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Mayo Clinic

Here is How to Reheat Breast milk the Right Way

Bellyitch Rewind

The World Health Organization asserts that “breast milk is the ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants,” encouraging new mothers to exclusively breastfeed their babies for the first six months of life. When new moms work outside of the home, however, many opt to pump and store their breast milk so that nannies and other childcare providers can continue providing their child with the most nutritious possible food source during this crucial time.

These caregivers who are not the mom are are then tasked with the responsibility of properly handling the bottled breast milk, and understanding the best methods for storage.

Breast Milk Storage Information for Nursing Mothers

The La Leche League International, a leading breastfeeding advocacy group, suggests that breast milk be stored in two to four ounce amounts in order to minimize waste by either freezing or refrigeration. While frozen milk remains fresh for up to six months in a deep freezer, refrigerated milk used within eight days retains more of its original anti-ineffective properties.

Human breast milk that has been pumped can be stored at room temperature for up to six hours safely, but mothers are advised to refrigerate or chill their milk as soon as possible after pumping. Containers made of glass or hard plastic free from bisphenol A (BPA) with tight-fitting tops are ideal for storage after being washed in hot, soapy water and allowed to air dry after being thoroughly rinsed. There are also specially-designed freezer bags commercially available, though traditional food-storage bags aren’t recommended due to the possibility of rupture or leakage. Containers designated for freezer storage should not be filled to the brim, as the milk will expand as it solidifies.

Containers of pumped milk should be dated in order to facilitate use of older milk first, with the child’s name also included on the label if the pumped breast milk is intended for use in a daycare setting.

Preparation and Handling Information for Childcare Providers

Before handling stored breast milk to prepare a bottle, nannies and childcare providers should carefully and thoroughly wash their hands to prevent contamination. Frozen milk may be thawed either in the refrigerator or by immersing the container in warm water; using a microwave to either thaw or heat the breast milk is strongly discouraged. This method can both destroy valuable nutrient content and create hot spots in the bottle that can scald the delicate tissues of an infant’s mouth. Bottles microwaved for too long may also explode under intense heat, wasting the milk and creating quite a mess.

Once breast milk has been thawed, it should never be re-frozen. Bottles that a baby doesn’t finish should be discarded, rather than saved; the risk of contamination is very real, despite the antibiotic nature of expressed human breast milk. For this reason, nursing mothers are urged to store milk in two to four ounce containers to minimize waste. Frozen milk should be kept near the back of the freezer, because the temperature tends to be the most constant in this area.

Human breast milk can vary in color and consistency depending on the nursing mother’s diet, so color isn’t typically an indicator of freshness. The Mayo Clinic also reports that breast milk that has been frozen and later thawed may have a different consistency, color, and odor than freshly pumped milk. Additionally, breast milk can often separate into two distinct layers of milk and cream; this separation is also not an indication that milk isn’t fresh. To reincorporate the milk and cream, simply shake the storage container gently or swirl it carefully until it’s combined again.

Breast milk can be warmed for feeding by placing the bottle in a bowl of warm water, or in a pan of water that has been heated but is not sitting on the stove. Test the temperature of milk before feeding it to their small charges to prevent burns and scalds due to overheated bottles. Commercially-available bottle warmers may also be effective tools, though microwave ovens are, once again, strongly discouraged.

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Study: With Tech, Low Risk Pregnancies Equal Less OB Visits

The Mayo Clinic in Minnesota is giving low-risk pregnant women the option of fewer checkups by providing equipment that allows them to monitor their blood pressure, fetal heart rate and other medical conditions at home.

Women involved in the OB Nest program have eight clinic visits, Minnesota Public Radio reported . The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says the standard pregnancy visit schedule entails more than a dozen appointments.

Women enrolled in the program can contact a nurse online or by phone if they see abnormal results or have questions or concerns. The program began in 2016.

The program gives doctors and midwives more time to tend to patients with high-risk pregnancies, said Dr. Yvonne Butler Tobah, a Mayo obstetrician and health sciences researcher.

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How To Properly Store and ReHeat Breastmilk

The World Health Organization asserts that “breast milk is the ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants,” encouraging new mothers to exclusively breastfeed their babies for the first six months of life. When new moms work outside of the home, however, many opt to pump and store their breast milk so that nannies and other childcare providers can continue providing their child with the most nutritious possible food source during this crucial time. These nannies are then tasked with the responsibility of properly handling the bottled breast milk, and understanding the best methods for storage.

Breast Milk Storage Information for Nursing Mothers

The La Leche League International, a leading breastfeeding advocacy group, suggests that breast milk be stored in two to four ounce amounts in order to minimize waste by either freezing or refrigeration. While frozen milk remains fresh for up to six months in a deep freezer, refrigerated milk used within eight days retains more of its original anti-ineffective properties.

Human breast milk that has been pumped can be stored at room temperature for up to six hours safely, but mothers are advised to refrigerate or chill their milk as soon as possible after pumping. Containers made of glass or hard plastic free from bisphenol A (BPA) with tight-fitting tops are ideal for storage after being washed in hot, soapy water and allowed to air dry after being thoroughly rinsed. There are also specially-designed freezer bags commercially available, though traditional food-storage bags aren’t recommended due to the possibility of rupture or leakage. Containers designated for freezer storage should not be filled to the brim, as the milk will expand as it solidifies.

Containers of pumped milk should be dated in order to facilitate use of older milk first, with the child’s name also included on the label if the pumped breast milk is intended for use in a daycare setting.

Preparation and Handling Information for Childcare Providers

Before handling stored breast milk to prepare a bottle, nannies and childcare providers should carefully and thoroughly wash their hands to prevent contamination. Frozen milk may be thawed either in the refrigerator or by immersing the container in warm water; using a microwave to either thaw or heat the breast milk is strongly discouraged. This method can both destroy valuable nutrient content and create hot spots in the bottle that can scald the delicate tissues of an infant’s mouth. Bottles microwaved for too long may also explode under intense heat, wasting the milk and creating quite a mess.

Once breast milk has been thawed, it should never be re-frozen. Bottles that a baby doesn’t finish should be discarded, rather than saved; the risk of contamination is very real, despite the antibiotic nature of expressed human breast milk. For this reason, nursing mothers are urged to store milk in two to four ounce containers to minimize waste. Frozen milk should be kept near the back of the freezer, because the temperature tends to be the most constant in this area.

Human breast milk can vary in color and consistency depending on the nursing mother’s diet, so color isn’t typically an indicator of freshness. The Mayo Clinic also reports that breast milk that has been frozen and later thawed may have a different consistency, color, and odor than freshly pumped milk. Additionally, breast milk can often separate into two distinct layers of milk and cream; this separation is also not an indication that milk isn’t fresh. To reincorporate the milk and cream, simply shake the storage container gently or swirl it carefully until it’s combined again.

Breast milk can be warmed for feeding by placing the bottle in a bowl of warm water, or in a pan of water that has been heated but is not sitting on the stove. Test the temperature of milk before feeding it to their small charges to prevent burns and scalds due to overheated bottles. Commercially-available bottle warmers may also be effective tools, though microwave ovens are, once again, strongly discouraged.

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How DO pregnancy tests work? (VIDEO)

How do pregnancy tests work    Tien Nguyen   YouTube

In the TED-Ed video lesson, “How do pregnancy tests work?Tien Nguyen explains how each modern pregnancy test is able to tell if you’re pregnant within minutes. The concept of the modern pregnancy test started in 1963 when a small study reproduced the ancient Egyptian pregnancy test, where women would urinate on wheat and barley seeds and wait to see if they sprouted. If wheat sprouted faster, they believed it was a girl, but if barley, a boy. The 1963 study was able to predict pregnancy with a 70 percent accuracy rate, although it can’t reliably tell the sex of the baby.

Although many home pregnancy tests claim to be accurate as early as the first day of a missed period or even before, says the Mayo Clinic, it’s best to wait until one week after a missed period. OTC pregnancy tests are all designed to do one thing, detect a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), which is produced in the earliest stages of pregnancy and tells the body not to shed the inner lining of the uterus that month. The hormone enters the bloodstream and urine when it begins production in the placenta, and increases rapidly every two to three days.

The over-the-counter (OTC) pregnancy test begins when urine is applied to the exposed end of the strip as the fluid travels up the absorbent fibers that will cross three separate zones. The first zone, the reaction zone, is where the y-shaped proteins called antibodies — they contain a handy enzyme with the ability to turn on dye molecules — will latch onto any HCG.

The urine then picks up all the AB1 enzymes and carries them to the test zone, where the results show up. This type of test is known as the sandwich assay. If HCG is present, it gets sandwiched between the AB1 enzyme and AB2 and sticks to the test zone, allowing the attached dye-activating enzyme to create a visible pattern. If there’s no HCG, the wave of urine and enzymes just passes on by.

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See a video that Nguyen presented with his talk:

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Ciara poses with Easter Bunny with darker hair, About pregnant women and hair dye myth

Instagram/Ciara
Mom-to-be Ciara posted pics on Easter Sunday of herself posing up with a giant Easter bunny and another after getting ice cream on the holiday.
The photo also revealed that she has gone back to her original darker hair color. It also reminds us of an old wives tail about pregnant women and hair dye. There is a prevailing thought, which may be based on fear and myth, that dye may impact negatively on a growing baby.
It’s not entirely accurate that chemicals in hair dye and other hair products that alter the color or texture of the hair may penetrate your skin cells and infiltrate the fetus.
Dr. Roger W. Harms wrote for the Mayo Clinic site about dying your hair when pregnant, “when you use hair dye, a small amount of the dye may penetrate your skin. Generally, however, the dye isn’t thought to pose harm to a developing baby.
“Few studies have examined women’s use of hair dye before and during pregnancy, “he said. “A 2005 study suggested an association between hair dye and pregnancy and the childhood cancer neuroblastoma — but other studies haven’t reached the same conclusion. Most researchers say it’s unlikely that maternal use of hair products before or during pregnancy would increase the risk of childhood brain tumors.”
The good doctor has suggested that those concerned should talk to their health care provider, who may or may not  suggest postponing any chemical hair treatments.
The Food and Drug Administration recommends for any person, pregnant or not, using hair dyes to:

  • Wear gloves when applying hair dye.
  • Apply hair dye as quickly as possible.
  • Rinse your scalp thoroughly after using hair dye.

For African American and Latina women who sometimes use chemical treatments to texturize, relax or soften their hair, similar precaution can be taken.  Many women when they become pregnant avoid relaxers and switch to wearing braided hairstyles.  The fear there too is the lye in the chemicals may somehow impact their growing fetus.
The styling consists of braiding or twisting their own natural hair or twisting in extensions that match their natural hair texture. 
In the end, women should do what’s best for them and within the guidelines of their OB or midwife.

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