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Gymboree

Stock Up On Baby & Kids Stuff with Gymboree’s $2.99 Warehouse Sale

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Our friends at Gymboree asked us to share with you that it is having a massive warehouse sale and is offering markdowns as low as $2.99.

This means our readers will find accessories $2.99 and up, tees and tops $4.99 and up, pants $4.99 and up, and sleepwear $8.99 and up.

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It may be a great time to stock up on stuff for next winter. [Remember to anticipate how much your baby or kids will grow by then]; and to get some deals for this upcoming Spring.

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Gymboree makes pretty top notched clothing with quality stitching and long lasting material and fabric that does not fade in the wash, shrink or otherwise become too tattered and worn after a few washing.

There’s even some Valentine’s Day Stuff!  GET TO SHOPPING!

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Hope you can take advantage of some deals!

This Very Smart, Savvy Mom Consignment Shopping Secret in MD just got BIGGER – HUGE!

 

 

Okay. This luxury baby products consignment extravaganza hosted in Maryland twice each year has to be one of the most innovative things around!

The schtick: Get savvy, sophisticated, smart and eco-conscious moms who love and value quality designer clothes, baby goods and products together to upcycle items they and their children no longer use and fit and earn some extra cash in the process.

And for those who don’t have much to sell  or are brand new moms or mega shoppers, invite them to come shop for FREE and stock up on durable top brand merchandise and gently-worn clothing for their brood at a tiny fraction of the cost of buying new!

That’s the idea behind Wee-Sale of Maryland which is going on this weekend. The organizers outgrew one of their old locations and have decided this fall to combine their Anne Arundel, Charles and Prince George’s County sales they host each year into one mega sale at the Wayne Curry Sports and Learning Complex in Hyattsville, Maryland.

“If you loved any of our sales in the past, this mega sale promises to be the best yet ,” said Mimi Shea, founder of the Wee-Sale. “We simply outgrew our old locations and are thrilled to now work in the most spacious of venues yet! The Sport and Learning Complex is ideal to display the thousands of kids/baby items our consignors bring season after season. It is centrally located for most of our past consignors and shoppers and we hope to add some new fans of the Wee-Sale too! We are so very excited about the Wee-MEGA-Sale!!”

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Gymboree, Baby Gap, Ralph Lauren, Janie and Jack, Wheat, Peg Perego, Graco, Fisher Price, Pottery Barn Kids, a wide array of boutique fashions and much more to fit newborns to kids size 16 – all will be available.

And, I love the fact it has a New Mom day for brand spanking new moms or those who have recently adopted a baby. For $10, they get to come a day ahead of the 4-public days and shop first.  Sadly, space for that day is already sold out this year, but isn’t it a great concept?

Those who donate must give a minimum of 30 items to sell but with no max, tho there are max limits for clothing for space purposes. The hosts keep 45% of the sales but those who donate clothes can earn a higher commission on their items by volunteering!

So, for example, if you work three 4-hour shifts, you can keep 70% of your sales and get chances to shop early yourself.

It’s a super ingenious way to staff the event without having to incur added overhead costs of hiring sales staff.

And it pays. The creators say the average consignor pockets about $250 in cash. Sweet!

But what if you’ve got too much going on and don’t have time to sort, wash, prep and price your stuff? Don’t sweat it!

You can pay a $30 drop off fee and give up a small percentage of your consignment commission to a “Busy Mom” associate who will do all that for you! So smart!

At the end of the weekend, all unsold merchandise get donated to charity so it’s a win-win-win situation!

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Public sale hours are Thursday and Friday, Sept. 24-25 from 9 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sept.26 from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. (25 percent off day) and Sunday, Sept.27 from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. (half-off day). Admission and parking are free. Due to safety concerns with a high volume of shoppers on opening day, no children are allowed at the sale on Thursday, Sept. 24.

The Fall Wee-Sale will take place Sept. 24-27 at the Prince George’s Sports and Learning Complex in Hyattsville, MD. More than 800 consignors will bring over 80,000 items and 75,000 square-feet worth of children’s clothing.

How rich parents can be friendlier than middle class ones

I had the fortunate privilege of attending the US Open

Finals this year (and last) riding the coat tails of one of my friends who is

an avid tennis fan and who secures plum tickets each year.
After this year’s tournament,  I was having an online conversation with

friends, and one pal mentioned how she will be taking her daughter there

regularly, taking note at how friendly everyone was there.
I agreed.  If you were

to guage by all the anti-rich sentiments that circulate in progressive political

circles, you’d think wealthy people were the worst type of people on earth.
But those attending the US Open were/ are usually overwhelmingly

affluent and with sponsors like Rolex, Mercedes Benz, and Ralph Lauren‘s Polo it’s no wonder

as those brands have studied and know the demographic.
The online exchange reminded me of the time I realized that

I sometimes prefer meeting new rich friends than middle class and upper middle class

ones.
 I know it sounds

shallow but if you think about it, rich people are stereotyped to be snooty,

snobby and perceived to always be looking down on others.  

Those in the lower and middle socioeconomic class are thought

by many to be more compassionate and caring for their fellow man.
My experience has in at least one social experience was the opposite.  
After I had my first child in 2002, I was working at an

international law firm at the time and was blessed to have had 6 months paid maternity

leave – virtually unheard of in the US.
I had loads of time on my hands. Back then, the national play

and learn centers Gymboree gave away one free visit for each location.
So each week, I would schedule first time visits and would pack

up my newborn and go visit  all the

Gymboree centers around the DC Metropolitan area to see which one was the best

fit. There were about 4 or 5 of them.
At each center, my baby boy and I would be joining an

already existing class session or one that had just started.  We would have to reach out to friend other

parents and babies there.  Each session

started with a few minutes of free unstructured play,  then parents got a chance to formally introduce

themselves and their baby during the formal circle play time. After it, we’d

have a few moments of free play again during the hour to 2 hour play sessions.  This is when you’d schedule play dates outside

of class or just try to make new friends, generally.
I immediately noticed a pattern.
At the centers that were located in middle to upper middle

class neighborhoods , I found the moms (and dads sometimes) weren’t too open

and friendly. They would look at me and turn their heads and not necessarily

respond to my friendly hand or smile to connect. They’d stick to chatting with

the friends they already knew. Bummer.
Only during the formal circle times, if we were asked to

share where we worked or what we did for a living, I discovered that once some

of these parents learned I was an attorney and then working at a major law

firm, that only then would they start speaking and would gravitate over to me

and my baby. Curious.
That was not the case in the super affluent areas, at the centers

where every SUV parked out front was of some supreme luxury brand.  My experience was that the moms were generous

and open and welcoming from the beginning. I didn’t get a feeling of judgment

or sizing up to determine if I was worthy of getting to know better.
I figured it out quickly.
They simply could afford to be friendly. Many of the moms

were married to very rich men and therefore, in some respects, had reached the pinnacle

of financial success anyway and therefore were done their social climbing. They

didn’t need to feel that adding you as a friend would be adding a new person to

compete with.

They also no longer had to only socialize with those who were

worthy of being in the same circle or could be an asset or connection to the

next rung in the socio economic ladder they were clawing ferociously to the top to summit.

Further, if race was a factor, they, more likely, had

wealthy friends of various races and therefore did not assume that a black

woman, for example  wouldn’t have access

to a network they could tap into and therefore not worth getting to know more.
Certainly, these are broad generalizations and do not apply

to all wealthy or all middle class people as I 

know the opposite can be said from members of each class.
Just in my casual observation and experience the social

climbers are more likely to have tight cliques and circles and are not keen on letting

new friends penetrate through.

Like one of my favorite rappers, Drake, sings, “No new

friends.” 
photo: courtesy Coursehorse

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