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parenting teens

10 Rights and Responsibilities for Parents of Teens.

When it comes to discipline, parenting experts focus on the things that change for parents when their child begins adolescence. This is because teens start to form their identities and need more independence. Therefore, a parent’s job changes from being the person in charge all of the time to being more of a monitor and advisor.

As you notice your parenting job changing, it may seem like your rights and responsibilities as a parent also change. It’s true, some rights and responsibilities do shift over to your teen. This gives them more freedom to make their own decisions and be more independent. However, there are some that will remain consistent throughout your child’s adolescence.

Parental Rights and Responsibilities

Let’s review ten of the most important rights and responsibilities for parents of teenagers.

To Be Treated With Respect

Parents, along with everyone else in the family, have the right to be treated with respect. This includes not only parents and teens, but also siblings and extended family members who may be living in the home.

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3 Ways to Change Your Parenting in the Teenage Years

“Wow. Ugh. That’s amazing!”

This is the usual wide-eyed response when people hear that I have four teenagers. Sometimes people grimace, like the mere thought of it is a bitter pill. They are thinking, I know, that teenagers are hard, which, of course, they can be. Everyone assumes I must be insanely busy, or maybe just a little insane, and that raising four teenagers must be nearly impossible.

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10 Tips for Parenting Pre-teens

It’s typically between the ages of nine and twelve that our cute, cuddly little children, once so willing to climb into our laps and share their secrets, suddenly want little or nothing to do with us. A child in preadolescence is not the same person he was just a year or two ago. 

EXCERPT:

4. Don’t be overly judgmental. “At this age your children are watching you very astutely to hear how judgmental you are,” advises Dr. Steiner-Adair. “They are taking their cues on how you talk about other people’s children, especially children that get into trouble — how that girl dresses, or that boy has good manners or bad manners. And they are watching and deciding whether you are harsh or critical or judgmental.”

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