Loading...
Search results for

halle berry

Names You Give Your Baby if You Want Her to be a Musical Greatness



Posted on April 7, 2016 by Laura Woods

From Dizzy Gillespie’s expertise with the trumpet to Dick Van Dyke’s memorable performance on Mary Poppins, music pervades every corner of our culture. 

Using data from MusicBrainz, MooseRoots identified the names that, up to the present, are most common among musicians relative to the general population. 

While a name is by no means a predictor of musical success, patterns certainly exist among artists leading up to today.

To do this, MooseRoots analyzed the names of 249,549 male and 65,442 female musicians to find the top names of each gender. After comparing the frequency of the top musician names with the frequency of those names in the general population during 2014, we compiled a list of names more likely to appear among musicians, and ranked the list from lowest to highest frequency relative to the general population.

Note: All values are rounded to the nearest tenth.

Download MooseRoots’ app on the Google Play Store for information on thousands of baby names.

Mary

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 3.2

Musicians per 1 Million: 5,598.7

Babies per 1 Million: 1,346.9

Held by Mary J. Blige, Mary ranked No. 120 among baby girls in 2014.

Maria

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 3.5

Musicians per 1 Million: 6,384.4

Babies per 1 Million: 1,413.4

The Latin version of Mary — shared by the late singer Maria Callas — ranked No. 115 among female newborns in 2014.

Amanda

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 3.9

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,652

Babies per 1 Million: 537.5

Meaning “lovable” and “to love,” and held by Dresden Dolls singer Amanda Palmer, the name ranked No. 314 among girls in 2014.

Jane

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 5.2

Musicians per 1 Million: 3,241.3

Babies per 1 Million: 525.1

Shared by actress and singer Jane Powell, the feminine form of John ranked No. 322 in 2014.

Julie

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 6.1

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,848.4

Babies per 1 Million: 400.3

The French form of Julia only ranked No. 409 among baby girls in 2014, but it is shared by the legendary Julie Andrews.

Helen

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 7.2

Musicians per 1 Million: 3,339.6

Babies per 1 Million: 408

Defined as “Greek,” “ray,” and “sun,” the name held by singer Helen Vita ranked No. 404 among female newborns in 2014.

Laura

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 7.3

Musicians per 1 Million: 4,420

Babies per 1 Million: 535.5

Laura, a name meaning “laurel,” is held by Broadway star Laura Benanti and ranked No. 318 among baby girls in 2014.

Karen

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 8.7

Musicians per 1 Million: 3,143.1

Babies per 1 Million: 325

Shared by the late Karen Carpenter, the name ranked No. 492 among girls in 2014.

Christine

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 9.3

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,160.9

Babies per 1 Million: 210

Shared by former Fleetwood Mac singer Christine McVie, the French form of Christina ranked No. 689 among female babies in 2014.

Mara

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 10.3

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,357.3

Babies per 1 Million: 208.4

Held by singer Mara Carlyle, Mara ranked No. 695 among newborn girls in 2014.

Marie

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 11.7

Musicians per 1 Million: 3,437.8

Babies per 1 Million: 269.8

Marie, the French version of Maria, ranked No. 579 among baby girls in 2014, and is held by a number of luminaries, including singer Marie Osmond and the Australian operatic soprano Marie Collier.

Sandra

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 12.1

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,357.3

Babies per 1 Million: 179.5

Held by musicians like Sandra Chambers, the nickname for Alessandra ranked No. 800 among female newborns in 2014.

Linda

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 12.5

Musicians per 1 Million: 3,241.3

Babies per 1 Million: 240.4

The name meaning “pretty,” “soft,” and “tender,” is shared by Linda Ronstadt and ranked No. 615 among baby girls in 2014.

Sharon

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 12.6

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,160.9

Babies per 1 Million: 159.4

A Biblical name, Sharon ranked only No. 879 among female babies in 2014, even with the star power of singer Sharon Cheslow behind it.

Jenny

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 14.4

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,652

Babies per 1 Million: 172.3

A nickname for Jennifer and shared by singer Jenny Lewis, the name ranked No. 822 among baby girls in 2014.

Anne

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 14.8

Musicians per 1 Million: 4,518.2

Babies per 1 Million: 286.8

Anne, shared by music industry heavyweights like Anne Murray, was a unique choice for girls in 2014, ranking just No. 553.

Susan

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 15

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,652

Babies per 1 Million: 165.6

Susan, the vernacular form of Susanna and the name of singer Susan Boyle, ranked No. 851 for female newborns in 2014.

Ann

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 18.6

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,848.4

Babies per 1 Million: 145.5

Held by jazz singer Ann Richards, this alternate spelling of Anne earned the rank of 945 among baby girls in 2014.

Louise

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 21

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,259.1

Babies per 1 Million: 102.7

Shared by singers like Louise Griffiths, the feminine form of Louis ranked just No. 1,219 in 2014.

Betty

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 21

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,160.9

Babies per 1 Million: 98

Held by singer and actress Betty Buckley, the short form of Elizabeth ranked just No. 1,254 among female babies in 2014.

Rita

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 21.9

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,964.4

Babies per 1 Million: 85.6

Rita, a pet form of Margarita, is held by Rita Quintero, and ranked only No. 1,382 among girls born in 2014.

Anita

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 22.2

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,964.4

Babies per 1 Million: 84.6

Originally a nickname for Ana, the name Anita ranked only No. 1,390 among female newborns in 2014, but is held by jazz musician Anita Baker.

Lisa

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 27.2

Musicians per 1 Million: 5,402.2

Babies per 1 Million: 191.4

Lisa, a variant of Liza and held by Lisa Marie Presley, only ranked No. 750 among baby girls in 2014.

Barbara

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 34.7

Musicians per 1 Million: 5,795.1

Babies per 1 Million: 162.5

Derived from the Latin word meaning “foreign woman,” the name shared by Barbara Mandrell ranked No. 863 in 2014.

Kim

Gender: Female

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 71.8

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,553.8

Babies per 1 Million: 35.1

Held by reality star and singer Kim Zolciak, the short form of Kimberley ranking just No. 2,577 for newborn girls.

Greg

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 106.5

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,429.1

Babies per 1 Million: 13.3

Held by famous saxophonist Greg Banaszak, the name Greg ranked No. 3,805 in 2014.

Dave

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 121.8

Musicians per 1 Million: 4,653.9

Babies per 1 Million: 37.9

Held by famous jazz musician and trombonist Dave Panichi, the name Dave ranked No. 1,883 in 2014.

Friedrich

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 134.2

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,136

Babies per 1 Million: 8.4

Meaning “peace” and “power” and held by the composer Friedrich Cerha, Friedrich was a rather unique choice among male newborns in 2014, ranking just No. 5,280.

Dieter

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 134.7

Musicians per 1 Million: 732.9

Babies per 1 Million: 5.4

Although Dieter, a name meaning “army and people,” is shared by cabaret artist Dieter Hallervorden, it only ranked No. 7,132 among boys in 2014.

Philippe

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 138.4

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,575.7

Babies per 1 Million: 11.3

The name held by singer Philippe Katerine is very distinctive, earning the rank of No. 4,325 among male babies in 2014.

Art

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 141.9

Musicians per 1 Million: 842.8

Babies per 1 Million: 5.9

Though shared by legendary artist Art Garfunkel, the name defined as “bear and champion” ranked just No. 6,615 among boys in 2014.

Michel

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 148

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,832.2

Babies per 1 Million: 12.3

Uncommon for boys in the U.S., the name Michel — held by composer Michel Legrand — earned the rank of No. 4,059 among male newborns in 2014.

Stan

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 156

Musicians per 1 Million: 769.5

Babies per 1 Million: 4.9

Shared by saxophonist Stan Harrison, the name remains uncommon among male babies in 2014, ranking just No. 7,981.

Bill

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 160.4

Musicians per 1 Million: 3,664.5

Babies per 1 Million: 22.7

Held by singer Bill Hudson, the name ranked only No. 2,605 among baby boys in 2014.

Chuck

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 176.5

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,136

Babies per 1 Million: 6.4

Despite being held by the renowned artist Chuck Berry, the pet form of Charles was a distinctive choice for male newborns in 2014, ranking just No. 6,321.

Georges

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 182.2

Musicians per 1 Million: 806.2

Babies per 1 Million: 4.4

Held by the late composer Georges Bizet, this unique name ranked No. 8,300 among boys in 2014.

Werner

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 205.7

Musicians per 1 Million: 806.2

Babies per 1 Million: 3.9

Defined as “army,” the name of famed jazz musician Werner Neumann was a very distinctive choice for boys born in 2014, ranking No. 9,512.

Rob

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 216.7

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,502.4

Babies per 1 Million: 6.9

Shared by rock stars like Rob Zombie, the short form of Robert is a rather unique choice as a given name, earning the rank of No. 6,195 among male newborns in 2014.

Ernst

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 266.6

Musicians per 1 Million: 952.8

Babies per 1 Million: 3.6

The name held by the late singer Ernst Busch, Ernst — derived from the German word meaning “serious business” and “fight to the death” — hasn’t been given to more than four baby boys in the U.S. since 2013.

Hermann

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 292.2

Musicians per 1 Million: 732.9

Babies per 1 Million: 2.5

Meaning “army” and “man,” and shared by multitalented musician Hermann van Veen, the name ranked No. 12,676 among male babies in 2014.

Phil

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 315.8

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,868.9

Babies per 1 Million: 5.9

The short form of Philip and held by iconic rocker Phil Collins, the name only ranked No. 6,912 among boys in 2014.

Rolf

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 321.5

Musicians per 1 Million: 806.2

Babies per 1 Million: 2.5

Rolf, meaning “fame and wolf,” ranked only No. 13,566 among male newborns in 2014, and is shared by musician Rolf Harris.

Pat

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 321.5

Musicians per 1 Million: 806.2

Babies per 1 Million: 2.5

Shared by singer Pat Boone, the nickname for Patrick ranked just No. 13,431 among baby boys in 2014.

Doug

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 338.7

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,209.3

Babies per 1 Million: 3.6

Though held by musicians like Doug Sahm, the name remains uncommon — no more than four baby boys have received the name since 2013.

Al

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 338.9

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,345.3

Babies per 1 Million: 6.9

Held by the late Al Jolson — an actor and singer — the name Al is used more as a nickname than a given name, ranking just No. 5,963 among male newborns in 2014.

Franz

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 440.1

Musicians per 1 Million: 2,381.9

Babies per 1 Million: 5.4

The German form of Francesco, the name held by composer Franz Waxman earned the rank of No. 7,160 among male newborns in 2014.

Georg

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 440.9

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,502.4

Babies per 1 Million: 3.4

Georg, a name held by musicians like Georg Ots, remains uncommon and ranked No. 9,924 in 2014.

Ed

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 487.6

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,465.8

Babies per 1 Million: 3

Ed, a nickname for Edward and shared by rapper Ed Skrein, is seldom used, and ranked No. 11,018 among baby boys in 2014.

Dick

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 711.8

Musicians per 1 Million: 1,722.3

Babies per 1 Million: 2.4

The name Dick, held by icons like Dick Van Dyke, ranked only No. 11,466 in 2014.

Bob

Gender: Male

Times More Likely to Be a Musician: 1,354.9

Musicians per 1 Million: 4,067.6

Babies per 1 Million: 3

Made famous by the great Bob Marley, the short form of Robert wasn’t commonly used as a given name for male babies in 2014, ranking just No. 10,796.

<link rel="canonical" href="http://names.mooseroots.com/stories/12248/baby-names-that-signal-musical-greatness">

Overdue? Here are 5 Ways to Naturally Induce Your Labor

Bellyitch Rewind

 

Premature birth may worry you as it worries most expectant parents but becoming overdue can also bring its own concerns and difficulties, and knowing natural ways to induce your labor could be helpful. As you become larger, sleeping can become more challenging. It becomes increasingly more difficult to get into a comfortable position as does breathing as your lungs become more crowded due to your overgrown uterus. If your baby stays in too long then there are risks associated with this, most commonly that your baby could pass meconium. If you find yourself overdue and are seeking advice to naturally help induce labour then the following is a list of ideas to do exactly that.

  1. Sex– is often prescribed by doctors to help induce labour because the prostaglandins in semen help soften and prepare the cervix to dilate.
  2. Herbs – hundreds of years ago midwives used herbs to prepare mothers for pregnancy, labour and birth. This was before the invention of pitocin. You must be very cautious with herbs of any kind as they can cause great damage if the correct dosage is not administered. Black cohosh, available in capsules or teas is commonly used to induce labour and can be with or without alcohol. During birth, black cohosh can help strengthen and regulate uterine contractions. Other herbs which have similar effects are red raspberry leaf and false unicorn root. These particular herbs have natural chemicals which are released into the woman’s body and stimulate the baby to encourage her to move and get positioned for birth. Herbs should not be used until the cervix is ready to open as they will not work until then. Beware of some herbs which can be dangerous to you or your baby such as aloe vera, bungleweed and pokeroot as these are some of the herbs that can cause premature birth or birth defects. Always consult a doctor before self-medicating with herbs. Primrose oil is used to induce labour as it has a comparable effect to semen in the cervix by softening and ripening it.
  3. Castor Oil – is taken by some women as a natural method of bringing on labour. The theory being that the diarrhoea and cramping it causes also causes contractions that can induce labour. It is unpleasant to taste but two tablespoons can be mixed into another drink such as a juice. It is advised to consume castor oil in the morning as you will be woken in the night with the cramping and diarrhoea if you take it in the evening. There are risks with taking castor oil such as the expectant mother becoming dehydrated because she has diarrhoea and also it increases the risk of the baby passing meconium while still in the uterus.
  4. Nipple Stimulation – for hundreds of years nipple stimulation has been used by women to help induce labour. It has an effect of releasing a natural form of pitocin called oxytocin. Similarly to pitocin, oxytocin triggers contractions that can bring on labour. This method for naturally inducing labour is only effective near to your due date and when you are ready to give birth. Before forty weeks, it is not advisable to induce labour. The nipples can be stimulated manually or a breast pump can be used. Care needs to be taken as your uterus can become hyperstimulated. Only stimulate one nipple at a time and rest immediately once you notice contractions. Wait at least fifteen minutes after the contractions have stopped before resuming. If you do not get any rest between contractions other problems can arise.
  5. Be Active – whilst most doctors advise you to slow down and reduce your activities as you approach your due date, it is also helpful to remain active as long as you do not cause yourself any stress. Walking a wee bit more than usual and slowly swinging your hips from side to side can help induce labour by stimulating your baby and getting her moving into the birthing position. If you fancy some fun, sex is always a good idea as I mentioned before because along with semen helping the cervix to soften, the female orgasm produces a hormone which aids childbirth.

Other methods women have used include acupressure and eating spicy foods, but watch out for possible nausea with spicy food and medical research has not yet supported this idea as definitely being beneficial.

God luck! Godspeed! And safe labor and delivery to  you!

20 Easy-to-Prepare Breakfast Recipes for the Family

breakfast

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but it can also get mundane. Finding quick, nutritious, easy-to-make breakfast to feed the family before the day can be a challenge. We rounded up about 20 recipes from Housekeeping.org’s list of 100 family meals, and picked out the breakfast recipes for you to try out with your fam! Good luck and enjoy!

Bountiful Breakfasts

Weekday mornings are notoriously busy, and getting breakfast on the table can seem almost laughable at times. Instead of relying on sugary cereals or frozen entrees, come up with a list of foods your kids can easily prepare. Not sure where to start? Use these 20 ideas as inspiration.

  1. Yogurt Parfait. By keeping a bowl of cut up fruit and yogurt handy your kids can layer this parfait all by themselves, says School Family Education.
  2. Banana Chocolate Chip Muffins. Simple recipes, like the ones on School Family, that can be mixed together and baked will encourage your child to become a budding cook.
  3. Very Berry Smoothie. Kids can throw some fruit and yogurt into a blender and mix it up for a fresh smoothie anytime, according to Parentables.
  4. Egg-In-A-Hole Lemon Ricotta Toasts. Turntable Kitchen has created a twist on the classic egg-in-a-hole dish by amping it up with ricotta and baking it in the oven.
  5. Ham and Cheese Breakfast Casserole. Kids Cooking explains how simple it is to layer the ingredients into a baking dish and create this impressive dish.
  6. Hot Cinnamon Toast. She Knows suggests letting your kids try this recipe, though they probably will need a little supervision for the oven part.
  7. 5-Minute Egg Breakfast Sandwiches. Kiddy Cook explains how your child can microwave an egg and toast an English muffin for a quick breakfast option.
  8. Baked Apple Gingerbread Pancake. Simple Bites encourages you to get your kids in the kitchen to make this baked pancake.
  9. Slow Cooker Bread Pudding. Nourishing Joy points out that this slow cooker recipe is simple to prepare the night before so you can wake up to a hot breakfast in the morning.
  10. Cinnamon Roll Baked Oatmeal. Lynn’s Kitchen details this simple, tasty recipe kids are sure to love.
  11. Crock Pot Granola. Stacy Makes Cents explains a method of cooking granola that makes it less likely to burn. Mix a few ingredients together and stir in the crock pot every half an hour.
  12. Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits. Cooking Light offers several healthy breakfast recipes for kids to try, like these biscuits.
  13. Sunrise Tacos. Let the kids build these funny sun tacos using breakfast ingredients found on Betty Crocker.
  14. Healthy Pancakes. Whip up some whole wheat pancakes with the kids using the recipe and directions found on Delish.
  15. Breakfast Cookies. Martha Stewart explains that these cookies are full of healthy ingredients and work perfectly for a breakfast on-the-go.
  16. Bagel Gone Bananas. Eating Well suggests a simple bagel spread with peanut butter and sliced bananas that kids can make for themselves.
  17. Breakfast Skewers. If you blunt the sharp points, even younger children can thread cheese, turkey, fruit and egg onto a skewer, according to Spoonful.
  18. Peanut Butter and Banana French Toast. This recipe from Allrecipes is so simple that kids can help make it.
  19. Breakfast on a Stick. Get the young kids in on making breakfast by letting them thread French toast squares and blackberries onto chopsticks, recommends Super Healthy Kids.
  20. Breakfast Pizza. Kids may need some help with the egg portion if they are young; Food Networkshows how they can pile ingredients onto an English muffin to be baked.

5 Things I had on My Pre-Baby Bucket List (And $75 Pre-Natal Product GIVEAWAY)

pre baby bucket list bellyitchblog.com happyfamily.com

After getting married  a couple years after law school, my husband and I decided to start a family, but before then, I already knew that there were things on my pre-baby bucket list I had to enjoy before taking on the challenges of parenthood. We didn’t call it a “bucket list” back then, but the concept was the same.

I was one of the first among my friends to marry and would be among the first to have kids, still I had a few other law school buddies who had children so I knew of all that was involved in child rearing.

Being the eldest of 4 children in my family, I had spent a substantial amount of my pre teens to college years babysitting, looking after my siblings or helping relatives and family friends care for cousins and other children in their family. So, I had an inkling of what was involved with child-rearing. I was well in the know that I had to get my free-spirit on before joining mommyhood.

Here is a list of things I did before jumping into the parenting pool.

traveling

1. Traveled on a moment’s notice – Back then and still today, last dirt cheap minute fares to far off places, spas and other locales came easy. Once you signed up for last minute deals emails, you could get an alert in your inbox on Thursdays, for example, purchase your ticket by Friday and be in the air after work. After children, the opportunities for such impromptu adventures are near impossible.

2. Spend Freely – Owing to number #1, most of the money you earned belong to you so you could splurge on a last minute trip, buy that expensive handbag, go out to eat twice a week because there was no other person’s college fund you needed to be saving for or some baby’s 1st birthday party you needed to use up all your rainy day fund to plan and throw.

3. Sleep in– Before kids, Sundays meant sleeping in. Saturdays wouldn’t yet involve games, practices, rehearsals, recitals, trips to the zoo, museums, and festivals. While all of those things are fun and I really enjoy cheering my children on and watching them perform or enjoy themselves at a craft fair, sleeping in and reading the Sunday paper in bed all day was a luxury too I enjoyed pre-having a family of my own.

4. Not have to clean regularly – After children, you no longer have the privilege of cleaning your home on Saturday and not have it messed up again until mid week or well into the following week before needing a new cleaning. Having a family of three or more means having more people to clean up after and less uncluttered spaces because families can be messy.

5. Take adult classes – I didn’t grow up in a family where we could afford classes, so before having kids, I enrolled myself in a host of fun classes: ballet, tennis, adult gymnastics, pottery, painting, cooking, whatever was available, I did. And again, having disposable income for myself, I could afford to!

Having enjoyed that life, I wouldn’t trade in the one I have now for anything in the world.  I am glad my husband and I had a chance to grow a little nest egg so we could buy a home for our future kids to grow up in. Today, there are more  resources, inventions, services and products available to parents that I wish I had available to me.

For example, I recently learned about Happy Mama which is the first organic baby food to expand into the prenatal category, offering Mom and Baby an easy nutrition solution throughout the First 1,000 Days, by starting as far back as the womb. How novel!

happy mama

You know like before, most of the products available aimed to give newborns, infants and babies a healthy start at birth.

But, the NEW Happy Mama® Prenatal collection is changing the trajectory of children’s health through nutrition by getting to baby before birth and making sure mom is in optimal health from the beginning of her pregnancy journey. We were gifted a generous package of the products to sample out and really enjoyed them!

The Happy Mama Prenatal collection includes a host of nourishing and healthy products including; Fruit + Veggie Blends, Probiotic Supplements and Gummies.

Another great thing about the collection is that it offers extra vitamins and nutrients that moms-to-be need like DHA, Choline, Calcium and Fiber, which they may not get from their diet or prenatal multi-vitamin alone.

When you can’t keep foods down because you’re suffering from nausea or morning sickness, these vitamins will come in pretty handy!

The Probiotic Supplement is flavor-free and easily dissolves in water – plus it’s a taste-less addition to soft foods. The supplement helps support Baby’s developing immune system. As you may know, probiotic supplements are also great for keeping one regular and are great for digestion and easing heartburn and other digestive woes that increase during pregnancy.

We’ve gone past the days of the ginormous yucky tasting pre-natal vitamins. Thank God!

Companies have gotten more inventive and are taking mom’s taste buds into account. Happy Mama’s Prenatal Gummies, for example, provide extra essential nutrition for Mama-to-be, such as Omega-3s, DHA, Choline and Vitamin D, with each bottle containing yummy gummies in three flavors: lemon, berry and orange. They are deelish! We tried them. Yummy!

Better than candy because the prenatal gummy is a supplement to your daily prenatal/multi-vitamin and it’s needed because the top prenatal vitamins on the market do not provide you with the recommended value of DHA, Choline or Vitamin D.

happy mama

The Happy Mama Prenatal collection is available at Target as part of the Made to Matter—Handpicked by Target™ product collection in the women’s health aisle, but before you buy some, you can win the line from Happy Mama here! Open to US only from Now until November 13. Many ways to enter. Daily Entry options available!

Happy Mama PreNatal Gift Certificate ($75)

For more information about Happy Family and the Happy Mama Prenatal collection visit www.happyfamilybrands.com. Also, be sure to follow them on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram, too!

FTC: This giveaway is sponsored by Happy Mama Prenatal

5 Tips to Keep Kids Brushing Daily

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease.
While many parents are aware that proper and frequent brushing is one of the most important steps in protecting their tot’s pearly whites, getting kids into the bathroom to brush – without kicking and screaming – can sometimes be a challenge.
The makers of Coral Kids Toothpaste, a fluoride-free formula made with EcoSafe™ ionic calcium from above-sea coral, knows that yummy toothpaste may not be the only trick parents need up their sleeves to sustain little ones’ interest in clean teeth. The makers share some of its favorite tips for getting kids keen on the teeth brushing routine: 
1.       Pick the perfect toothbrush. Take your little one shopping to select a special toothbrush. Favorite animated characters, spinning heads and flashing lights are just some of the enticing possibilities that may pique their interest. Letting them choose will boost their “big kid” confidence and make them more vested in brushing.
2.       Offer toothpaste that tastes like a treat. Appeal to small senses with a healthy toothpaste that tastes extra special, like Coral Kids’ in Xylitol-sweetened, safe-to-swallow berry bubblegum. But beware bells and whistles created with harmful chemicals, such as artificial colors and sweeteners, which may entice but can also lead to serious health concerns.
3.       Bring fun into the bathroom. Brushing should be taken seriously, but it doesn’t have to be serious. Encourage kids to make big, circular brush strokes like train wheels; create as many “mouth bubbles” as they can; or pretend they need to clean their “big dinosaur teeth.” When brushing is playful, there’s less pressure.
4.       Find a kid-friendly dentist. Make first trips to the dentist fun by choosing a provider who caters to children with music, puppets, toys and more. If the experience is positive, they’ll be more prone to want to impress the dentist (and possibly get a special treat) with their good at-home brushing habits.
5.       Set a good example. Show your kids that brushing is an easy, everyday routine by modeling frequent and scheduled brushings, such as right after breakfast, before bed or following a sweet treat. It can even be a family affair! When little ones see brushing as a simple daily habit instead of a chore, there will be less protest.

post signature