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STUDY: Colorado reports weed effects on kids whose mom’s smoked while pregnant

The state of Colorado released a comprehensive 188-page report today about the health effects of smoking marijuana which also included its impact on infants.
According to the study, marijuana usage by pregnant women is associated with negative effects on children including decreased academic ability, cognitive function and attention.
The report noted that the symptoms may not appear until the baby’s adolescence yet can be directly linked to his mom’s pot smoking.
Read more from the full report HERE!

h/t  9News

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Study: Napping helps babies retain knowledge

Taking naps after learning new information may help increase a baby’s memory, a new study suggests.
The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is based on tests of six- and 12-month-old babies to see how they retained memories, using a puppet with a removable mitten attached to a bell. Researchers repeated a sequence of actions using the contraption, several times, before the infants took naps of varying lengths.
Those who took naps that lasted longer than 30 minutes were more likely to remember how the device worked than babies who napped for only short periods after the lesson, the New York Times reported. Sleeping has long been tied to improving memory among humans. A recent study by researchers in Montreal found that children who get a good night’s sleep perform better in math and languages. So it makes sense that the benefits of sleep would also help infants.
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Photo credit: demandaj / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

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Study: Men lose testosterone during partner’s pregnancy

It used to be that once a woman became pregnant, her husband’s job was basically done. Besides helping her through the pregnancy, as any proper man would, he remained the same physically, emotionally, and biologically. Now, we know things are a little different. Some research has shown men’s hormone levels change with the birth of a baby, but according to a new study from the University of Michigan, these changes may occur before the baby’s even born.
“Our findings suggest these changes may begin… during the transition to fatherhood,” said study author Dr. Robin Edelstein, from the university’s Department of Psychology, in a press release. The study was published in the American Journal of Human Biology.
Edelstein and her team conducted four tests on the saliva of 29 couples expecting their first babies. The tests took place throughout the pregnancy period, at 12, 20, 28, and 36 weeks. The team was specifically looking at levels of testosterone, cortisol (the stress hormone), estradiol (a form of estrogen), and progesterone (another female hormone). They found that as pregnancy progressed, all four hormone levels increased in women, however, in men, both cortisol and progesterone levels remained the same while estradiol and testosterone levels decreased.
“We don’t know yet exactly why men’s hormones are changing,” Edelstein said. “These changes could be a function of physiological changes that men experience as they prepare to become fathers, changes in their romantic relationships, or even physical changes that men experience along with their pregnant partners.”  

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Study: Babies respond more to moms than dads, but you can fix that dads

New research indicates that babies learn language more from their moms than their dads, and that moms react and respond more to a baby’s cues than dads.
A report in the journal Pediatrics analyzed a group of 33 babies monitored with a small recording device called LENA attached to a vest researchers wore on them just after they were born, while in the hospital and again at 44 weeks and 7-months old.  With over 3,000 hours of recordings, the researchers found that “when babies made sounds, moms were more likely to respond to them verbally than fathers were — “Oooo, sweetie pie, you’re talking this morning, ” Time  summarized.
The report also discovered that mothers responded 88% to 94% of the time to the babies vocalizations, while dads responded only 27% to 33% of the time.

As a result, and  perhaps because the babies were used to hearing their mom talk to them more, both boys and girls were also more likely to respond to their mothers’ or female voices than they were to male voices.

Dang dads, even strange random women beat your voice!
But you dads can change all that, the study suggest, by simply talking to your babies more and perhaps doing so in a higher pitched sing song-y way that moms do and pairing your talking with eye contacts as moms tend to do.
Give it a try and report back, kay? 

Good luck!

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Study: Eating fried chicken daily increases gestational diabetes risk

Women who eat fried food every day are nearly twice as likely to develop diabetes during pregnancy, according to a major study.
Those who regularly enjoy chips, an omelette or fried chicken are at much higher risk of gestational diabetes – a temporary condition that affects up to one in 20 expectant mothers.
Researchers at Harvard University in the US believe that frying releases harmful chemicals into food which affect how the body controls blood sugar.
Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnant women fail to produce enough insulin causing their blood sugar to become abnormally high.
If not detected and treated, it can lead to a premature birth, the baby being very large or at worst dying shortly after labour.
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Study: Low iron intake in pregnancy linked to autism

A new study by UC-Davis researchers found a five-fold increase in autism spectrum disorder in children born to mothers with low iron intake and some metabolic conditions.
“Iron deficiency and its resultant anemia is the most common nutrient deficiency … affecting 40 to 50% of women and their infants,” said Rebecca Schmidt, assistant professor at the UC-Davis Department of Public Health Sciences and a MIND Institute researcher, in a written statement.
“Iron is crucial to early brain development, contributing to neurotransmitter production, myelination and immune function,” Schmidt said. “All three of these pathways have been associated with autism.”
Research has been conducted previously on the link between autism and mother’s intake of folic acid, but this research is the first to look at iron intake as a possible contributor, Schmidt said. UC-Davis’ MIND Institute — Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders — is a collaborative international research center examining causes and treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. 
The study is expected to be published online this week by the American Journal of Epidemiology.
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Study: Toddlers learn words differently as they age

A new study found that toddlers learn words differently as they age, and can only learn but so many new ones each day.
This new University of Missouri research provides insight as to how children process information to learn new words as they move through the preschool years, according to a press release about the findings.
“We found that babies’ abilities to accurately guess the meaning of new words increases between 18 and 30 months of age, and by 24 to 36 months, toddlers are able to accurately guess the meanings of new words at a significantly higher level,” Judith Goodman, an associate professor in the MU School of Health Professions and chair of the Department of Communication Science and Disorders said. “Interestingly, we observed that even from the time children mature from 18 to 30 months of age, the cues toddlers use to learn new words change.”
Researchers taught children, who ranged in age from 18 to 36 months,  six new words using three types of cues, taking note of children’s ability to accurately guess what the words meant.
“When children were presented with a new word and asked to choose between an item for which they already had a name and an unfamiliar object, they appropriately assigned the new word to the unfamiliar object, and this ability improved as children aged,” Goodman said. “The toddlers’ ability to infer a word’s meaning from linguistic context, such as figuring out that a ‘kiwi’ must be a food item when they hear, ‘Sammy eats the kiwi,’ also improved as the children aged. However, using social cues, such as eye gaze, became less effective as the children matured. By 36 months of age, children were less likely to assume a word referred to the particular object a speaker was looking at – looking at a kiwi when teaching the child the word ‘kiwi’ – than younger children were.”
Goodman also found that a limit exists as to how many words toddlers can retain. A day after the children learned the six words, the researchers tested whether the children remembered the words. The children better remembered the first three words they had learned the first day, Goodman said.
Children who are struggling with learning language may benefit from being presented with specific cues, Goodman said. Additionally, the research reinforces the importance of providing children with rich word-learning environments, in which toddlers are exposed to many words and are provided with a variety of cues to help them learn and remember those words and what they represent, Goodman said.
“When you’re working with young children who are learning language, it’s important to talk to them all the time and label everything in their environments,” Goodman said. “At home, parents can name household items or foods the children are eating. If out on an excursion, such as a trip to the zoo, parents can label the animals they see.”
The study, “The Type, but Not the Amount, of Information Available Influences Toddlers’ Fast Mapping and Retention of New Words,” was published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Kathryn Brady, an assistant professor at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, was the first author on the paper, which was based on her dissertation research completed at MU. The research was supported in part by the Student Research Grant in Early Childhood Language Acquisition from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation.

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10 Celebrities who got busted Cheating via Texting

Recently, reports surfaced that Hollywood Exes star Andrea Kelly (1) divorced her husband Brian McKee of two months after she discovered inappropriate texts between him and several of his exes. A couple of weeks ago, the interwebs went gaga over Phaedra Parks’ (2) reading of her show nemesis Kenya Moore who for two seasons milked inappropriate text messages she had exhanged with Parks’ husband Apollo Nida.
They are the latest in celebrity break ups or scandals over texting. Reese Witherspoon (3) divorced Ryan Phillippe shortly after discovering text messages between him and his mistress Abbie Cornish. Similarly, Sandra Bullock (4)  discovered hubby Jesse James‘ text messages with Michelle McGhee; Shaunie O’Neal (5) discovered Shaquille O’Neal texts with longtime girlfriend Vanessa Lopez; Eva Longoria (6)  discovered beau Tony Parker‘s sexting with teammate Brent Barry‘s wife Erin Barry; David Duchony (7) discovered  wife Tea Leoni (8) was sexting with Billy Bob Thornton; Love and Hip Hop Erica Mena (9)  broke off her engagement with then fiance Lil Scrappy after finding explicit text messages with another woman; and porn star Ginger Lee released explicit text messages sent from former Congressman Anthony Weiner (10) while married to Huma Abedin. 
A recent survey from Victoria Milan discovered that the majority of American cheaters (83%) connected with their lovers via their mobile phones. 
Most of the 3,500 members of the company that facilitate extramarital affairs for members said they used WhatsApp, Faceboo or Twitter (56%) followed by  Mobile text messages and phone calls on their mobile phones followed. 
Most of the cheaters surveyed use their normal telephone number to reach their lovers, but 11% have another “secret SIM card” for keeping their lover secret. And 69% have a contract instead of using prepaid cards even though it is inherently riskier given that their bill provides a complete record of everyone they have contacted via phone and text each month.

Dirty. Dirty.

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Study: Babies with stressed moms cry more

Anxious mothers are more likely to have babies who cry for longer, according to latest research.
Women who experience stress, worry or panic attacks before becoming pregnant are more than twice as likely to report that their child cried ‘excessively’.
It is not known why this link exists, but researchers said mothers suffering from anxiety may have a more ‘intrusive’ parenting style that could cause babies to cry more

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Study: Your smart phone may be a danger to your fetus

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Radiation from wireless devices  pose risk to children and fetuses, a recent  report in the Journal of Microscopy and Ultrastructure  states.
Children and fetuses are most susceptible to neurological and biological damage that result from microwave radiation emitting from wireless devices, the report says. 
The paper, titled “Why children absorb more microwave radiation than adults: The consequences,” discusses how microwave radiation can cause degeneration of the  protective myelin sheath that surrounds brain neurons in fetuses, in particular. 
The authors suggest parents ban wireless toys from children to minimize potential risk, noting also that prolonged exposure may be linked to brain tumor exposure. 
Extensive research document the non-thermal biological effects from long-term exposures, and while worldwide, governments  have been issued warnings, the public is largely unaware.
“Pregnant women deserve to know that wireless radiation can have an impact on the developing brain,” 
Pediatric neurologist Dr. Maya Shetreat-Klein stated while launching the Baby Safe Project in New York this June.. “We’re seeing alarming increases in the number of children diagnosed with neurological disorders over the past decade, and anything we can do that might help reduce that rate should be taken very seriously.” 
This study conflicts with prior research claiming that pregnant women should not need to worry about exposing their baby’s to cell phone radiation.
Smartphones, cell phones, tablets and laptops have recommendations warning users to keep the away from their body. The conclusions seem extreme. The authors, doctors from a multinational Environmental Health Trust,  recommend children not play with wireless toys at all, and warn teen girls from storing their smart phones in their bras or hijabs. 

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