VIRAL BBC Interview: Read These 15+ ‘I’m Not the Nanny” Essays from Moms of Color

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This week, South Korea expert Robert E. Kelly‘s BBC on air segment went viral as he was discussing the recent impeachment of that nation’s president Live when his two daughters burst into the room where he was Skyping his interview.

The Pusan National University political science professor’s wife, Jung-a Kim, shut it down when she burst into the room, ninja style, ducking low, but making a ton of noise and dragged the kids out of the room. Many work-at-home parents can relate.


It is hilarious (You can catch it HERE).

One of the by-products of the video is the discussion among members of the public and  the media who assumed that Kelly’s Korean wife was the nanny, not the mom of the two racially-ambiguous kids.

While one could understand the presumption of many, given the trend of interracial marriages, it shouldn’t be too much of a stretch to assume the woman was the mom.

The number of mixed-race babies has soared over the past decade, new census data show, a result of more interracial couples and a cultural shift in how many parents identify their children in a multiracial society.  In fact, more than 7 percent of the 3.5 million children born in the year before the 2010 Census were of two or more races, up from barely 5 percent a decade earlier. The number of children born to black and white couples and to Asian and white couples almost doubled.
Victoria Rowell wrote in her autobirography that her nurse refused to give her blonde hair blue eye baby to her after birth before triple checking.

Young & Restless actress Victoria Rowell wrote in her autobiography that her nurse refused to give her blonde hair blue eye baby to her after birth before triple checking.

In light of the recent video with Kelly, there have been a few summaries and think pieces on the unconscious bias and micro-aggression many women of color around the world endure when they are asked by well-meaning people what agency they work for or if they are the mom to their own children.

This is not one.

I have several friends who are married to men of European decent who have children that are very fair and have physical features that are also quite European-looking. I have a few blogger friends as well who have penned pieces on the topic and I’ve written about one from the DC area,  Thien-Kim Lam, whose entire blog is actually titled, “I”m Not the Nanny”.

Because this topic is new to a lot of folks who cannot imagine these women’s perspective, I curated 14 Blogs and Interviews with over 15 women of color giving their first-hand personal essays on this topic. Check them out:

No, I’m Not the Nanny, He’s Really my Son, Stacy-Ann Gooden, Weather Anchor Mama

I’m Not the Nanny — Darker Mom, Lighter Baby, Angela Gray, Huffington Post

No, I’m not the nanny: When you don’t look like your kids, reporting by Pamela Sitt, TODAY Moms

Nope! I’m Not the Nanny, Just a Black Mom, Thanks, Nicole Blades, Jezebel

I’m Not the Nanny: Multiracial Families and Colorism, Allyson Hobbs review of Lori Tharps’ book, New York Times

I’m Not the Nanny, Collection, What to Expect.com

No, I’m Not the Nanny, Jennifer Borget, BabyMakingMachine

My Daughter, I’m Not her Nanny, C. Fleming, The Race Card Project

I’m her Mom, Not the Nanny, Rose Arce, CNN

No, I’m Not the Nanny, Paloma Thomas, The Gal-Dem.com

No, I’m Not the Nanny, Sage Steele, People

No, I’m Not their Nanny, Vivienne Lewis, Chronicles of a Young Mother

Please Stop Asking me If I’m the Nanny, Oriana Branon, Scary Mommy

Here is a young white mom who is mistaken for being the nanny of her biracial son in the Upper West Side of New York.

No, I’m Not the Nanny, Allison, Motherhood Project NYC

Finally, my journalist friend Jamila Bey  and a multiracial San Diego native Phaedra Erring who each are parents to blonde haired blue eyed kids, and New York Times Motherlode blogger Lisa Belkin were interviewed by NPR.

Also on this interview is Carolyn Hall who is a white woman who has two African adopted kids and a bi-racial child with her Jamaican-American husband, who is given harsh looks while out with her African kids because people assume wrongly she “stole” them from her husband’a previous relationship.

. Listen to their stories:

10 Things You Don’t Do Once You Become a Busy Mom (VIDEO

borget

TV broadcaster, blogger and part time professional photographer chronicled her journey to accepting motherhood and now, as a mom of two, continues to entertain, edify and connect with her audience, including other moms each week on her award-winning blog, Baby Making Machine.

I was a reader of her blog in the early years and even featured her a few times on Bellyitch in the past. I really enjoy her candid, honest and transparent blog posts about life as a working mom, including the challenges of being in an interracial relationship and practicing an often misunderstood religion, Mormonism.


Borget is also a vlogger and is a genius with the camera. I recently bumped into a fun partner post she did with Blue Apron titled, 10 Things I Aint Got Time to Do Since Becoming a Mom. It’s delightful as I could relate to several items on the list. Take a look and see if you can relate:

Yay! Bellyitch is a Healthline Top 15 Best Pregnancy Blog of 2016

we won

I’m honored and proud that Bellyitch was named among the Top 15 Best Pregnancy Blogs of 2016 by Healthline, the fastest growing consumer health information site — with 65 million monthly visitors and over 20 million health communities on Facebook, and offices in San Francisco and New York City.

 


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About the blog, Healthine wrote:

Bellyitch is like the People magazine of pregnancy blogs. You’ll find celebrity news and fashion, personal stories, and tips and tricks for new and expecting parents. We like the mixture of content, giveaways, and product reviews. It’s got just the right amount of useful information, mixed with tantalizing celebrity gossip.

* gush *

And we are in great company! I am friends with fellow top 15 blogger Jennifer Broget from Baby Making Machine since way before she had any kids. I also read her blog regularly. I subscribe to Pregnant Chicken.  Blogger Amy from that site is a hoot! She has the best sense of humor around.  Cafe Stir usually has the most unique and interesting stories. Very entertaining site! Fit Pregnancy has a plethora of wonderful lifestyle information for moms-to-be and parents in general.  Celebrity Baby Scoop has been with us in the “bumpwatch” biz from the earlies.  It is another wonderful source for bumpwatch news. The other winners are great too and I plan to check them out as well.

I want to shout out our team of writers, contributors, editors, social media managers and others who’ve worked on the blog over the years.

Thanks for the honor, Healthline. I think this is the 5th year on the list! We are going to wear our badge proudly. Check it out:

pregnancy best blogs badge
Healthline

How to Take a DSLR Camera Selfie with Kids using Jennifer Borget’s Photography Hack

want to know

We talked about the importance of moms getting on the other side of the camera and being part of the moments they capture of their children’s lives. Modern smartphones have self-timers but if you have fidgety children and/or are working with an actual camera or a DSLR camera, you’re going to need to be more resourceful.

One of our longtime fave mom bloggers Jennifer Borget of The Baby Making Machine did an excellent video showing parents how to take selfies with their children using an app, their smartphone and a very clever hack!


Check out the video here:

10 Baby Milestones to Capture on Video

baby milestones

 

My old blogging friend Jennifer Borget of the phenomenal Baby Making Machine  blog just released a super cute video explaining which 10 baby milestones new parents should try to capture on video during their baby’s first year of life.


They include: 1. first day; 2. crying; 3. laughing; 4. crawling; walking and other milestones.

Check out her adorable video featuring moments with her very own daughter and son.