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10 Things to be Mindful of when Teaching Your Child to Swim

Bellyitch Rewind  

 

Passing on our hard-earned knowledge to our children is one of the greatest parts of being a parent or a caregiver. For many, teaching the skill of swimming is one of the most challenging and rewarding of those tasks. One of the best ways to prevent drowning is to simply ensure that children have basic swimming skills and knowledge, though it’s certainly not the only water safety measure required.

Here are ten things to keep in mind when you’re teaching children to swim:

1. Be Patient – One of the best ways to ensure that a child has an aversion to the water and never wants to swim again is to become frustrated at them during the teaching process. Swimming should be fun and exciting, not stressful.

2. Don’t Push Scared Kids – Some kids are more comfortable in the water than others; those that aren’t big fans may take longer to learn than their more enthusiastic counterparts. Don’t push nervous little ones to learn faster or punish them for showing signs of fear.

3. One Thing at a Time – Whether kids are toddlers or school-aged, it’s best to focus on one task at a time. Blow bubbles until that skill is mastered, then move on to kicking while holding on to something stationary. When they have one step down, then – and only then – it is time to move on to the next.

4. Keep Lessons Short – During a day at the pool, try to break lessons down into one or two half-hour increments, while the rest of the time is devoted to play. Throwing too much instructional information at them can be overwhelming, and they may not retain anything.

5. Make Sure That Lessons Are Age-Appropriate – A two-year-old might have more trouble mastering the back-float than a first-grader, so try to keep your child’s age and physical development level in mind when you’re teaching.

6. Avoid Unrealistic Expectations – It’s quite unlikely that your little one is going to emerge from their first lesson as an Olympic medalist, so keep your expectations at a realistic level. Some kids may pick up quickly and others may need more time; it’s important to avoid shaming comparisons.

7. Tailor Your Approach to Your Child’s Individual Needs – A kid with no fear of the water and a strong sense of athleticism and independence will require a very different teaching method than her timid, less-developed sibling. Tailoring your methods to each of their individual needs will work best for everyone.

8. Floaties or No Floaties? – Some parents believe that inflatable “floaties” will help their child to become acclimated to the water, while others believe that they create a false sense of security and prevent kids from learning proper form. When making your decision, it’s also important to remember that a child who is accustomed to floaties will have to be weaned from them, similar to training wheels on a bicycle. Kids who never use them won’t have that dependency to break.

9. Remember That Putting Your Face in the Water is Scary – Especially for very young children, submerging completely, or even putting their face into the water, can be downright terrifying at first. This aversion is usually overcome in a relatively short amount of time, but being prepared for it can help to stave off parental frustration.

10. Start Acclimating Early – Even if you’re only playing games and swaying in the water, an infant who is used to being exposed to the water is likely to transition into swimming lessons much more easily than kids with no prior experience.

Good luck, parents!

Celeb wellness expert’s 3 Last-minute Healthy #Halloween Tricks

Halloween is tomorrow and if your child is one of the 6 million affected with a food allergy or other restriction, the festivities could end up on a sour note.
To make Halloween a safe and fun experience for everyone, safe and healthy from wellness expert Shanna Israel offers 3 go-to tips families: 
Trick #1: Outfit your Kids & Paint your Pumpkins
The best way to keep your kids safe is to take precautions, making sure that others know your child, or your house, is a gluten or peanut-free environment.

  • Take part in the Teal Pumpkin Project and paint a teal pumpkin for your stoop. This is becoming 2014’s universal sign that your house is “safe” for those with a dietary restriction.
  • Outfit your child in a medical ID bracelet to highlight their medical conditions upfront. Companies like Hope Paige design some really cute ones for kids

 Trick #2: Update your candy bowl
The candy bowl can be a nightmare for parents with kids suffering from an allergy. Some simple tricks to help those with allergies stay safe are:

  • Create two candy bowls, clearly marked which candy has specific ingredients, such as peanuts or tree nuts, and which is safe for kids. Make sure you ask about allergies before you let them dig in
  • Just because it’s Halloween doesn’t mean you need to provide unhealthy treats! Sticking to dark chocolate is a simple swap, or try to incorporate healthier treats like KIND bars or small packages of trail mix. Still tasty treats kids will like and parents will thank you!

Trick #3: Health-ify your Halloween dishes
Halloween parties or get-togethers are quite common this weekend, so come prepared with a tasty treat that’s both healthy & delicious! Some tips for those with dietary restrictions to successfully navigate the Halloween parties:
Celeb wellness expert Shanna Israel

  • Bring your own dish: Not only will it ensure you have something to eat, but it’s a great way to provide the host with a gift and demonstrate to party goers that healthy can be delicious, too!
  • Expand your recipe book: Especially around Halloween, you can experiment with fun, spooky dishes that incorporate veggies, superfoods like pumpkin and candies without the sugar, calories or other artificial sweeteners.

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