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lego

Verdict Is In: The Lego Brick Fest LIVE is Lit!

Looking for a spectacular fun event to take your Lego-fanatic kid to? Look no further than the traveling Lego Brick Fest expo!

We got  chance to explore the fantastic exhibit when it made a pit stop in Baltimore, Maryland this year.

Blogger reviewer Zach and his pals headed down to the Maryland State Grounds in Timonium to check out all the fabulous things in store for attendees: building zones, miniature golf, robotics, an area for the youngest builders, a glow city filled with structures made out of glow-in-the-dark Legos, a magnanimous wall to build structures on, a brick sandbox, a speedway to race Lego vehicles, a theater area with plays and more.

The kids marveled at the  giant floor puzzle was amazing!

 

Lego mosaic artwork is situated throughout the exhibit.

There is also marvelous architecture and other life side structures to admire.

There are also plenty of photo oops for your family.

The boys enjoyed the gaming area as well!

The Tour continues. Future stops include : New York City, the San Francisco Bay Area, Houston, Texas, Philadelphia, Charleston and Queens, NYC. Get your tickets today if you live in one of these areas! Your kid will love you for it.  

Save Tons on Christmas Toys with this Toy Subscription Box

pley app

These days, you can rent about anything. From clothes, to handbags to appliances and now with the Pley app, you can rent toys!

With Christmas creeping around the corner, many parents know that all the toys they purchase for their children are usually abandon within months if not weeks after the Holidays are over.

That is a lot of money down the drain, but here is where toy rental maybe come in handy.

Pley will send your kids ordinarily expensive and the coolest toys but you get to send them back and get a new one when the novelty wears off.

It makes sense when you think about it. Kids only play with toys for a certain amount of time before abandoning them to the bottom of the toy chest. Those toys stay there until they get crushed by the weight of the toys on top of it or it’s time to go to the Goodwill to clean out the toy room.

The company was started by a parent, Ranan Lachman, who wanted his kids to spend less time in front of digital screens and more time enriching their creativity and minds with LEGO® play.  After he and his wife spent thousands of dollars getting new LEGO toys, they invented Pley to avoid breaking the bank.

Leveraging the sharing economy, Pley makes it possible for families to save as much as 70% on toys that tend to be short-lived, eliminates clutter while reducing waste.

Pley also donates a toy to underprivileged child for every new member. Nice!

Check out Pley and consider signing up today!

 

 

Exploring LEGO’s Decision to Buck the Trend and Stick with Gender-Specific Toys

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In the current world we live in, a lot of parents are rejecting gender-limiting toys and I think we all can agree that LEGO company has taken the brunt of a lot of the animosity from modern parenting culture.

It has to do with the fact that while a lot of toy companies were giving up on long-held preconceptions about gender-specific products, LEGO when the other way, shed its gender-neutral past, and started creating toys targeted specifically at either girls or boys. LEGO said it had a good reason for separating the products.

The consumer website Consumerist broke down 5 lessons it learned from observing LEGOs model:

1. An Untapped Market: In 2008, LEGO looked at global data about who was buying their toys. It turns out, that roughly 90% of LEGO sets sold were bought for boys, meaning that nearly half the kid population wasn’t using their products.

“Seeing that the play pattern was really skewing so heavily toward boys, we wanted to understand why,” company spokesperson Michael McNally said. “We embarked on four years of global research with 4,500 girls and their moms. Some of the things we heard were really surprising and challenging in ways that weren’t really comfortable for us as a brand.”

2. Getting To The Bottom Of It: After finding that its toys were mostly sold to boys, the company set out to find out why that was.

Over four years, LEGO conducted global research with 4,500 girls and their moms. The company found some surprising and challenging themes in the way their toys were perceived, McNally tells The Atlantic.

LEGO tells The Atlantic that children in its focus groups consistently had distinct ideas about how to interact with the same toys they encountered, and that expectations seemed to be drawn along gender lines in focus group after focus group, even when those children were very young.

3. Boys & Girls May Use Same Toys, But Play Differently: The most important aspect LEGO says it found was that children play with the same toys very differently.

In one project, the company asked separate groups of boys and girls to build a LEGO castle. While both groups worked together to build the castle, they took different approaches to play afterward.

For example, the boys immediately grabbed the figures, the houses, and the catapults and started having a battle, McNally recalled, noting that the boys used the castle as a backdrop for their play.

On the other hand, the girls were more focused on the castle itself.

“They all looked around inside the castle and they said, ‘Well, there’s nothing inside,’” McNally said. “This idea of interior versus exterior in the orientation of how they would then play with what they built was really interesting. If you think about most of the LEGO models that people consider to be meant for boys, there’s not a whole lot going on in there. But [the girls had] this idea of, ‘There’s nothing inside to do.’”

Overall, the groups of children both expressed interest in the building aspect, but the following interaction showed girls overwhelmingly wanted to build environments and more details in their toys.

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