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Exercising in the Summer: 5 Ways to Beat the Heat

With the weather trending on the warmer side, you might find that your workouts are beginning to be a little harder to get through. In fact, anyone exercising in the heat runs the risk of experiencing heat stroke, caused by prolonged exposure to high temperatures.  
Luckily, there are a few tricks to help you beat the heat so you don’t have to miss an opportunity to get your workout in.
1. Plain H20 isn’t enough
Hotter temps mean you’re going to be sweating more. Sweating more means expelling precious minerals, namely sodium and potassium. When this happens, drinking water isn’t enough. Drink a sports drink that also contains carbohydrates like Gatorade 1-2 hours before you head out the door. If it’s a shorter run, a cross-training session or a dance class, add a low-calorie electrolyte mix like Nuun or Ignite Naturals Refresh to your water.   This way you aren’t cancelling out the calories you drink with what you burn during your workout.
2. Exercise at the coolest time
It’s a no brainer that the hottest part of the day is the afternoon. If you’re going to exercise in the heat, get outside during the morning before 10 A.M. or in the evening after 6 P.M. If there’s no way to avoid a mid-day walk or jog, then try to find a shaded path or trail.  If you’re body is particularly sensitive, then just head straight to an air-conditioned gym. Exercising should be enjoyable and not stressful.  When it comes to extreme conditions, listen to your body and take the proper precautions to protect it.
3. Layer on the sunscreen.
Sunburns still energy from your body.  Make sure to thoroughly apply sunscreen before you head out the door to ensure that your muscles are doing the work, not your skin. Go the extra mile and throw on a visor or hat to protect your face.  
4. Throw on some shades
Squinting and contracting the muscles of your face can actually take a lot of energy.  Wear sunglasses to prevent squinting and the distraction of having impaired vision. You’ll be more comfortable during those miles or minutes if you don’t have your face scrunched up the entire time.
5. Cool your pulse points
Your pulse points are locations where your blood vessels are close to the skin. Placing a cold compress on your neck, temples and wrists can help to cool the temperature of the blood nearest the skin, which circulates cooler blood throughout the body, lowering the body temperature.  If you’re going to be working out in the heat, chill out with a cold, wet towel around your neck and wrists before heading out the door. If you’re doing interval work, hill repeats, or an activity that provides breaks, bring a frozen bottle of water with you and splash cold water on your pulse points during your rest periods to keep your temperature from rising with the effort. 

Youth Sports Safety Month: 6 Kids’ Sports Safety Tips

April is Youth Sports Safety Month. Sports can have a tremendously positive impact on kids’

lives.  A positive experience in sports

can benefit a child not only physically, but socially and emotionally.  Sadly our current youth sports system is

leading to a number of preventable injuries. 

In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), more than 3.5 million children under 14

receive medical treatment for sports injuries each year.  When it comes to high school athletes, they

are clocking in 2 million injuries a year.
Keep your young athlete safe, healthy and happy with these top six youth sports safety tips tips from the experts at personal coaching company, CoachUp
1. Health, Sleep and Nutrition.  Set your child up for a long, healthy career

in sports by making sure they are eating a balanced diet and are sleeping

regularly.  Always have your child’s

annual physical up-to-date and be diligent with following up on their doctor’s

orders, especially for children with conditions like diabetes.  Never hesitate to bring your child to their

doctor if they are experience pain or feeling ill.
2. Concussion and TBI Awareness.  Make sure both you and your athlete are aware

of the symptoms of traumatic brain injuries, as well as, the long term impacts

of such an injury.  When in doubt, refer

to the guidelines outlined by the CDC and remember to bring your child to a

medical professional immediately if you suspect your child might have sustained

a TBI.
3. Hydration and Heat Related Illness Awareness. Your child

should always be properly hydrated before participating in any physical

activity. Especially if your child’s sport is rigorous or performed in elevated

temperatures, both you and your athlete should be aware of the symptoms of heat

related illnesses such heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
4. Strength, Conditioning and Flexibility Programs.  Particularly for middle to high school

athletes, a well-rounded training program is vital for preventing common

overuse injuries. Your athlete should be diligent about following the strength

and conditioning, and flexibility programs their coach prescribes. Your athlete

might need some extra support with regard accommodations for existing

conditions or injuries or just reviewing proper form, so consider enlisting the

help for a private to work more closely with your child.
5. Sports Performance Stress Management.  As your athlete begins to compete they will

become introduced to the stresses of sports performance.  You can help your athlete by making your home

a stress-free environment and offering your emotional support.  If you think your child is becoming unhealthy

stressed, address the problem with their coach to determine the next best steps

to reduce their anxiety.
6. Rest. Never underestimate the power of rest, whether

that  is a nap, a day off from practice

or a short term break from the sport. Burnout is a very common problem with

young athletes so it  is important to

foster a nurturing relationship with your athlete so they feel comfortable

approaching you if they need a break.

Following these tips will help ensure that your athlete will

have a long-lasting career and positive experience in sports for years to come.