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Happy Days

Emmy: Congrats to Shocked Winners Thandie Newton and Regina King

The Primetime Emmy Awards went down last night and in lieu of Red Carpet coverage, I’m posting to give a shout out to two of my Bellyitch Bumpwatch alums who won and were visibly shocked about it too: Thandie Newton and Regina King

Newton won for Best Actress, Drama, for her role on Westworld. During her acceptance speech, Newton wished her daughter a happy birthday, accidentally dropped the F-bomb, and then Thanked God…even though she might be an atheist.

“I don’t even believe in god but I’m going to thank her tonight,” said Newton.

Another fave, actress, producer and director Regina King looked shocked when she was announced as the winner of the Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie for the TV show she brought to the little screen, Seven Seconds, about a woman whose son is killed in a cycling accident by a police officer, the cover up and the effect of the scandal on a little town.

King had previously won two Emmys in that category for her  work in ABC’s American Crime in 2016.

Watch her acceptance speech:

Not a mom, but I was a watcher and fan of the 1970s/early 80s show Happy Days, and so I was happy to see The Fonz, aka, Henry Winkler win his first ever Emmy Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series for Barry at the age of 72.
The amazing moment came 42 years after he was first nominated for his role on Happy Days.

“I only have 37 seconds; I wrote this 43 years ago,” said Winkler, who has been nominated six times in his illustrious career. “Skip Brittenham said to me a long time ago, ‘If you stay at the table long enough, the chips come to you,” and tonight I got to clear the table.”

Yay! Congrats!

We Are Experiencing The Rise of the ‘Bully Moms’

bad-moms

Women may be stereotyped as “catty” but the truth of the matter is, generally, we sometimes are most judgmental of one another and often, we do, in fact, prey on each other’s insecurities. We then use them to impose and dictate our standards onto other women and shame them when they don’t measure up.

I’m guilty of this for sure.

Moms do this too.

Heck, the Mommy Wars is all about Judgy Judy McJudsons, and in fact, a recent survey of millennial moms reveal that 80 percent of them have been shamed by other moms. le sigh

Getting bullied and made to feel inadequate by the popular girls and cliques was supposed to end at high school graduation, right?

Women talking at baby shower

But it doesn’t.

In a new piece by Anne Roderique Jones in MarieClaire published today, Jones describes the “Bully Moms” (also the title of the article”) who are fueled by  social media and pop culture.

I love how Jones starts:

You can’t identify a mean mom by her Birkin bag or her lycra Lululemons. She comes in all sizes and socio-economic classes and lives in no specific zip code, rearing her head in the heartland, crunchy California, the Deep South, New York City. But you know a mean mom when you meet one: She criticizes your parenting style, calls you out on Facebook, or slathers you in snark. These are the mean girls, all grown up and blossomed into adult bullies with kids of their own. You’ve probably encountered a few at your local playground. Hell, maybe you are one.

The author then goes on to perfectly explain the evolution of “Keeping up With the Jones” from the perfect TV families to Reality TV wives and beyond:

I hesitate to blame pop culture for the mom-on-mom hate, but life does imitates art. Our parents’ generation grew up watching scripted sitcoms with impeccably behaved children (The Brady Bunch, Happy Days) and modeled their own actions accordingly. But as our entertainment appetites evolved, so did the way we treat each other … Girls who watched ‘The Simple Life’ as teens in the mid-aughts are now moms hooked on ‘The Real Housewives.’

In a world dominated by Pinterest and Instagram, is being a mother (which women have been doing since the beginning of time, mind you) starting to become an endless race towards perfection, lest you get called out for being anything less? Do we all have to keep up with the clever birth announcements, the gender reveal parties, the elaborate maternity shoots, the professional post-birth shots in the hospital ward? I recently came across a post in my feed of a beautiful blonde woman wearing an off-the-shoulder shirt with #MomLife scrolled in gold letters across the front. It’s all a perfectly curated existence, this motherhood thing.

 Maybe moms today—with the pressure to be selfie-level beautiful, to cook Instagram-worthy (organic) meals, to plan lavish playdates, and to maintain a career so they can, in many cases, not just contribute to their household but be the breadwinner or even the sole source of income—are just too damn exhausted.

Fascinating and sadly accurate!

Head on over to MarieClaire.com and digest the rest.