library regularly, both for reading time at the library and to check out books to read at home. Though technology is changing the way young people engage with books, libraries are still warm and welcoming places where children can be exposed to a wide variety of subjects and imaginary worlds.
Activities
During the summer, also make sure to sign your child up for activities. Physical activities such as sports are very healthy and productive, and children actually learn a lot from them, but you can also take classes, go to one-time events, and take your child to day camp (and of course, there are also sleepaway camps for children who are old enough). As long as your child remains active and continues engaging in new learning activities, he or she will continue making educational leaps forward during these important months.
Lisa Pecos contributes regularly to The Parenting Journals. She is a believer in natural medicine, and thinks that gripe water is an essential item for any new parent.

post signature

Share |

Trend: Punishing teens by shaming them virally in Social Media

Recently, a video of a mother in the Caribbean twin island nation of Trinidad and Tobago beating her 12-year old daughter went viral. It sparked much debate and online conversation about whether corporal punishment is necessary to discipline teens and whether such discipline should be broadcast to the world to see.
That type of  video is not new, however:

  • In Flint, Michigan this month, three adults were arrested after a video of them beating, slapping and yelling at an 11-year old boy was posted on Facebook. The mom’s boyfriend shot the video and posted it to shame the boy for pretending to be a gang member and having bad grades.
  • Last month, a mother recorded her husband beating their 13-year old daughter with a belt after she went missing for 3 days and the girl’s Facebook page revealed she was spending time with boys. The video, shown on World Star Hip Hop, got over 350,000 views.
  • In 2012, a video of a sick mother beating her baby garnered close to 2 million views. Online petitions caused Malaysian police to arrest the woman.
  • Also in 2012, a former official in California was sentenced and is serving three years probation after a neighbor shot the man, Anthony Sanchez, beating up his stepson while teaching him to catch a baseball. The neighbor posted the video on YouTube.
  • That year as well, petitions from online directed a judge to make a decision in a custody over a couple’s daughter after a video of abuse with the mom beating the on went viral and got over 330,000 views on YouTube.

It’s not always the parents posting the videos either.

  • There is the high profile case of  Hillary Adams, a daughter of a judge William Adams, who in 2011 posted a video she recorded in 2004 of her dad beating her. She posted the video on Reddit saying the world should see that he is unfit for the bench. The video got 7.6 million views. Judge Adams lost his judicial election.
Non Violent Shaming 
And beyond videos, we’ve seen the images with teens holding shaming signs their parents make them hold on street corners with some of them circulated on line. Some parents are forcing their kids to hold signs and posting them online to teach their teens a lesson about how dangerous social media is and how fast an image can circulate world wide.

  • Last fall, a California mom made her 11-year old daughter wear a sign and stand on a busy street corner for twerking at a school dance.
  • Last January, a photo of a dad standing next to his daughter with a photo of himself on the front and the words, “Try me”, went viral on Reddit. The dad made his daughter wear the shirt around school for a week as punishment for breaking curfew.
  • There is also that 2012 YouTube video of a dad shooting his daughter’s laptop after she posted things about him on Facebook.
  • Also, in 2012, an Ohio mom changed her daughter’s Facebook cover and profile so the words superimposed on it said, “I do not know how to keep my mouth shut. I am no longer allowed on Facebook or my phone. Please ask why, my mom says I have to answer everyone that asks.” 
  • In August 2012, a South Carolina man mom made her son stand on a street corner with a body placard that read, “”Smoked pot, got caught! Don’t I look cool? Not!” and “Learn from me, don’t do drugs.” 
  •  A Florida teacher was fired  in 2012 after she put dog “cone-of-shame” collars around the necks of tardy students and some of the kids posted the images on Facebook.
  •  In November 2012, Florida parents of a 16-year old made her stand on a street corner with the sign  “I sneak boys in at 3 AM and disrespect my parents and grandparents.”
All of these are attempts from parents to curb teen drinking, sexual activity, bullying or disrespect. Supporters of these shaming methods say that parents and caretakers have few options with unruly teens. 
Many defenders of online shaming point to the fact that they were beaten as a kid and they turned out fine but they leave out the part that no-one saw their beating, especially not a half a million people.  Nonetheless, they also assume the shaming will work.
Shaming doesn’t work
Nonetheless, history proves that these public humiliation punishments don’t always work.
In 2011, a teen boy who was beaten by his uncle in a viral video was later shot and killed in a gang-related incident.  The mom said her son was bullied and teased a lot after the video went viral.
“I regret maybe not being a part of his life a little bit more after the video,” the uncle said after his nephew Michael Taylor was killed.
Clearly, the online beaten didn’t sway Taylor from continuing down that path he was going in anyway, and without more intervention and care, a beating may not be the end of bad behavior. In fact, the viral videos may foster more negative outcome than good.
When kids compare extreme punishments to those their peers receive for similar offenses, they might feel singled out and treated unfairly by their parents, which can create feelings of resentment and damage the relationship, a NannyWebsites post states. This could lead to further acting out, which results in a no-win power struggle.
“Teaching kids to be respectful includes treating them with respect,” says Annie Fox, M.Ed., teen/tween expert and parenting author o” Teaching Kids to be Good People”.  “Disrespect is a boomerang.”
Shaming could leave a mark on the teen’s self-esteem and add to depression, anxiety or isolation. A child could feel personally rejected by their own support system, giving them the sense that no one is in their corner and that they lack self-worth. Add to that the potential that the embarrassing punishment itself could lead to teasing and bullying within the child’s social circle and it might very well result in a dangerously alienated young person.
In sum, many of the bad acts the kids are being punished for were known by a relatively small number of people and broadcasting it on the internet lets potentially millions more know. Where is the value in shaming a kid for life for one small lesson, especially when there is no guarantee that it will work?
post signature