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Coronavirus

Study: The Covid Pandemic Will Set Working Mothers Back A Decade

The Coronavirus will set working women back a decade in progress, several major websites have reported citing a reecent study. In particular,  the Wall Street Journal published a shocking feature that really set up the case:

Seven months into a pandemic that has turned work and home life upside down, working women are confronting painful choices that threaten to unravel recent advances in gender equity—in pay, the professional ranks and in attaining leadership positions.

Women have already lost a disproportionate number of jobs.

That is partly because of a segregated workforce in many fields in which women make up more of the lower-income service and retail jobs that vanished as Covid-19 gripped the economy.

While women are 47% of the U.S. labor force, they accounted for 54% of initial coronavirus-related job losses and still make up 49% of them, according to McKinsey & Co.

More women—particularly mothers—say they may have to step back or away from jobs they still have, a new major study shows.

Source: McKinsey & Co. and LeanIn.Org Women in the Workplace 2020 survey of more than 40,000 employees, June-August

Though the pandemic has forced fathers and mothers to juggle careers with child care and remote schooling, women often shoulder the brunt of those responsibilities.

That outsize burden has long-term consequences: About one in five working mothers surveyed this summer for the sixth annual Women in the Workplace study by McKinsey and LeanIn.org say they are considering dropping out of the workforce, at least temporarily—compared with 11% of fathers.

An additional 15% of mothers report they may dial back their careers, either by cutting their hours or switching to a less-demanding role. Among women with young children, the struggle is especially acute: Nearly a quarter say they may take a leave of absence or quit altogether.

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People Don’t Really Care About Celebs As Much in the Covid Era

adele shocked

adele  shocked

Suddenly…celebrities have become a lot less relevant in the age of COVID-19. If you follow this blog, you might have noticed that while it once had a heavy dose of daily celebrity news, that type of coverage has slowed to a trickle.

Writer Jade Hayden at Her.ie took a more cynical and harsh approach, writing:

The Covid-19 outbreak has changed the way we consume news.

Instead of living our lives and simply reacting when something bad happens, we are consistently waiting for the bad thing to happen…

In a not dissimilar way, people have changed the way they engage with celebrity news too. Or rather, they haven’t really been engaging with it at all.

Where we once stood impatiently waiting for the Kardashians, the royals…to give their ever relevant thoughts on world events, suddenly the uninformed opinion of a celebrity doesn’t really matter much anymore.

In the same way people criticized Sam Smith for sharing their crying during isolation video, many questioned why Ellen DeGeneres was complaining about being bored on the grounds of her $27 million home.

They roasted every single person who lent their voice to that awful Gal GadotImagine“video. They scrolled on by when Ariana Grande was Zoom-ing her management team.

Right now, nobody cares. There are more pressing things to worry about.

Suddenly, a celebrity’s two cents isn’t all that important (unless they’re donating it to charity, of course).

I wouldn’t go that far but as I wrote last December, our culture and society have already been gravitating away from the most bump obsessive news. From the nude celebrity magazine covers to the overpriced first baby covers, go check out that post HERE now! 

5 Ways to Education Your Kids About the Environment In Quarantine

hair

hair

With the state of our world today, it’s easy to give in to stress and hopelessness—especially with the ongoing pandemic. But as parents, it’s never been clearer that we all have a responsibility to raise the next generation to help make the world a better place.

Of course, it’s never easy to open up a conversation on issues like climate change and the coronavirus, but there are ways to do it without triggering unnecessary tension among your children.

That being said, here are five tips to educate your kids about the environment and how to help out.

Use technology

With most of us in self-quarantine, we can’t take our kids out or enroll them in summer camps as we please. Thankfully, there’s one resource that’s available amidst the threat of the virus: technology. YouTube has a ton of videos that can educate your kids about the environment, such as earth science and biology animations from Crash Course Kids and animal playlists from National Geographic Kids.

For something more interactive, another option is online games. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has developed a series of games that focus on the everyday issues regarding our oceans and air, such as factory leaks, pollution, and much more. Each game addresses a different real-life concern, and comes with solutions that your kids can do to make a difference.

Take them on walks

The best way to get your children to appreciate the environment is by seeing it firsthand. If your city isn’t in total lockdown, then try to go on walks every now and then. The Cut explains that not only is this safe (as long as you and your kids go alone and keep a distance), but it is even encouraged so you can get fresh air and exercise. It’s important to note, however, that this is easier said than done in certain parts of the country where going outside might get you a few glares from strangers just going to the grocery store.

But if you still have access to a park or other forms of nature, don’t let it go to waste. Of course, it helps to make your walks as comfortable and stress-free as possible. So, if you have more than one young child, look to take them out in a comfortable buggy.

The double strollers featured on iCandy are designed to let you push two children simultaneously, and can withstand most terrains—whether it’s grass or cobblestones. This way, you also don’t have to worry about them straying too far from you. For families who don’t have the option to go on nature walks, this option will have to wait—but that doesn’t mean you can’t stretch your legs in your garden and get some much needed vitamin D.

Adopt a pet

Owning pets is always a great way to teach kids a little responsibility. Unfortunately, with the current virus situation, even animal shelters are taking a hit. In a news report from Fox 13, it is reported that many shelters have been scrambling to find homes for their animals. Because until more pets are adopted, shelters are forced to limit the number of strays they can take in.

By adopting or fostering during this time, you’ll be saving lives and showing your child the importance of taking care of animals—all while giving them a new friend to weather this pandemic with.

Unleash their inner creative

Kids love art. In fact, our resident writer Jeneba Ghatt notes how art is one of the few activities that can keep your kids both educated and entertained. Coloring books are a popular option. For instance, if you want to teach them about space, NASA’s entire collection of printable coloring pages can help.

They even have pages dedicated to those involved in creating spaceships, such as scientists and engineers. Other creative things you can do include painting nature scenes or even crafting things using recycled materials. Nevertheless, it’ll definitely be an activity that both you and the kids will have fun with.

Buy local goods

Besides contributing to the local economy (which is especially important in times of crisis), buying local produce can teach your kids how to minimize their carbon footprint. Goods carried from other countries consume more fuel since they have to be delivered to the local markets, so it’s definitely not good practice to buy them all the time. Plus, local goods are always the fresher option.

A fun way to incorporate this lesson is by having them help in the kitchen. Teach them where each ingredient comes from and how they were made.

It’s easy to get swept up by the uncertainty that lies ahead, but remember that you have a part in making sure it’s a good one for everyone on the planet. The coronavirus is just one piece of the bigger environmental problem that awaits if we don’t act now. So let’s teach our kids about the environment and ensure they preserve it in the future. We need to leave it in good hands.

Reminder: Do’s and Don’ts to Survive the Coronavirus Pandemic

hear no evil

hear no evil

It’s not like you haven’t been inundated with advice and news lately but it never hurts to be OVERINFORMED and that’s why I’m sharing some Do’s and Don’ts for surviving the coronavirus pandemic from University of Arizona doctor Dr. 

Jane M. Orient:

Don’t panic. That is always good advice. If you, like the world’s economy, operate on just-in-time inventories, and did not take advice to stock up 3 weeks ago, do not join a mob at a big-box store. Somebody there is no doubt infected. Plus, there’s the risk of getting trampled or injured in a fist fight over the last roll of toilet paper. Most of the world survives without that luxury good. If you have no rice or beans or pasta in the pantry, that is more serious, but you should still avoid mobs if at all possible. Take-out and drive-through places are booming.

Don’t treat fever without a doctor’s advice. Fever is not a disease. It is an important defense mechanism. Very high fevers (say 105 degrees) can cause brain damage, and children can have seizures. But don’t pop Tylenol or ibuprofen at the first sign of fever. Many of the casualties in the 1918 pandemic might have been caused by heavy use of aspirin. Like aspirin, popular nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDS) such ibuprofen also have detrimental effects on blood clotting. Try lukewarm sponge baths for comfort.

Don’t rush out and get a flu shot. I know, a lot of doctors and public health authorities urge everybody to do this. Influenza can kill you, and the flu shot decreases that risk by 30% to 60%—but there is evidence that it can make COVID-19 worse, both from the earlier SARS epidemic and lab research. Like with so many things in medicine, we have to play the odds.

Don’t go to the emergency room or urgent care unless you are severely ill. There will be sick people there, and you might catch something. You also might end up with a big bill, say for a CT scan you didn’t really need. And if you have the flu or a cold or COVID-19, and don’t need IV fluids or oxygen, they can’t do anything for you. Telephone advice lines could help greatly.

Don’t go to events that are crowded, especially indoors in poorly ventilated rooms. Staying home is good.

Don’t demand to be tested and rely on the results. The tests are still in short supply and not very accurate. If you are at low risk, a positive test is likely to be a false positive. And if you are infected, the test may be negative at first. We need much more testing—mainly for public health monitoring.

Don’t waste. Expired medications are probably still good. Most drugs or essential ingredients are made in China, and supplies are running out. Masks (also mostly made in China) are meant to be disposable, but likely can’t be replaced (see below).

Don’t touch your face or your eyes. That is very hard—preventing that is one function of a mask and eye protection.

Don’t fall for internet scams, or malware. Hucksters will always be around to try to profit from panics. A new type of malicious virus is embedded malware in sites that come up on a search for information. (If you want to find the Johns Hopkins University dashboard of cases and deaths, go to the university’s website, don’t Google “coronavirus map.”)

Now for some dos:

Do prepare to take care of yourself and your family. Be sure you have a fever thermometer, disposable gloves, plastic garbage bags, and cleaning supplies. A pulse oximeter, available in many places for around $40, is good to have to check oxygen levels.

Do clean and disinfect surfaces such as doorknobs, telephones, computer keyboards, toilets, and countertops often. Virus can persist there for days.

Do remember that sunlight is the best disinfectant. If you don’t have a pocket ultraviolet lamp (they are or were available on amazon), try putting things like masks or paper currency out in the sun. The idea should be rigorously tested, but in times of need, you may have to guess.

Do wash your hands often and use hand sanitizer. With SARS-CoV-2, most disinfectants work, including 70-percent-alcohol-based sanitizers.

Do put a mask on sick people if you can. For protecting yourself you need a minimum of an N95 mask and eye protection.

Do take your vitamins. Most people may be vitamin D deficient. Your need for vitamin C escalates with infection. Some 50 tons of vitamin C was shipped to Wuhan, and studies of effectiveness are underway.

Do get your essential prescriptions refilled for 90 days—the supply chain depends on China. If your managed-care plan won’t pay, consider paying cash. You may be able to get a good price with a coupon from goodrx.com.

Do protect your immune system, with adequate sleep, exercise, fresh air, and diet, especially avoiding sugar if you feel ill.

Do help your neighbors, and be responsible about protecting others as well as yourself from contagion.

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Jane M. Orient, M.D. obtained her undergraduate degrees in chemistry and mathematics from the University of Arizona in Tucson, and her M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1974. She completed an internal medicine residency at Parkland Memorial Hospital and University of Arizona Affiliated Hospitals and then became an Instructor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine and a staff physician at the Tucson Veterans Administration Hospital. She has been in solo private practice since 1981 and has served as Executive Director of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS) since 1989. She is currently president of Doctors for Disaster Preparedness. She is the author of YOUR Doctor Is Not In: Healthy Skepticism about National Healthcare, and the second through fifth editions of Sapira’s Art and Science of Bedside Diagnosis published by Wolters Kluwer. She authored books for schoolchildren, Professor Klugimkopf’s Old-Fashioned English Grammar and Professor Klugimkopf’s Spelling Method, published by Robinson Books, and coauthored two novels published as Kindle books, Neomorts and Moonshine. More than 100 of her papers have been published in the scientific and popular literature on a variety of subjects including risk assessment, natural and technological hazards and nonhazards, and medical economics and ethics. She is the editor of AAPS News, the Doctors for Disaster Preparedness Newsletter, and Civil Defense Perspectives, and is the managing editor of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons.

Famous People Who’ve Contracted Coronavirus COVID-19



Several famous people have contradicted the novel Coronavirus, COVID-19

US actor Tom Hanks, the wife of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Arsenal coach Mikel Arteta are among the rich and famous infected by the coronavirus:

Entertainers

Tom Hanks and his wife, actress and singer Rita Wilson, are the first Hollywood stars to announce they are infected. They have been placed in quarantine in a Gold Coast hospital in Australia. Hanks has urged the public to heed the advice of experts.

Best-selling Chilean writer Luis Sepulveda, who lives in northern Spain, has also been infected, showing symptoms of the new Coronavirus in February, after he had returned to his home from a literary festival in neighbouring Portugal.

Sport

England’s football Premier League, the richest in the world, is badly affected: Arsenal’s Spanish manager Arteta and Chelsea winger Callum Hudson-Odoi, who is British, have both contracted the coronavirus.

Italian football team Juventus has announced that one of their players, defender Daniele Rugani, has tested positive.

French basketball player Rudy Gobert has become the first US National Basketball Association player to test positive, prompting the NBA to abruptly suspend the season.

Utah Jazz star Gobert has apologised for potentially exposing people to the coronavirus, after triggering scorn on social media for pointedly touching every microphone and voice recorder on a table in front of him at a media availability on Monday.

A second Utah player, Donovan Mitchell, has also been confirmed to have tested positive for COVID-19.

Colombian cyclist Fernando Gaviria, is doing well after being admitted to hospital in the United Arab Emirates 10 days ago.

Politicians –

Canadian premier Trudeau has been placed in isolation for two weeks after his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau tested positive.

Spain’s equality minister Irene Montero has tested positive and has been quarantined along with her partner, deputy prime minister and radical left Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias.

French Culture Minister Franck Riester is staying in his Paris home after contracting the coronavirus earlier this week.

British MP Nadine Dorries, a minister in the health department who helped craft the legislation to fight the bug, has tested positive, the first British politician to do so.

Several senior officials in Iran have been infected, including Vice President Massoumeh Ebtekar and Iraj Harirchi, deputy health minister.

Australian Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, has entered hospital quarantine after being infected. He recently met Ivanka Trump, the daughter and aide of US President Donald Trump.

Fabio Wajngarten, a top aide to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has tested positive for the disease following a trip on which both met with the US president. Bolsonaro is awaiting results of his own test.

Reprinted with permission -France AFP

Coronavirus Canceled Spring Break? Make It A Family Travel Game At Home

Now that the coronavirus has hit pandemic level, a lot of families who may have planned Spring Break trips are seriously considering canceling their plans.

If you are in that group of people, you should consider first reviewing your travel insurance policy though most of them exclude pandemics and epidemics. Fortunately, a lot of airlines, rail lines and other travel-related companies are being accommodating and allowing customers to postpone their trips. Some are permitting credit to be used on a future trip.

When a trip is canceled, and as school systems and workplaces start turning to telework, families will be spending a lot more time together.

Load up on the board games or get spring cleaning done early. Stay busy and don’t let cabin fever set in.

You can make the time home educational as well, if your child or children’s school do not have a system set up for online or distance learning. Invest in a globe and go Globe Trotting from home.

Spin the globe and close your eyes and stop it on one spot. Then head to Google and find out information about that place. Imagine what it would be like if you land on a spot in South America.

It is currently summertime in the lower regions of that continent, and holiday travel can involve beautiful idyllic beaches, with winter swimming and snorkeling.

1. Rio de Janeiro with Pantanal Adventure

If you Google this location, you’ll note that there are tours that explore the city of Rio de Janeiro as well as the famed Copacabana Beach, the world’s tropical wetlands await at Pantanal. Some tours offer family trekking adventure, where you could see  marsh deer, giant otters, jaguars, anacondas, toucans and a plethora of wildlife.

If you were to ever travel to this locale, and didn’t want to take too much cash with you, you could transfer money to Brazil from the US to arrange for a special tour or excursion. You might find that there are things do that were not originally planned.

2. The Galapagos Islands

Another popular destination in South America is the Galapagos Islands. Activities in this location include snorkeling off the shores of these islands, which are filled with abundant flora and fauna. Travelers can head to Isla Lobos to watch the sea lions eat their meals. Kicker Rock is the place to swim with turtles. They can spot tropical fish and perhaps even some sharks at what is left of an underwater volcano.

Another plus of this destination is a volcano that is situated on land, Sierra Negra Volcano. Going higher, you’ll the landscape change from green to the look of the moon. It has a caldera that is seven miles wide, one of the largest in the world.

3. Patagonia

Visitors can hang out with the penguins at the bottom of South America. It begins in the plains of Argentina, passes through Chile and reaches to the edge of the world. Hike around Magdalena Island to see Magellanic penguins; your family will enjoy these birds in tuxedos, while getting some outdoor exercise.

4. Cusco in Peru

This ancient city is fun to explore with kids; it has an historic center that is blocked off to traffic.

Machu Picchu is the big attraction here. Visitors can take a bus up to the citadel and then take the bus back to town. Buy your Machu Picchu tickets in advance. Your kids can roam around, and you can enjoy the views while taking pictures and selfies.

Traveling to South America during the holidays provides a change of pace for families that spend abundant time in front of the computer, on their phones and in front of television. Being outdoors in nature as well as discovering new countries and cultures offers a refreshing break, especially during the stress and craziness of holiday shopping and gatherings.

Whether immersed in exotic wildlife, watching for toucans or enjoying a relaxing day snorkeling on the beaches of Rio de Janeiro, your kids would learn about travel in South America