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7 Possible Reasons Your Period Is Late

Photo by Polina Zimmerman from Pexels

Some women live with irregular periods, and so do not fret over late periods. For others, however, a missed period could be cause for alarm. If you’re one of those latter women, you may wonder if there are reasons, aside from the obvious, that your period is MIA.

The good news is, there are several possible reasons for a period that pulls a no-show.

1.    Stress

Given the current state of events, it’s understandable that you’re under a lot of stress. Excess stress is one of the most common reasons for a missed period. Cortisol, which is the primary stress hormone, can suppress a number of bodily systems, including the digestive system, the immune system, and yes, the reproductive system. Over time, uncontrolled stress can lead to sudden weight changes, which is another factor that also negatively affects the monthly cycle. If you think stress is the reason behind your late cycle, take up exercise and practice relaxation techniques to see if that helps to get things back on track.

2.     Birth Control

Many birth controls these days are designed to prevent your ovaries from releasing eggs, according to Healthline. Once you quit taking your birth control, it may take up to six months for your cycle to become consistent again. Other types of birth control, such as the IUD or patch, can stop your periods from coming altogether.

3.    Early Peri-Menopause

Though somewhat uncommon, some women begin to develop signs of menopause in their early 40s, as opposed to the standard 45-55 range. If you experience missed periods before you are 45, you could have this condition, which simply means your ovaries are beginning to slowly reduce your egg supply. This may lead to late periods, periods that never come, and, eventually, the end of menstruation entirely.

4.    Weight Gain or Loss

Both excessive weight gain and weight loss can cause hormonal changes. Women who weigh 10% or more below the normal range for their height may experience several missed periods. In fact, a woman’s menstrual cycle may not return to normal until after she obtains a healthy BMI.

On the flip side of the same coin, young women who are overweight can also experience hormonal changes. If your doctor determines your weight is the culprit, he or she may recommend a diet and fitness regime.

5.    Chronic Disease

Chronic conditions such as celiac disease and diabetes can cause a woman to live with irregular menstrual cycles. This is especially the case if the woman doesn’t get her condition under control quickly. Blood sugar levels that either too high or too low can cause hormonal changes that have been known to affect the menstrual cycle. Celiac disease, if left untreated, can damage the small intestine and hinder the body’s ability to absorb key nutrients necessary to menstruation.

6.    Thyroid Issues

A thyroid that is over- or underactive can impair the body’s ability to regulate metabolism. This may lead to changes in hormone production, which would account for a missed period. By taking certain medications, you can correct the condition and return to a normal cycle.

7.    Pregnancy

If you do not live with chronic stress, are of a healthy weight, do not take birth control, do not currently live with any health conditions, and are sexually active, there may be a very good chance that you are pregnant. If you suspect this is the reason behind your late period, take a test now and then again in another two weeks.

If you are missing one or several periods, the best thing you can do is to visit your primary care physician. Your doctor can run health screenings and possibly a few tests to determine the cause behind your missed period.

Quarantine and Holding It Together: Moms Really Deserve This Mother’s Day!



Happy Mother’s Day!

Today more than any other Mother’s Day, you moms out there deserve this day! In the age of COVID-19, moms have been put to the test and stressed to the max!

I shared an empathetic poster from a parenting group the other day to my personal Facebook Feed which a lot of moms could relate to and it got quite a bit of likes.

When I went to the original post’s comment section, I discovered it littered with commentary by dads and others who were lambasting the post for not including dads and for it not being inclusive of parenthood.

One said that the post perpetrated a stererotype that mothers were more responsible for parenting and that the message was wrong. I was upset. While parenting is indeed not a thing moms alone are responsible for and we, as a society, should not insenuate that moms alone should bear the burden of motherhood, I see nothing wrong with acknowleding the present day facts.

It is a true fact that during this pandemic when a lot of governments around the world, in states, provinces, counties and localities, have issued global “Stay Home” orders, mothers have been given the extra responsiblity of keeping their household together!

And it’s not like they haven’t always bore that burden, often times at the expense of their own self-care and sanity, but they’ve done it without complaint, and often times, without enough gratitude from those who they are dedicating their love, affection, and patience to.

So yes…let moms be recognized for their endearing devotion to being the champion, cheerleader, teacher, chef, entertainer, educator, and more.

I love Today Show’s special tribute to mom from their kids and so I am sharing it here for us all to view and appreciate! Happy Mother’s Day Quarantine Moms! You deserve an extra shower of appreciation today!

Whether you’re expecting, a new mom or a veteran mom, old, young, poor or rich you deserve a day to acknowledge your role as a mother!

Happy Mother’s Day!

Whether you’re an expecting, brand new, or veteran mom, rich, poor, old or young, you deserve acknowledgment today!

What to Expect At Your First Pre-Conception Doc Visit

Deciding to start or expand your family is one of the most exciting times in your life!

It can also be one of the most nerve-racking. That’s why it’s so essential to confirm you’re properly caring for your health before you become pregnant to both settle those nerves, and ensure you’re building the right foundation for both you and for your future baby.

This is called Preconception Care, and talking with your doctor is one of the best ways to check for any potential risks or medical issues you may have before getting pregnant. Before you begin, you should start by setting a “Preconception appointment” with your doctor.

What Will My Doctor Review with Me During My Preconception Visit?

During your preconception appointment, your doctor should discuss histories related to medical, surgical, family (of both you and future dad), and reproductive histories.

She/He should also talk about your diet & exercise, alcohol & caffeine consumption (or other drugs/stimulants), along with any medications or supplements you may be taking.

Your preconception visit is really the perfect time to ask your doctor anything that may be on your mind. Whether it’s health concerns, past histories, sex, diet, or prenatal vitamins, this visit is all about you and your health. It’s so much about you, that it’s worth saying again.

Preconception Care is all about you, and your doctor is on your side to help you give birth to a beautiful baby.

Physical Exam.

Because you’re about to embark on this exciting new journey, a physical exam is one of the best ways to ensure you’re ready. You should also ask her/him about a pelvic exam or Pap smear.

Vaccinations.

If you’re not vaccinated for chickenpox or rubella (or you’re not sure), it’s essential to ask your doctor to check your medical records, and if you’re not, request a vaccine. If you develop chickenpox or rubella during pregnancy, you are at higher risk of developing pneumonia, or congenital disabilities (birth defects). While a vaccine may delay your attempts to conceive by a month or so, it will be well worth it in the end if you’re not vaccinated.

Genetic Counseling.

This may require a separate appointment with a genetic counselor, however, it will help you understand your family’s risk of passing on an inherited medical condition, and how easy it may be for you to conceive.

Prenatal Vitamins.

Even before you become pregnant, it’s important to start to think about taking a prenatal vitamin or at least increasing your consumption of Folate & Iron-rich foods such as Leafy Greens or Broccoli every day. Along with several other vitamins and minerals, Folate, in particular, plays a significant role during pregnancy, as it aids in neural tube development, and its importance starts the day you conceive (when you may not know you’re pregnant yet).

Diet.

Similar to Genetic Counseling, getting a firm grasp on your diet may require a separate appointment with a nutritionist, but remember, “we are what we eat”, and you’ll soon be eating for two! Understanding the right foods for you and your potential allergies, will help give you a leg up on a more comfortable, successful journey to motherhood.

To help you in your prenatal discussion

Check out this downloadable guide from this guest post host Rootd Prenatal Vitamin, which will help you in your conversations with your doctor about prenatal in general (not just ours).

Remember, this appointment is ALL ABOUT YOU, so take a deep breath and get ready for one of the most exciting journeys of your life.

Why You Should Still Go Out For a Walk During Pregnancy Even Now

walking

Just because you’re in quarantine and have a bun in the oven doesn’t mean your daily walks or exercise routine have to cease to exist.

In fact, exercise during pregnancy can be beneficial to both you and your baby.

There are necessary precautions you’ll need to take, especially as your body continues to grow, but before you cut back on keeping your body fit, consider the benefits of a healthy exercise routine.

Low-Impact Exercise

Low impact exercise carries little risk of injury for pregnant women, says Dr. Gia Fruscione, doctor of physical therapy and founder of DLVR Maternity. “Low impact exercises benefits your entire body and can be continued until birth,” she says. “Low impact exercise, such as walking, is especially beneficial if you are having joint problems.”

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, pregnant women should participate in 30 minutes of moderate activity most days of the week during pregnancy as long as there are no medical complications.

Exercising during pregnancy can help keep you at an optimal weight, says Fruscione. “Gaining too many pounds puts you at risk for a tougher delivery and gestational diabetes,” she says. “But, gaining too little can affect your baby’s growth.”

For women at a healthy pre-pregnancy weight, the target weight gain is usually 25 to 35 pounds, says Fruscione.

Walk to Wellness

Walking is an excellent form of non-impact exercise, especially for women who have not previously exercised prior to pregnancy, says Birgitta Lauren, pre and postnatal fitness and nutrition specialist and founder of Expecting Fitness, a resource for expectant moms.

“Walking or exercise in general makes your body and all organs more efficient at doing everything, including getting pregnant, staying pregnant and making a healthier baby,” says Lauren. “Exercise improves circulation and therefore blood and oxygen and nutrient flow to the baby, making the baby healthier than if mom didn’t exercise.”

Not only does walking help decrease weight gain by burning calories and keeping the heart healthy, but the act of exercise and moving your body produces proteins that create metabolites, which decrease risks for all diseases, including gestational issues or diabetes, hypertension, preeclampsia and premature delivery, says Lauren.

Debunking the Myths

Many pregnant women fear that exercise or too much walking can cause preterm labor, but according to Lauren, this is just a myth. “It actually prevents preterm labor,” she says. “A healthier mom has a healthier pregnancy and a healthier baby.”

Too much walking, though, can lead to uterine contractions if you have a pre-existing medical condition, says Fruscione. She advises checking with your physician before engaging in exercise if you have an existing medical condition before or during pregnancy. “If this is the case, too much exercise can lead to other complications such as bleeding, dizziness, chest pain, muscle weakness, calf pain and decreased fetal movement,” says Fruscione. “Call your health care provider if you have any of these symptoms.”

Another myth that exists is that walking during pregnancy makes you dilate more. Consistent exercise during pregnancy can help tone and prepare your muscles for labor and makes for an easier birthing process, says Fruscione.

In general, if you are engaging in walking or low-impact exercise, your entire pregnancy process will be much smoother, says Lauren. “Exercise improves the likeliness of ‘on-time’ dilation and a more efficient dilation,” she says.

When in doubt, always consult your physician, but know that the more you move your body, the healthier it may be for your baby. According to a study by Dr. James F. Clapp III at the Cleveland Health Center, exercise during pregnancy produces children that are healthier physically and mentally. As babies, they learn to do everything faster – from speaking to walking – than children from moms who exercised less or not at all, says Clapp. The study also concluded that these babies are happier and better behaved.

4 Natural Ways to Induce Your Labor

Premature birth may worry you as it worries most expectant parents but becoming overdue can also bring its own concerns and difficulties. As you become larger, sleeping can become more challenging. It becomes increasingly more difficult to get into a comfortable position as does breathing as your lungs become more crowded due to your overgrown uterus. If your baby stays in too long then there are risks associated with this, most commonly that your baby could pass meconium. If you find yourself overdue and are seeking advice to naturally help induce labor then the following is a list of ideas to do exactly that.

1. Sex– is often prescribed by doctors to help induce labor because the prostaglandins in semen help soften and prepare the cervix to dilate.

Herbs – hundreds of years ago midwives used herbs to prepare mothers for pregnancy, labor and birth. This was before the invention of pitocin. You must be very cautious with herbs of any kind as they can cause great damage if the correct dosage is not administered. Black cohosh, available in capsules or teas is commonly used to induce labor and can be with or without alcohol. During birth, black cohosh can help strengthen and regulate uterine contractions. Other herbs which have similar effects are red raspberry leaf and false unicorn root. These particular herbs have natural chemicals which are released into the woman’s body and stimulate the baby to encourage her to move and get positioned for birth. Herbs should not be used until the cervix is ready to open as they will not work until then. Beware of some herbs which can be dangerous to you or your baby such as aloe vera, bungleweed and pokeroot as these are some of the herbs that can cause premature birth or birth defects. Always consult a doctor before self-medicating with herbs. Primrose oil is used to induce labour as it has a comparable effect to semen in the cervix by softening and ripening it.

2. Castor Oil – is taken by some women as a natural method of bringing on labor. The theory being that the diarrhea and cramping it causes also causes contractions that can induce labor. It is unpleasant to taste but two tablespoons can be mixed into another drink such as a juice. It is advised to consume castor oil in the morning as you will be woken in the night with the cramping and diarrhea if you take it in the evening. There are risks with taking castor oil such as the expectant mother becoming dehydrated because she has diarrhea and also it increases the risk of the baby passing meconium while still in the uterus.

3. Nipple Stimulation – for hundreds of years nipple stimulation has been used by women to help induce labor. It has an effect of releasing a natural form of pitocin called oxytocin. Similarly to pitocin, oxytocin triggers contractions that can bring on labor. This method for naturally inducing labor is only effective near to your due date and when you are ready to give birth. Before forty weeks, it is not advisable to induce labor. The nipples can be stimulated manually or a breast pump can be used. Care needs to be taken as your uterus can become hyperstimulated. Only stimulate one nipple at a time and rest immediately once you notice contractions. Wait at least fifteen minutes after the contractions have stopped before resuming. If you do not get any rest between contractions other problems can arise.

4. Be Active – whilst most doctors advise you to slow down and reduce your activities as you approach your due date, it is also helpful to remain active as long as you do not cause yourself any stress. Walking a wee bit more than usual and slowly swinging your hips from side to side can help induce labor by stimulating your baby and getting her moving into the birthing position. If you fancy some fun, sex is always a good idea as I mentioned before because along with semen helping the cervix to soften, the female orgasm produces a hormone which aids childbirth.

Other methods women have used include acupressure and eating spicy foods, but watch out for possible nausea with spicy food and medical research has not yet supported this idea as definitely being beneficial.

5 Mocktail Recipes Preginistas Can Make For The Virtual Happy Hour

mocktails

mocktails

Virtual happy hours are becoming a big thing in this era of coronavirus break out. Offices and groups of friends are getting together on Zoom, Skype and other video meeting platforms to shoot the breeze, have a drink and listen to tunes together.

If you are expecting, certainly, you cannot have an alcoholic beverage if you plan to attend one of these things.

However, lucky for you, there re lots of mocktail recipes out there you can whip up so you can participate. Here are 5 recipes excerpted and curated below from past posts and CraftyBartending.

I love the soothing effect of ginger on digestion which is important for pregnant women dealing with indigestion, nausea and other issues so so check out the ginger mocktail below.

Nojito

 ( a non-alcoholic take on the Mojito)
10-12 fresh small spearmint leaves
1/2 lime, juiced
7 oz sprite zero or club soda
1 tbsp sugar or Splenda
crushed ice
In a cool tall glass, muddle the mint, sugar or splenda or Agave and lime juice. Add crushed ice and soda and stir well. Garnish with a lime wedge and a few sprigs of mint. Serve with a straw.

Pink Grapefruit Preggatini

Diet Pink Grapefruit soda
Pomegranate Syrup or grenadine
Splash of lime
Combine ingredients, add ice, stir and enjoy. Garnish with a slice of grapefruit.

Lemon, Lime & Bitters

Technically not a mocktail because it calls for bitters and bitters contains alcohol, but the overall alcoholic content is so small, that it barely counts. It’s a very easy drink to make so it’s great to have in your repertoire. This is an extremely popular mocktail in Australia, even for kids, but there’s no reason why it shouldn’t be popular elsewhere – so spread the word!

Serve in a Highball glass

  • 1/2 shot lime cordial
  • Top with sprite
  • 3 dashes Angostura bitters
  • 1 lemon wedge for garnish

Add sprite to an ice-filled highball glass. Float lime cordial on top. Add 3 dashes of Angostura bitters. Add the garnish.

Pineapple Ginger Beer

pineapple punch mocktail

This is a refreshing, non-boozy take on the Dark ’n’ Stormy cocktail. It replaces the rum with pineapple juice & adds some extra ginger syrup. It’s another great mocktail to add to your repertoire because it uses commonly available ingredients.

Serve in a Collins glass

  • 1 1/2 shots pineapple juice
  • 1 shot fresh lime juice
  • 1 shot ginger syrup
  • Top with ginger beer
  • 1 lime wedge for garnish

Shake & strain the first 3 ingredients into an ice-filled collins glass. Top with ginger beer. Add the garnish.

Shirley Temple

shirley temple mocktail

Commonly served to children dining in restaurants in replacement of real cocktails, this is an essential mocktail to know for the restaurant bartender. It’s believed to have originated in the 1930s in Hollywood, the name coming from the former Iconic child star, Shirley Temple. Funnily enough, she dislikes the mocktail describing it as far too sweet. That’s probably why children love it.

Serve in a Highball glass

  • 1/2 shot grenadine
  • 1/2 shot fresh lemon juice
  • Top with ginger ale
  • 1 cherry & 1 lemon wedge for garnish

Build in an ice-filled highball glass. Top with ginger ale & lightly stir. Add the garnish.

Enjoy!

Gestational Diabetes: What Newly Pregnant Moms Need to Know

pregnant lady on couch

Photo by Alekon pictures on Unsplash

If you’re newly pregnant right now, you’ll be asked to take a glucose loading test between 25 and 28 weeks of your pregnancy.

It’s one of those rites of pregnancy but most mothers-to-be just don’t look forward to, explain Twin Doctors, Dr. Idries Abdur-Rahman MD and Jamil Abdur-Rahman, authors of “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Pregnancy: But Were Too Afraid or Embarrassed to Ask”

Eighteen years ago, when I was pregnant with my first child, I took the test and found out I had developed Gestational Diabetes. I actually contributed to my diagnosis. Early in my pregnancy,  I discovered that one way to cope with all day morning sickness and nausea was to sip 7-11 Slurpees all day. If you’re familiar with that slushy ice beverage, you know it is loaded with sugar, ergo high amount of carbs and higher blood sugar. After the discovery, I got treated and recovered.

It is very important to not skip the test.

You need to know if you have it because untreated gestational diabetes can cause premature birth and stillbirth, the March of Dimes warns. 

How does the test go

The Twin Doctors write in Everything You Ever Wanted to Know:

The loading part of the glucose loading test involves drinking a super sugary drink called glucola. Glucola comes in multiple flavors with orange, lemon and fruit punch being the most common. All of the glucola drinks contain 50 grams of glucose. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t metabolize (break down) sugar the way that it normally would, this results in higher than normal blood sugar levels. One hour after you drink glucola, your blood will be drawn, if your blood glucose level is more than 140, it is considered abnormal. Because the GLT is a screening test, an abnormal GLT means that you have a higher change of having diabetes but it is not diagnostic.

If your GLT is abnormal, you have to do another test called the 3-hour Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT). This is the definitive way to diagnose gestational diabetes. This test involves drinking twice as much of the glucola drink (100 grams) and having your blood drawn four times. Unlike the initial GLT, the 3-hour GTT requires you to fast for at least 8 hours and have your blood drawn before you drink the glucola, as well as 1-hour, 2-hours, and 3-hours after you finish the drink. An abnormal 3-hour GTT means that you have gestational diabetes

The Effects Linger

If you end up with an abnormal test and are determined to have GB, the good news is that it goes away when you deliver the baby. Your body will no longer sense a foreign object, the baby, and will stop fighting itself.  The effects are long term, however. The mother and baby become high risk of developing diabetes or other forms of autoimmune diseased sometime later in life. The Mayo Clinic recommends moms and their babies to be aware of this risk, and possibly test for it periodically.

It’s a First World thing

Diabetes is becoming more and more common in the western world and patients who have diabetes are considered higher risk during pregnancy.  According to the Twin Docs, in their book, Diabetic mothers have a higher risk of:

  • Preterm labor and delivery.
  • Developing high blood pressure during pregnancy.
  • Having abnormally large babies.
  • Sustaining pelvic floor damage during delivery
  • Delivering by C/Section.
  • Developing diabetes later in life.

None of these outcomes is wanted. However, you can  increase your odds of having a favorable test before it comes time to take the test.

Here are some tips:

Get good sleep. Chronic sleep deprivation is associated with higher incidences of heart disease, diabetes, weight gain and cancer so make sure to end your day earlier and get a good night’s rest, or if you can, take naps during the day.

Lessen your stress level.

Stress is known to raise blood sugar, and if you already have type 2 diabetes you may find that your blood sugar is higher when you are under stress. Changing what you eat, exercising more, or adjusting medication can help to keep it under control.

One study of obese black women without diabetes found that those who produced more stress-related epinephrine when asked to recall stressful life events had higher fasting glucose and bigger blood sugar spikes than those with lower epinephrine, suggesting it might raise your risk for getting diabetes too.

Eat Better

In my case, when I had the condition, the high sugar content of the Slurpees I drank daily to stave off nausea contributed to my blood sugar spike. Those drinks had a lot of carbohydrates. So, in short, you should reduce your carb intake.

In fact, when I developed GD and saw a nutritionist, I was told to not ingest more than 25 carb grams per meal. When I did not, I stabilized my blood sugar levels and stopped gaining an insane amount of weight. In fact, I only gained about a few more pounds after that. Before, I was gaining too much weight and too fast.

Health information website Healthline recommends that you:

  1. Eat protein with every meal.
  2. Include daily fruits and vegetables in your diet.
  3. Limit or avoid processed foods.
  4. Pay attention to portion sizes to avoid overeating.

It is very possible to reverse a dangerous course and end up getting a positive result when your time comes to take the test if you stick with these tips.

 

 

Want more information? Get the Twin Doctors’ book:

COVID-19 Tips for TTC, Expecting and Brand New Moms

hugging couple

hugging couple

Photo by Shvets Anna from Pexels 

During the global COVID-19 crisis, pregnant, trying to conceive couples and those within weeks/months of giving birth are questioning the safety of going to the hospital, doctor’s office, labs and clinics.

Yale University Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology Mary Jane Minkin ffers tips and tells women to stay calm but be prepared.

“As we experience unprecedented times with many unknowns, the most important thing to remember is that health care providers are prepared to handle all health-related concerns. And, they are taking all steps necessary to be available to their patients,” says Dr. Minkin, who is also the founder of MadameOvary.com . “However, women must take personal responsibility for their health and wellbeing and utilize telehealth appointments if available.”

Here are Dr. Minkin’s Facts and Tips:

  1. Get your flu shot: Pregnant women have altered immune systems; therefore, they are at an increased risk for respiratory infections.
  2. Don’t hesitate to call the doctor’s office. Even if you’re not experiencing serious symptoms, doctors and nurse practitioners are available via phone to answer all your questions and concerns. This is the safest first step, rather than going directly into the office. Doctors will do their best to evaluate symptoms, prescribe medicine or make proper arrangements based on symptoms for you to go to a lab for testing or the hospital. Your healthcare provider should make sure you do not spend time in the waiting room, and you will be escorted directly to specially designed isolation rooms for fetal monitoring, or labor.
  3. Pregnant women should revisit doctor schedules with their OB/GYN. OB/GYN offices will still be seeing their pregnant patients, but visits will be deliberately spaced apart to avoid spending time in the waiting room. It is also wise not to allow friends or family members to accompany you to your appointment, or ultrasound, at this time.
  4. Stock up onPre-Natal gummy vitamins like Vitafusion  which should be taken when trying to conceive through breastfeeding.
  5. If you suspect you might be pregnant, and showing signs and symptoms like morning sickness, food cravings, mood swings, and fatigue, etc., have First Response Early Result Pregnancy tests at home, so you don’t need to leave the house until Covid-19 settles down.  Women can take a test up to six days before a missed period. Be sure to call your doctor right away if the test is positive to put a proper plan of action in place.
  6. Mothers infected with the coronavirus should follow their pediatrician’s guidelines for breastfeeding and precautions to take (wearing a mask and gloves, hand washing, etc.) while spending time with baby.

Stay healthy moms, moms-to-be and soon-to-be new moms!!!

What To Call the Quarantine Babies {Non Obvious Names}

No doubt, we may be welcoming some new Coronavirus Quarantine kids in 9 months or so. Now, these kids cannot be given names too obvious  about the world circumstances that surrounded their conception.

Therefore, we’ve got  to be creative when it comes to giving them names to not be too obvious. Despite that funny meme out there, you certainly cannot call your baby Quarantine! Nope that will not do, but we can get creative with it.

Tina

Consider Tina for a girl.  Tina is a female given name. It originates from Old English Tyne/Tyna/Tina, meaning river. It is also a diminutive for names such as Albertina, Bettina, Christina, Christine, Kristina, Martina, Valentina.

No one would ever thing it was a derivative of Quarantine.

Rhona

This is a girl’s name of Scottish origin and means “might” and it will take the will of the might to defeat this disease. The name was coined in Scotland in the late nineteenth century, according to the website Nameberry.

And because the spelling “Rona” would be too obvious that it was a take off Corona, adding that “h” is smart.

Corey

Similarly, Corey is a masculine version of the name Cora and means Chosen, per SheKnows. The name has Irish, Scottish, American, Gaelic and English heritage and origins. It’s a perfect all around name for a virus that affected us all around the world.

And no, we cannot go with Cora. It’s too obvious and frankly, could be embarrassing.

Quinn

Derived from the Irish surname O’ Quinn which is from the Gaelic O’ Cuinn (descendant of Conn), the name means wisdom, reason, or intelligence.

When you think of the names that start with the letter Q as in Quarantine, certainly Quinn is high on that list right? It’s a name that is unisex and can apply to a girl or boy.

Then, we have the names of the governors, here in the US anyway, who have lead their constituents  very well to get them thru these times:

Gavin

California’s governor Gavin Newsom stayed in front of the viral spread a bit when he recently ordered a complete lockdown of the Bay Area in which residents must stay home unless they need to go out to purchase essentials.

Andrew

New York’s Mayor Andrew Cuomo has also been an active face on TV given his state has had the most cases of the virus to date: over 10,000.

Larry

My state’s Governor Larry Hogan of Maryland has remained ahead of the feds with his active approach. Each of his press conferences has been reassuring and he held a press conference when we had our first and second deaths.

Jay

Governor Jay Inslee, the governor of the state that saw the very first case, Washington. He set the example for other states to follow.

Gina

Rhode Island’s Governor Gina Raimondo was aggressive in ordering a shut down as well.

Ned

Connecticut’s Governor Ned Lamont similarly signed a recent executive order as part of a new campaign called “Stay Safe, Stay at Home” that will require non-essential businesses to close.

Finally, if one is looking to give a kid a name after the times, an obvious pick would be  the scientists, health officials delivering us all solid news on how to stay healthy.

Anthony

As summarized by The Guradian, “[t]ested by Donald Trump, who demands loyalty over facts, Dr. Anthony Fauci has earned praise from the US public for telling the truth about coronavirus, even when it means contradicting the president.”

There are others around the world as highlighted in this recent piece on The Guardian you can read here!

No matter what parents select, any baby born out of love (and forced seclusion) is a blessing.

9 Ways to Avoid Hair Loss After Pregnancy

Being a new mom can be one of the most emotionally rewarding — and challenging — experiences a woman faces. And while you may have anticipated your body to go through a whirlwind of changes, you may not have expected your hair to start falling out in clumps.

Also referred to as postpartum hair loss, telogen gravidarum, and telogen effluvium, excessive hair shedding after childbirth (which would occur anywhere between two and four months after giving birth) can affect between 40 and 50 percent of women, according to statistics from the American Pregnancy Association.

“When a woman is pregnant, she has a lot of extra hormones in the body, including estrogen,” says Christine Carlan Greves, a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist in Orlando, Florida. “The estrogen helps protect us from losing our hair. Then when she has the baby, there’s a sudden change in the hormone levels, including a drop in the estrogen. And this shift can cause a response in the body that may affect the hair cycle.”

Hair loss is a normal occurrence for a woman after a pregnancy. Telogen effluvium is the medical term for post-pregnancy hair loss, which happens to nearly 50 percent of women after they give birth. A temporary condition, this hair loss should not cause a woman to become bald or experience visibly thin spots.

Use these tips to reduce or prevent hair loss after pregnancy.

Steps

  1. Avoid hairstyles that pull or stretch your hair. Braids, cornrows, weaves or tight rollers can pull hair and cause stress and trauma to your scalp. Hair that is excessively pulled is more likely to fall out naturally, without the extra issue of telogen effluvium affecting your hair growth cycle.
  2. Maintain a healthy diet that includes fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are not only naturally health, but they also contain flavonoids and antioxidants that protect hair follicles. Additionally, these foods encourage increased hair growth, which can offset any hair lost after pregnancy.
  3. Add vitamins and nutrients to your diet. Vitamin B complex, vitamins E and C, zinc and biotin help increase hair strength and health. Take extra supplements or eat foods rich in these nutrients and vitamins to help retain pre-pregnancy locks. Try Nature’s Bounty Optimal Solutions Hair, Skin & Nails Formula which gets great reviews.
  4. Select a shampoo with quality ingredients. Shampoos that contain biotin or silica improve hair health and stimulate follicle growth. Use this shampoo regularly and rinse with cold water.
  5. Comb your wet hair with a wide-toothed comb. A wide-toothed comb reduces the amount of pulling and stress you apply to your hair as you attempt to remove tangles after washing it. Excessive pulling of your hair can increase the chances of it falling out.
  6. Reduce the use of heated styling tools. Heated styling tools like curling irons, hot rollers, flat irons and blow dryers dry hair out and may increase hair loss. Allow your hair to air dry and style it naturally. If you must use heated styling tools, use the coolest settings possible or give your hair a cool shot of air afterward with your hair dryer.
  7. Trim split ends. Split ends cause your hair to be less healthy. Unhealthy hair is shed in larger amounts than healthy hair.
  8. Avoid stress. Having a new baby to take care of can create more stress in your life, but try to avoid additional stressful situations or feelings. Stress can cause your hair to fall out or decrease in thickness. Avoid stress to increase your chances of retaining more of your pre-pregnancy hair
  9. Get a shorter haircut. Long hair weighs more and pulls from your scalp with its constant downward pull. Shorter haircuts cause less pressure to your hair follicles, which will decrease chances of increased shedding. A shorter hairstyle may cause your hair to look fuller and healthier, in addition to being easier to take care of than longer styles.

Take it easy and good luck new moms!