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sports and kids

Youth Sports Safety Month: 6 Kids’ Sports Safety Tips

April is Youth Sports Safety Month. Sports can have a tremendously positive impact on kids’

lives.  A positive experience in sports

can benefit a child not only physically, but socially and emotionally.  Sadly our current youth sports system is

leading to a number of preventable injuries. 

In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), more than 3.5 million children under 14

receive medical treatment for sports injuries each year.  When it comes to high school athletes, they

are clocking in 2 million injuries a year.
Keep your young athlete safe, healthy and happy with these top six youth sports safety tips tips from the experts at personal coaching company, CoachUp
1. Health, Sleep and Nutrition.  Set your child up for a long, healthy career

in sports by making sure they are eating a balanced diet and are sleeping

regularly.  Always have your child’s

annual physical up-to-date and be diligent with following up on their doctor’s

orders, especially for children with conditions like diabetes.  Never hesitate to bring your child to their

doctor if they are experience pain or feeling ill.
2. Concussion and TBI Awareness.  Make sure both you and your athlete are aware

of the symptoms of traumatic brain injuries, as well as, the long term impacts

of such an injury.  When in doubt, refer

to the guidelines outlined by the CDC and remember to bring your child to a

medical professional immediately if you suspect your child might have sustained

a TBI.
3. Hydration and Heat Related Illness Awareness. Your child

should always be properly hydrated before participating in any physical

activity. Especially if your child’s sport is rigorous or performed in elevated

temperatures, both you and your athlete should be aware of the symptoms of heat

related illnesses such heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
4. Strength, Conditioning and Flexibility Programs.  Particularly for middle to high school

athletes, a well-rounded training program is vital for preventing common

overuse injuries. Your athlete should be diligent about following the strength

and conditioning, and flexibility programs their coach prescribes. Your athlete

might need some extra support with regard accommodations for existing

conditions or injuries or just reviewing proper form, so consider enlisting the

help for a private to work more closely with your child.
5. Sports Performance Stress Management.  As your athlete begins to compete they will

become introduced to the stresses of sports performance.  You can help your athlete by making your home

a stress-free environment and offering your emotional support.  If you think your child is becoming unhealthy

stressed, address the problem with their coach to determine the next best steps

to reduce their anxiety.
6. Rest. Never underestimate the power of rest, whether

that  is a nap, a day off from practice

or a short term break from the sport. Burnout is a very common problem with

young athletes so it  is important to

foster a nurturing relationship with your athlete so they feel comfortable

approaching you if they need a break.

Following these tips will help ensure that your athlete will

have a long-lasting career and positive experience in sports for years to come.