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MLK Day

MLK Day: It’s Not Too Late to Do a Service Activity Tomorrow

mlk day

Tomorrow is the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, MLK Day of Service.

All around the nation, schools, philanthropic organizations and civic groups have planned service events in honor of the memory of the civil rights icon who gave his life for others.

It’s actually NOT too late to find a service activities organized around the nation to participate in tomorrow or in an ongoing basis, and there is still time for you and the children to do something kind on their own for their neighbors or fellow man.
 
Here are a 6 other  suggestions besides watching a speech and reflecting on its meaning:
  1. Take garbage bags down to the town creek or some other littered area near your home and clean it up.
  2. Make sandwiches and pack fruit and a snack into about a few dozen brown bags and pass them to homeless people in the closest town or city to you.
  3. Gather old toys and bag them up to donate to Goodwill or a local family shelter.
  4. Call a local home for the elderly and ask if you can come by and play cards and/or board games with the residents.
  5. Make Homemade colorful Get Well Greetings cards to send to a local children’s hospital/
  6. Make Festive Thank You Cards to send to the local USO to ship off to military serving abroad.
Good luck and Happy MLK Day of Service!

MLK Day: Cities With Most Racial Inequity Progress



With Martin Luther King Jr. Day around the corner and 58 percent of Americans saying race relations are “generally bad,” the personal-finance website WalletHub today released its report on 2020’s States with the Most Racial Progress as well as accompanying videos.

To measure America’s progress in harmonizing racial groups, WalletHub measured the gaps between blacks and whites across 21 key indicators of equality and integration in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The data set ranges from median annual income to standardized-test scores to voter turnout.

This report examines the differences between only blacks and whites in light of the high-profile police-brutality incidents that sparked the Black Lives Matter movement.

Most Racially Integrated States States with the Most Racial Progress
1. New Mexico1. Wyoming
2. Hawaii2. Texas
3. Wyoming3. Mississippi
4. Texas4. Georgia
5. West Virginia5. New Jersey
6. Arizona6. New Mexico
7. Kentucky7. Florida
8. Montana8. North Carolina
9. Maryland9. South Carolina
10. Colorado10. Idaho



Key Stats

  • The District of Columbia has the lowest gap in homeownership rates between whites and blacks, at 12.82 percent. Connecticut has made the most progress in closing this gap since 1970, with a change of 8.81 percent.
  • Hawaii has the lowest gap in median annual household incomes between whites and blacks, at 10.54 percent. Wyoming has made the most progress in closing this gap since 1979, with a change of 32.18 percent.
  • Vermont has the lowest gap in unemployment rates between whites and blacks, at 0.18 percent. North Dakota has made the most progress in closing this gap since 1970, with a change of 10.01 percent.
  • Hawaii has the lowest gap in poverty rates between whites and blacks, at 1.49 percent. Mississippi has made the most progress in closing this gap since 1970, with a change of 25.45 percent.
  • Vermont has the lowest gap in the share of adults 25 years and over with at least a bachelor’s degree between whites and blacks, at 1.25 percent.  Idaho has made the most progress in closing this gap since 1970, with a change of 4.82 percent.

To view the full report and your state or the District’s rank, please visit:

https://wallethub.com/edu/states-with-the-most-and-least-racial-progress/18428/

MLK Day: 6 Last-Minute Way Your Child Can Honor by Serving

If you didn’t enroll you or your children to participate in one of the  many service activities organized around the nation, there is still time for you and the children to do something kind on their own for their neighbors or fellow man.

Here are a 6 other  suggestions besides watching a speech and reflecting on its meaning:

  1. Take garbage bags down to the town creek or some other littered area near your home and clean it up.
  2. Make sandwiches and pack fruit and a snack into about a few dozen brown bags and pass them to homeless people in the closest town or city to you.
  3. Gather old toys and bag them up to donate to Goodwill or a local family shelter.
  4. Call a local home for the elderly and ask if you can come by and play cards and/or board games with the residents.
  5. Make Homemade colorful Get Well Greetings cards to send to a local children’s hospital/
  6. Make Festive Thank You Cards to send to the local USO to ship off to military serving abroad.

Good luck and Happy MLK Day of Service!

MLK Day: 5 Ways to Celebrate with Your Kids

martin-luther-king-682116_1280

Keep the Dream Alive

“He wanted all the brown kids and white kids to like each other.”

“He wanted everybody to sit on the bus wherever they want.”

“He had a dream and it was so big and then he died.”

In honor of the gifts Dr. King gave our nation, try these five creative ways to help children celebrate his vision of hope and sense of humanity.

1. Create a Multicultural Banquet!

One of Martin Luther King’s greatest achievements was his ability to help Americans appreciate diversity. Celebrate his birthday with an eclectic holiday dinner featuring cuisine from different countries or geographical regions. Serve Puerto Rican rice-and-beans, Boston clam chowder, a Chinese stir-fry, and a peach pie from Dr. King’s native Atlanta. The variations on this theme are endless, and the dinner doesn’t need to be time-consuming. You can achieve almost the same effect by stopping for takeout from Kentucky Fried Chicken, Taco Bell, and your local pizza parlor (Italian or Greek).

2. Decorate with Many Colors

What’s a birthday party without decorations? Here’s a great MLK Day activity to do with younger children: Make the classic paper chains using black, white, red, yellow, and brown construction paper to represent the various skin tones found across our nation. Show kids the symbolism behind the craft: “Each link represents a hand, and our chain reminds us that Dr. King joined hands with people of all colors when he marched for freedom.” A variation on this theme: Children can trace their own hands, then color them in using different skin-tone shaded crayons.

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7 Last Minute Ways You and Your Kids Can Celebrate the #MLKDay of Service

MLK Day   1.18.2016   Corporation for National and Community Service

Today, Monday, January 18, 2016, is the MLK Day of Service.

A few Hollywood celebrities including our Bellyitch Bumpwatch alum Kerry Washington took the time today to recognize Martin Luther King, Jr and the service holiday today in his honor.

  1. As the award-winning actress suggest, take some time off today to get the kids the listen to at least one or a snippet of the Civil Rights hero’s famous speeches.

 

 

If you didn’t enroll you or your children to participate in one of the  many service activities organized around the nation, there is still time for you and the children to do something kind on their own for their neighbors or fellow man.

Here are a 6 other  suggestions besides watching a speech and reflecting on its meaning:

  1. Take garbage bags down to the town creek or some other littered area near your home and clean it up.
  2. Make sandwiches and pack fruit and a snack into about a few dozen brown bags and pass them to homeless people in the closest town or city to you.

  3. Gather old toys and bag them up to donate to Goodwill or a local family shelter.

  4. Call a local home for the elderly and ask if you can come by and play cards and/or board games with the residents.

  5. Make Homemade colorful Get Well Greetings cards to send to a local children’s hospital/

  6. Make Festive Thank You Cards to send to the local USO to ship off to military serving abroad.

Good luck and Happy MLK Day of Service!

Do this MLK Day craft activity with your child

This month, we celebrate and honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr holiday in the United States, a day set aside to commemorate the birthday of civil rights activist and cultural icon. For many children, it’s just another day off from school.

However, given all of the contentious race-related debates around us in our daily lives, much of which our children consume, it may be a good idea to use the holiday this coming Monday to educate, edify and inspire your children to do servers. Here are some few tips from KidsActivities:  

First… 

Talk to children about Martin Luther King’s dream and the fact that one man managed to help change a whole country. Ask children what they think is unfair, and what they think they can do to change it. If they could change big things in the world, what would they be?
Next- 
Have children trace the outline of their hands on a variety of construction paper in different rainbow colors. Have them cut out each hand shape and then glue them onto the poster board. 

Now brainstorm things that the children believe need change in the world–and ways that they and your program can help. Few individuals will get the chance to speak before thousands of people at the Lincoln Memorial like Martin Luther King, Jr., but there are things your program can do to make a difference! 

Perhaps it’s collecting cans for a local food bank to help the hungry, or running a car wash to raise money for the homeless.  Maybe it’s bringing entertainment to cancer patients at a local hospital or sending care packages to soldiers abroad.

On each hand, write one thing that each child dreams of changing, such as Hunger or Homelessnes; next write a few sentences about what they can do to help.

Good luck parents and hopefully one of these exercises will support your efforts to raise conscientious, smart, balanced and empathetic children. 
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MLK Day: Celeb moms social media share about Dr. King

Some of our Bellyitch Bumpwatch moms of the past few years took to social media this morning to pay homage and send out tweets about Martin Luther King, Jr‘s holiday in the United States today. It’s a federal holiday set aside to pay homage to the birth of a man who led the Civil Rights Movement and encouraged the US government to move towards equality for all its citizens in all regions of the country, regardless of race. He also sparked the movement by empowering people to take peaceful action, through boycotts and marches, to effectuate change.

Today, some who took time to remind their millions of followers of King and his dream, include:

Nicole RichieInstagram

“Because of you I am living my dream! #dreamon” – Tia Mowry Hardrict Instagram

5 Ways to celebrate MLK Day with the kids

Bellyitch Rewind
Keep the Dream Alive
“He wanted all the brown kids and white kids to like each other.”

“He wanted everybody to sit on the bus wherever they want.”

“He had a dream and it was so big and then he died.”
In honor of the gifts Dr. King gave our nation, try these five creative ways to help children celebrate his vision of hope and sense of humanity.

1. Create a Multicultural Banquet!

One of Martin Luther King’s greatest achievements was his ability to help Americans appreciate diversity. Celebrate his birthday with an eclectic holiday dinner featuring cuisine from different countries or geographical regions. Serve Puerto Rican rice-and-beans, Boston clam chowder, a Chinese stir-fry, and a peach pie from Dr. King’s native Atlanta. The variations on this theme are endless, and the dinner doesn’t need to be time-consuming. You can achieve almost the same effect by stopping for takeout from Kentucky Fried Chicken, Taco Bell, and your local pizza parlor (Italian or Greek).

2. Decorate with Many Colors

What’s a birthday party without decorations? Here’s a great MLK Day activity to do with younger children: Make the classic paper chains using black, white, red, yellow, and brown construction paper to represent the various skin tones found across our nation. Show kids the symbolism behind the craft: “Each link represents a hand, and our chain reminds us that Dr. King joined hands with people of all colors when he marched for freedom.” A variation on this theme: Children can trace their own hands, then color them in using different skin-tone shaded crayons. 
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MLK Day of Service is Coming: 6 Websites to help you find volunteer opportunties

1963 and 2013 photo of the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial for the March on Washington – ABC7/WJLA
Last year marked the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.
Each year, January 20th is considered MLK Day of service and people nationwide are encouraged to volunteer and teach their children about community service. 
Here are some links to some websites that will help connect you, wherever you live in the US with volunteer opportunities near you. You can filter by activity and by appropriateness of the project for kids’ participation. 

Good Luck searching! Thanks for your service!

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