Loading...
Browsing Tag

TODAY Parents

Viral: Mom Cries When Panic Buyers Clean Out Diaper Shelves

empty shelves

empty shelves

Utah mom Lauren Whitney was having a tough week when she went to her local Walmart to get diapers for her 18-month-old daughter, Rosalynd. But when she got to the aisle, there was nothing left in Rosalynd’s size.

It was just too much for the mom of four to take.

“So basically I’ve just had like a really rough week,” Whitney told TODAY Parents. “I was demoted at work for a really stupid reason, and it just kinda created stress. I went to a few other stores first. I ended up at Walmart and I was just looking for diapers…and there was just none in her size anywhere. And I think it was the straw that broke the camel’s back for the week. And my emotions kind of bubbled up and I was like, ‘Somebody needs to hear this.'”

Whitney took to the social media video sharing app TikTok and recorded a video of herself crying, a video that has since gone viral with more than 5 million views.

Whitney, who works part-time at a movie theater to help subsidize her family’s income, said that for her family, she doesn’t have the opportunity to bulk buy like some.

“There’s so many people out there like myself that we, we don’t get paid very much,” she explained, adding that her husband is ex-military and a full-time student. “So, you know, we’re low income families and so it’s hard for us to be able to just go out and buy a large amount of things at one time.”

“When we do have the funds to be able to go purchase things and it’s not there for us to buy, it’s very frustrating,” Whitney said. “So those people that are buying in bulk or that are clearing the shelves make it harder for those of us that either are low income or only get paid every two weeks or even once a month.”

 

@browncoatbetty##thisapocalypsesucks♬ original sound – browncoatbetty

Panic buying refers to the phenomenon when consumers buy unusually large amounts of a product in anticipation of, or after, a disaster or perceived disaster, or in anticipation of a large price increase or shortage.

On Sunday, the National Retail Federation and the Retail Industry Leaders Association urged shoppers to restrain themselves from hoarding, asking that if they didn’t need an item in the next two weeks to leave it for someone else who does.

Hoarding and stockpiling creates unnecessary gaps between the time that someone who truly needs a product can find it back on retailers’ shelves,” they said in a statement. “This is particularly important for our most vulnerable neighbors — the elderly and those who are struggling with other health issues.”

Whitney got diaper eventually, but here again are my tips for alternatives to diapers in a pinch.

  1. Burp Rag. I’ve used cloth diapers as burp rags, so why not the other way around? Usually they are thick and will do the trick for a short amount of time at least. If you usually use cloth diapers and have a liner, then it should work a little better.
  2. Wipes. If you have the kind of wipes that need to be wetted prior to use or if you have any wipes that have dried out, they can be used in a pinch while you pick up some more. I would not advise using wipes that are wet, as this could cause a rash.
  3. Receiving Blanket. I wouldn’t suggest using your favorite one, just in case, but if you are out and about and have no other options then this will work. Most people have a receiving blanket in their diaper bag for infants, and it is large enough that you can fold it a few times for added layers or tie it around them.
  4. Maxi Pad. This may be a little embarrassing if others see you use one; however, it is also very effective. Maxi pads are made to be absorbent and can hold enough to give you the time needed to get some real diapers. Make sure you have it secured into a diaper bottom or onesie, so it doesn’t slip.
  5. Cheese ClothI would recommend folding this one as many times as you can and place it in a diaper bottom or onesie, the same as you would for a maxi pad. Since cheese cloth is made to have liquid wrung through it, you want to make sure you have as many layers as possible, and don’t rely on it lasting a long time.
  6. DishtowelAgain, I wouldn’t use your favorite one, but at least this one will be more absorbent and may buy you some additional time.
  7. Wash Cloth. Depending on the size of your washcloths, you may want to use more than one, and either fold them or wrap them around and tie at the waist.
  8. Pillow Case. Go for cotton and not silk or satin for best results. Bunch it together and tie or pin it up like a cloth diaper.
  9. NapkinI would suggest cloth, and not paper, but again stay away from your favorites. You can couple a few together for added protection and pin up the same as a cloth diaper.
  10. Paper Towels. Notice the plural on towels as one will not cut it. I would use about four or five and fold up to insert the same as the maxi pad listed above.

I hope these tips help! Good luck, moms (and dads and caregivers!)

This Mom’s Hilarious Breakdown of the Typical Swim Meet is Perfectly True!

img_7488

Blogger and Public Health professor and author Julianna Miner from Rants from Mommyland penned a hilarious blog post she recently republished on TODAY about what happens at your average swim meet.

As a “swim mom” who, like Miner, also has three kids who swim on a team each summer, I can totally relate to her well-written hilarious blog post.

With permission, Miner’s fun take is reposted below for the edification of all those who want a good chuckle at what we go through.

And if you’re a swim mom (or dad), I’m sure you’ll relate as well!  Enjoy!

I have three kids and they all swim on a swim team every summer. I decided to capture my experience at a morning swim meet, for those of you not in the water cult.

img_7487

6:00am: Wake up, drink coffee. Wake up grouchy children.

6:45am: Arrive at the pool. Parking lot is already full. Let the kids out and park far away. Carry/drag chairs, bags and a cooler as if I were large pack animal. It occurs to me suddenly that as mother of three there is no denying that I am a large pack animal.

6:58am: Small miracle occurs. I find a great place to set up chairs, etc. Next to friends. With a good view of the pool. In full shade. Wish I’d brought a sweatshirt actually, is kind of chilly.

7:00 am: Kids jump into the freezing cold pool for warm ups and exchange looks with each other like – WHY DO WE DO THIS AGAIN?

7:30am: Children begin harassing me for money for the snack bar. I try to hand them something healthy from the cooler. Suddenly every other kid at the swim meet is eating large, chocolate-frosted donuts.

8:00am: A 10th grader is now singing the National Anthem. She is really good. Why do I get slightly (and embarrassingly) choked up by this, yet again? And why is it a surprise every time when it does? I am dumb.

8:05am: Child #1 swims and makes it across the pool without a near-fatal drowning accident occurring. Success!

8:25am: Children 2 & 3 have raced and I screamed my head off to KICK! KICK! KICK! even though I know perfectly well that they can’t hear me underwater and so it’s pointless. I don’t want to yell KICK! KICK! KICK! But it just comes out.

8:30am: Give in and take kids to the snack bar for donuts (as I am out of coffee anyway).

8:55am: Child #2 runs over to me, dripping wet and beaming. “Did you see that, Mommy?! Did you see that?!” I blink twice and answer: “Yes! That was awesome! Here have a dollar! Go get another donut!” The moms sitting next to me giggle.

9:00am: Still cursing myself for participating in a sport where if you get distracted for literally 30 seconds you miss the whole thing.

9:20am: Child #3 swims her best time ever and is so happy she can’t stand it. It might be the best feeling in the world.

9:40am: Feel momentary surge of guilt for not volunteering today. Then remember that husband is traveling and I’m on my own with the kiddos. And also how I stayed until 10:30pm to move chairs around on the pool deck and take out trash at the night meet last week.

10:05am: At some point, the kids drag the cooler of healthy snacks over to the picnic area. I go to retrieve it and observe that all of the food in it appears to have been consumed by wolves.

10:15am: Get to see lots of familiar faces and families from last year, which is great. Why do all these kids keep growing so much? Dear GOD – that one has a mustache. Last year he was playing with Pokemon.

10:20: Child #2 has apparently forgotten how to do the backstroke and gets disqualified. He is devastated for five minutes and then says: “I’m hungry! Can I have a donut?”

10:30am: A kid is swimming breaststroke for the first time. He is tiny and can barely make it across the pool. All the other swimmers in the race have finished and are hanging onto the wall, watching him. He looks around and sees he’s dead last. He starts to sag in the water. Parents who don’t even know the kid begin to cheer their hearts out. KICK! KICK! KICK! Teenage coaches from the other team start clapping for him and running up and down the side of the pool. He touches the wall and the whole place goes nuts for him. The swimmers in the lanes on either side of him shake his hand and pat him on the back.

10:40am: Still thinking about how happy I am for participating in a sport where a kid who comes in last still walks away feeling awesome.

10:45am: My chair is now in full sun and it’s hot as balls.

10:49am: The timers are switching to the other side of the pool and “Gagnam Style” starts to play over the speakers. A horde of small children start to boogie down. Some of them know all the moves and it quickly becomes a dance battle for the ages.

10:55am: Child #3 swims her hardest and gets crushed by the kids who train all winter. She’s still smiling because she beat her best time.

10:59am: Child #2 wanders over and says: “I’M HUNGRY”.

11:05am: Misplace my youngest child, age 5. Find her sitting with John Ross, a 15 year old boy she adores, who is very patiently discussing Spiderman with her. I ask her to come back to our chairs. She glares at me and says: “WE ARE TALKING. ABOUT SPIDERMAN.”

11:30am: The crowd has thinned and the meet is winding down. Watching the teenagers swim Butterfly now. It’s kind of beautiful. I make a comment about this to my kids, in the hopes that they’ll watch and really observe how it’s done when it’s done well. The big kids glance at the race for a second then go back to playing Uno in a towel fort with their friends. The little one is asleep in a lounge chair with a ring pop dangling off one finger.

Noon: Arrive home. Face sunburned to a bright red. Want to collapse into the dark, air conditioned living room and not move ever again.

12:05pm: Child #3 wanders into the living room and says: “I’m bored. Can we go to the pool?”

img_7489

Follow Julianna’s blog at Rants From Mommyland and on Facebook HERE!

Also, be on the look out for her upcoming book, “Text Me When You Get There” to be published in August 2018 by Tarcher Perigree/Penguin Random House.