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Study: Few Older Women Who Freeze Eggs Actually Use Them Later

Fewer than 10 percent of older women who freeze some of their eggs as insurance against age-related declines in fertility eventually use them to try to get pregnant, new research shows.

The study included 563 women who had eggs frozen between 2009 and 2017 at a large European fertility center. On average, the women were 36 years old.

Only 7.6 percent of those women have returned to thaw their eggs and try to get pregnant, according to the study. Of those, only one-third have succeeded.

The study was presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE), in Barcelona, Spain.

Most of the women who did not return to thaw their eggs had found a partner with whom to pursue motherhood, according to study author Michel De Vos, of the Brussels Center for Reproductive Medicine in Belgium.

He said that a growing number of older women in the United States and Europe are having their eggs frozen, but those over age 35 need to have realistic expectations.

“Egg quality declines markedly with age, and success rates will be lower than 33 percent in women freezing their eggs beyond this age,” he said in an ESHRE news release.

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7 Facts About Stress and Infertility

While stress is not a cause of infertility, research has shown that high levels of longstanding stress can significantly impact the ability to conceive during infertility treatment. The positive news is that by decreasing stress, couples can experience higher fertility potential as well as healthier and happier well being.
 “Many couples don’t realize how much stress impacts health and fertility potential,” explains Dr. Jennifer Hirshfeld-Cytron of Fertility Centers of Illinois. “Stress is one of the fastest variables to change in the body, and taking proactive action through yoga, psychotherapy, meditation and potentially acupunture is not only beneficial, but enjoyable.”
Hirshfeld-Cytron and Beth Heller (M.S., R.Y.T.) of Pulling Down the Moon will be discussing the controversial link between stress and infertility and how to take control of your well-being in the free webinar Yoga, Meditation, and Conception on June 11th at 7 p.m. CDT (register here).  The duo offers seven facts about stress and infertility.
1.    Stress does not cause infertility. Unfortunately, infertility can cause stress. A study in the journal, Human Reproduction, found that 30 percent of women seeking infertility treatment have depression and anxiety.
2.    High levels of stress can double the risk of infertility. A recent scientific study found that women whose enzyme alpha-amylase levels, a stress-related substance, were in the highest third had more than double the risk of infertility
3.    Stress affects the reproductive potential of the male and female body. Stress can lengthen the amount of time required to become pregnant, negatively impact semen quality, decrease the success of fertility treatment, and cause depression and anxiety.
4.    Reducing stress is good for the body and mind. Taking positive action to reduce stress through mindfulness-based activities has been shown to reduce blood pressure, decrease anxiety, lower depression, enhance a positive mindset, calm the mind, improve sleep, and help overall wellbeing.
5.    Consistent stress-reducing activities can aid in pregnancy. A study from Fertility and Sterility found that women who underwent a 10-week stress management program while undergoing IVF treatment had a 52 percent pregnancy rate compared to a 20 percent pregnancy rate in the control group.


6.    Yoga can reduce stress and boost pregnancy. Yoga has been shown to be effective in the treatment of depression as well as decrease inflammatory response to stress events. During a six-week Yoga for Fertility class at Pulling Down the Moon where participants learned yoga poses specific to reproductive function, breathing and medication instruction and group discussion, participants experienced significantly decreased anxiety as measured by the State-Trait inventory.


7.    Psychological treatment can improve emotional symptoms and lower stress. Receiving support, whether in a group or individual setting with a psychologist, has been shown to be important and effective stress management. Treatment can improve mood, decrease anxiety and depression, and positively impact pregnancy rates during fertility treatment. Mindfulness training programs also give helpful tools for relaxation and increased peace of mind, which can ease the stress of fertility treatment and prove a valuable life skill.

Stay stress-free!

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Sofia Vergara said she froze her eggs for future baby (VIDEO)

Last week, singer and The Game actress Brandy Norwood told Queen Latifah she planned to freeze her eggs for a baby in the future.
And on this anniversary today of the tragic Boston bombings, we are reminded that it was last year around this time that Modern Family  actress described the process of freezing her eggs in an interview on Good Morning America.
Vergara, who is currently 41 and dating a guy who is three years younger than she is and who never had a child said last year she wanted to preserve the opportunity to bear him a child. 
“I just wanted to plan ahead,” Vergara told ABC News of the possibility of more children. 
“I have my son, Manolo,” she said of her 21-year old son from a previous marriage who was studying in Boston at the time of the incident. “It’s not an emergency for me to have another kid, but for Nicky, he’s never had a baby.”
She admitted to consulting a fertility specialist. 
“Nothing happens that naturally anymore,” she said of her options for having more kids at her age. “I wanted to take advantage of science. Why not?”
She added, “I wanted to make sure I already froze my eggs. I wanted to take advantage of science,” adding, “I took them out already. They’re in the refrigerators. Hopefully, they’ll be fresh by the time I use them.”
Watch the clip:



ABC US News | ABC Business News



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