Loading...
Browsing Tag

research

Study: Taking antidepressants during pregnancy risks baby’s lungs

Taking certain antidepressants in late pregnancy more than doubles the odds of a lung complication in newborns, a new review says.
Fortunately, the study also found that the absolute risk of the complication — known as persistent pulmonary hypertension — was still low, affecting about 3.5 out of every 1,000 births, according to study author Dr. Sophie Grigoriadis.
“Women taking these medications in pregnancy should not panic. The risk is still quite low. It should be one of the factors you consider when you decide to use medications, but it has to be balanced with the potential problems that can occur if you don’t treat depression,” said Grigoriadis, head of the Women’s Mood and Anxiety Clinic: Reproductive Transitions at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, in Toronto.
Deciding how to treat depression during pregnancy can be difficult, the study noted. The benefits of antidepressants have to be weighed against potential harms, and compared to the potential risks of untreated depression.
Untreated depression in a pregnant woman can lead to unhealthy eating habits, poor weight gain, high blood pressure, inadequate prenatal care and possible drug and alcohol abuse, according to the March of Dimes.
Read more

post signature

Study: Vitamin D supplements in pregnancy linked to strong baby muscles

Researchers have suggested that babies are likely to have stronger muscles if their mothers had a higher level of vitamin D in their body while they are pregnant.

In the research vitamin D levels were measured in 678 mothers in the later stages of pregnancy.

When the children were four years old, grip strength and muscle mass were measured. Results showed that the higher the levels of vitamin D in the mother, the higher the grip strength of the child, with an additional, but less pronounced association between mother’s vitamin D and child’s muscle mass.

Lead researcher Dr Nicholas Harvey, Senior Lecturer at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (MRC LEU) at the University of Southampton said that these associations between maternal vitamin D and offspring muscle strength may well have consequences for later health; muscle strength peaks in young adulthood before declining in older age and low grip strength in adulthood has been associated with poor health outcomes including diabetes, falls and fractures.

continue reading

post signature