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Internet Sleuths Figured Out Drake and Sophie Brussaux Celebrated Son’s 2nd Birthday Together

 



Internet sleuthing fans and the media figured out that rapper Drake and his ex Sophie Brussaux celebrated their son Adonis’ 2nd birthday together at Drizzy‘s Toronto mansion.

He posted a photo from the celebration event on his Instagram page which showed off large mylar balloons spelling out his son’s name with a tiny art rendering of Sesame Street character Elmo in the corner.

“Happy Birthday King ?”, he captioned the photo.

Around that same time, Brussaux posted the same photo and an outside portrait of herself standing in front of a floral Sesame Street charter Cookie Monster display in front of the outside of the mansion.

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Happy Birthday King ?

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on

On his actual birthday, the visual artist posted on her Instastory a throwback pic of herself in a bump-hugging black dress with the caption,“Today, it’s been 2 years I was having 50-sec contractions every 3 min for 24 hours man…all worth it.”

The visual artist added: “Only a handful of weeks left, over 200lbs. Looks like I’m carrying twins, but I swear I’m not.”

She is extremely private about her son with Drake and usually displays of her colorful oil paintings featuring landscapes, stills and portraits of celebrities like Angelina Jolie, Angela Bassett, Amy Winehouse, Leonardo DiCaprio, Michelle Obama and Beyoncé.

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A proud, PROUD, birthday mom ?

A post shared by Sophie Brussaux (@sophieknowsbetter) on

Drake Introduced the World to His Son, Adonis

Drake, Adonis and Sophie Brussaux
Drake, Adonis and Sophie Brussaux

Instagram: ChampagnePapi

Rapper Drake made news this weekend when he finally shared a photo of his now 2 1/2 year old son Adonis on his Instagram page.

In the series of photos he posted on his account, followers and fans get to admire the bright eyed, strawberry blonde curly haired adorable little boy who looks very much like Drake’s mom from the photos Drake also posted in the slideshow.

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What is most important for you right now is to connect to your own inner light. This will create the biggest opening of all. Trust that you have all of the power within to make this happen, and in order to do that connect to the people and things that bring you a lot of joy. When the mind starts to move into overthinking or fear, shift your attention right away to something bright. It doesn’t matter what has happened in the past or what is happening around us now, you can always make the choice to break free of the wheel of suffering and panic and open up to your own light. We are powerful manifestors , so once you make the choice in the moment to shift your awareness to something good, it will show you in your reality. Be conscious, especially right now of fears coming in from others, and recognize that not everything should be held by you. Laughter is your best medicine, but tears can also be a powerful release. Let go of any judgment you may have around that. Remember that you are never alone, and if you need to be reminded of that ask for support and it will show up. Everything comes down to intention, and even though there are conflicting energies circling around us you must KNOW…It will rebuild. But in order for that to happen, you have to do exactly that. Trust. You have the biggest heart and that is your greatest gift. It’s impossible to always control your surroundings, but when you shift the focus to how you want to feel, everything will conspire to assist you. I love and miss my beautiful family and friends and I can’t wait for the joyful day when we are all able to reunite. Until then please keep your lights on. ?

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Drake, real name Aubrey Graham, and his ex Sophie Brussaux , a former adult film star, are seen smiling in one posed photo with Adonis in the center.

The “Hotline Bling” performer had previously kept his child’s existence hidden until rapper Pusha T outed the news in a diss track.

When asked about the accusation that he hid his biological child in one interview, Drizzy said that he had sought a paternity test which was damaged in transit in the mail and had to be redone.

Speaking to Rap Radar, the God’s Plan rapper explained: ‘To be honest with you, I did a DNA test for my son and it came back to us and it said the DNA test got ruined in transit and they couldn’t be 100 percent sure that that was my son or not. ‘So, I was in a really weird pending situation where I didn’t want to go tell the world that that was my son and it wasn’t.’

He has since embraced fatherhood and in fact, seemingly decorated Adonis nursery in his newest home in a Hermes-theme.

Brussaux is now a successful artist and has created portraits of famous people like Barack Obama, Emma Watson, Angelina Jolie, and Beyonce.

According to her website, Sophie ‘combines her fascination for cultural and social paradigms with a love of colourful pop-art and symbolism’.

Drake/Pusha T Rap Beef: Would a Guy Denying His Son Do This? (PHOTO)

There is an innocent infant at the center of the latest rap battle between Drake and Kanye West GOOD label protege Pusha T.

If you care for the origins, you can find a timeline here.

The latest came from Pusha T who released a diss track asserting among many other things, like digs at Drake being abandoned by his own dad at age 5 and taunting death on a close friend and confidante of Drake’s who is suffering from the effects of advanced multiple Sclerosis, that Drake doesn’t acknowledge his own son.

But the fact is the fact the baby was conceived as a result of an 8-year on-again-off-again relationship with former French porn star turned surreal art painter named Sophie Brussaux, Drake has since conceded paternity. (Thanks to a Paternity Test)

Pusha T, the 41-year old rapper whose real name is Terrence LeVarr Thornton, takes shot at the couple’s baby on his diss track:

“Adonis is your son

And he deserves more than an Adidas press run, that’s real

Love that baby, respect that girl

Forget she’s a porn star, let her be your world, yuugh.”

The diss track is titled “The Story of Adidon” and apparently is in reference to an Adidas shoe line that will be named after Drake’s son, Adonis, and according to reports, will feature the young boy in the marketing campaign.

But as we blogged last October, Drake took his fans on a snap chat tour of his new home that included stops at the baby’s Hermès -themes baby nursery.

The family vacationed in Dubai and Brussaux has commented about how her son is living “the good life” at such a young age.

So the baby which was born on October 24, 2017, ironically on Drake’s birthday,  isn’t really being denied but perhaps kept in private for now.

There is a difference.

And for Wayback Wednesday purposes, below is a Snippet of our last October post:

Although Toronto rapper Drake denied that a   fling with model and former porn star Sophie Brussaux resulted in a pregnancy, a paternity test later, and there are reports out that he has set up a neutral Hermes-themed infant nursery and playroom in the multi-million dollar mansion he has been building in his home town.

Over the weekend, October’s Very Own took his followers on an MTV Cribs like tour of the digs. What caught people’s eye were the stops along the way that featured a pretty swanky gender neutral playroom.

Inside Rapper Drake’s Baby Nursery (PHOTOS)

Although Toronto rapper Drake denied that a   fling with model and former porn star Sophie Brussaux resulted in a pregnancy, a paternity test later, and there are reports out that he has set up a neutral Hermes-themed infant nursery and playroom in the multi-million dollar mansion he has been building in his home town.

Over the weekend, October’s Very Own took his followers on an MTV Cribs like tour of the digs. What caught people’s eye were the stops along the way that featured a pretty swanky gender neutral playroom.

Meanwhile, Brussaux has been enjoying her pregnancy and getting showered by family and friends recently. Oh and it’s a baby boy!

The baby should be here by now because she posted on September 19 that it was three weeks to due date so….

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Ok so about 3 weeks away from delivery date ???, my body has expanded beyond anything I could imagine, see the before and after ?… 35lbs extra and counting ??‍?. But I managed to dodge stretch marks thanks to a great homemade belly balm recipe given on a French aromatherapy website (@aromazone_officiel pour ceux qui connaissent), and it's way more efficient than any of these expensive creams you can buy that are full of water (which makes them cheaper to make). You need oily substances to prevent the skin from cracking. I wrote the recipe in English (3rd picture), but you'll have to convert the millimeters and grams into something you understand lol. Also drink a lot of water, and pray your genetics don't betray you…but my mom had crazy stretch marks and I don't have one yet ??. Rub at least twice a day from the beginning of the pregnancy but especially at the end. I hope it helps a few of you as much as it helped me ?

A post shared by Sophie B. (@sophieknowsbetter) on

 

Things Just Got More Real with Ex Porn Star Claiming She’s Having Drake’s Baby

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Drake is fielding paternity questions after former porn star Sophie Brussaux claims she’s 3 1/2 months pregnant with his child, reports TMZ.

The Passionfruit singer was spotted hanging out with Brussaux at a Japanese restaurant in Amsterdam on January 24, right after his split with J-Lo, but his reps have called BS on the pregnancy rumors.

In fact, Drake’s team have taken a rather icky line of defense and basically taken to slut-shaming the former adult film star saying that he credibility is shot to sh-t because she’s had “multiple relationships.”

“This woman has a very questionable background,” one of Drake’s reps reportedly told TMZ. “She has admitted to having multiple relationships. We understand she may have problems getting into the United States. She’s one of many women claiming he got them pregnant.

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How COVID will Change Parenting

family

I am reposting and updating a post I did in the past about how the new decade will change for parenting. I believe now that the COVID era will be additionally instrumental in the way people parent their children because by the time we get over this pandemic, more of us will become experts in home schooling.

Here is the post again. Enjoy!

Now that I’ve reviewed the parenting trends of the past, from a celebrity perspective, let’s take a look at the top parenting trends that we can expect in the coming decade.

From Helicopter to Free Range Parenting, child raising techniques and patterns change over time, with each generation and with scholarship and research.

There really is no right way to accomplish this fine craft and art of raising decent human beings from newborns to young adult.

However, each generation adopts varying habits and patterns that mark their eras in distinctive ways.

The Millennial Generation has already established itself as separate and almost the anti-Generation of its Gen X and Baby Boomer generations that precedes it.

One report indicates that 82% of babies born each year is to Millennial moms, so here is how this new generation of parents are creating new trends for the next decade.

1.More traveling with baby and small children

Parents will be less timid about taking their babies and small children with them while traveling the world.

The concept of traveling with children is not new but was limited to trips to Disney world or roadtrips in the Summer to the Grand Canyon.  Of course, we always had those bold wanderlust or Peace Corp types of parents who were never fearful about picking up their toddler and heading to the Andes but they were in the minority.

A new report by Resonance Consultancy points to the increasing importance of Millennials to the family travel market.

Travel Agents Report states that “44 percent of Millennial travelers take their vacations with the kids in tow,” according to the firm’s new Future of U.S. Millennial Travel report.

More than half (58%) of U.S. Millennials who traveled overnight last year have children under the age of 18 in the household, Resonance learned.

Once kids enter the picture, Millennial parents continue to travel.

Now and in the future, millennial parents will not even hesitate to do so. Many are open to the idea of home schooling their children while living and working as digital nomads abroad. They do not think a child necessarily needs in-school instructions. As a result, we will see more children grow up as students of the world.

The well traveled child is the future.

2. Making home made baby food

In the last decade alone, American spending on baby food has dropped dramatically, and there’s a growing emphasis on making baby food at home.

Millennial parents have grown up in the age of information, and generally speaking, it shows.

They’re not feeding their kids the super-processed, questionably-nutritious baby and kid food of yore, and they want to maintain their principles of eco-minded, earth- and animal-friendly living once they become parents.

And according to Forbes, newer baby food brands are catering to them by partnering up with nutritionists and food engineers to offer sustainable biodynamic food sourcing and processes.

Because Millennial parents of all economic classes want nutritious, organic, science-backed food for their babies , their babies Generation Alpha will be the best fed kids.

3. More Baby wearing, Less investment in multiple strollers

Not long ago, the stroller was a status symbol. Posh parents would have purchased more than two strollers by the time their child reached Kindergarten: a baby carriage or infant car system, a jogging stroller and a toddler stroller.

Nowadays, it’s all about baby-wearing. Also, newer parents have less income and are interested in sustainable living, less waste and extravagance. They do not rely on things like strollers to make a statement.

The term “babywearing” was coined by William Sears, a California-based pediatrician who in 1992 wrote “The Baby Book,” which popularized the concept of “attachment parenting.”

Along with co-sleeping and extended breast-feeding, baby carrying is a core tenet of that parenting approach, which is supposed to nurture a closer attachment between parent and baby and ultimately a healthier child.

The future of parenting is more engaged and connected parents and baby wearing is part of that.

4. Single by Choice/More cohabitation before marriage or without plans to ever marry

Beginning with Generation X, women have been willing to have babies on their own, or elect to just co-habitate with a partner and skip getting married altogether. However, most eventually bowed to societal pressure to find the one, exchange vows and have kids.

Future parents are not willing to be handcuffed by societal rules and tradition.

In 2009, the oldest millennials were in their 20s and as The Wall Street Journal reports, of those older millennials who did have kids, most were unmarried.

And generally, what is norm has changed.

A Pew report finds that just 46% of kids in 2016 were living in a household with two married parents in their first marriage, compared to 61% in 1980.

Generation Z is coming up behind the Millenial generation and are said to be more financially savvy,  the next era of parents will be even less constrained by standards of traditional practices.

Their family planning practices will reflect this prediction.

5. More demanding about Parental Leave

Dads in the Generation Y are also leading the charge in changing gender-based roles in the home, and likewise will change policies related to parental leave.

Millennial dads are more likely to take paternity leave after their spouses or partners have a child.  They are also more likely to be stay at home dads and to baby wear.

A Business Insider report states that “millennial dads are far more likely than their fathers were to take time off work after the birth of a baby” and quotes a 2016 Cornell University study  which asserts that dads who take longer paternal leave tend to be more engaged and involved with their kids in the long run.

That same report indicated that “in 1989, only 10% of these stay-at-home parents were dads, whereas today, stay-at-home fathers account for 17% of such caregivers” and noted that while “women still account for the vast majority of parents in this role, but the numbers are on a course toward more balance.”

Further,it states that in many dual-income millennial homes in which both parents work full time (that’s 46% of households, according to Pew), the mother is the primary earner.

They are making private companies and the government adjust to this new dynamic.

Millennial parents have influenced employers such as Microsoft and Netflix to announce significant expansions to their paid parental leave benefits.

As more private companies start to offer extended family leave and generous paternity leave, future parents from up and down the socioeconomic ladder will start expecting and even demanding adequate time off after welcoming a child to the family.

They will also be more likely to support laws or support candidates that propose new laws standardizing and expanding parental leave policies and laws.

6. More Social Media – Less Friends/Family as Advice Source

Parents will be more comfortable about sharing photos of their children in social media and some with actually brand their children from birth, similar to the way celebrities do now.

About 4 in 5 millennials admit to posting a picture of their kid online at least once, according to a poll conducted by TIME and Survey Monkey. Half of baby boomers, meanwhile, have never posted a photo of their kids online, as well as 30% of Gen X parents.

A Business Insider report about how Millennials use their children as status symbols state they are spending up to $100,000 on things like Instagram-worthy nurseries.

Month-by-Month posts for the first  year of a baby’s life and fabulous color coordinated themed first birthday parties are a thing that Instagram following are made of!

Being that the new generation of parents are more digital conscious and aware, they will continue to skip friends and family for advice and turn to Google.

A recent New York Times article states that millennial parents go to Google, chat rooms, and apps for parenting advice and as one expert told the paper, “Google is the new grandparent, the new neighbor, the new nanny.”

7. Creative Names and Less Formal Names with History and Meaning

“Finding a name that has authentic roots, but is completely undiscovered, is the ultimate baby name status symbol,” Pamela Redmond Satran, a founder of the site Nameberry and author of “The Nameberry Guide to Off-the-Grid Baby Names,” told Alex Williams of The New York Times.

The future of parenting will include names that are not necessarily connected to a family or tradition.

In fact, more Millennial parents are reportedly looking for a name that is not already attached to a domain.

Also, that New York Times article mentions that many millennial parents are giving their kids personal hashtags and YouTube channels.

8. Raising Gender Neutral Children

With more awareness of LGBTQ issues and variances of how members of that community identify, modern and Millennial parents are cognizant about how they label their children. In year’s past, we followed strict gender identity and roles. To put it bluntly, children were either male or female. However, in the coming years, more parents will be open with raising children without subjecting them to or assigning them gender identity.  Future parents may be more likely to let their kids determine for themselves how they want to identify.

A Euromonitor international report states that middle class parents in developed world, especially older Millennials who are becoming parents, are taking a more gender-neutral approach to child raising, using neutral colors and with names suitable for either gender proving popular.

9. Less Religious – More Spiritual or Non Religious

A lot of holidays in secular society have become so homogenized and commercial that it is very easy for a child raised in a non-religious household to not feel left out. Christmas, Easter even Halloween and Day of the Dead which have cultural and spiritual origins are practiced and recognized by people who do not go to Church or follow the initial practices of each holiday.

Four in ten millennials now say they are religiously unaffiliated, according to the Pew Research Center. In fact, millennials (those between the ages of 23 and 38) are now almost as likely to say they have no religion as they are to identify as Christian.

10. They will do what feels right to them 

If any of the aforementioned are clues, the next generation of parenting will go with their gut and not abide by what books, society, the media, the government or advertisers tell them.

In fact, they will be the one dictating what these ancient institutions do!

The next era of parents will be more empowered.

The future is here and it’s going to be quite different!

 

10 Ways Parenting Will Be Different in the New Decade {Predictions}

family

family

Now that I’ve reviewed the parenting trends of the past, from a celebrity perspective, let’s take a look at the top parenting trends that we can expect in the coming decade.

From Helicopter to Free Range Parenting, child raising techniques and patterns change over time, with each generation and with scholarship and research.

There really is no right way to accomplish this fine craft and art of raising decent human beings from newborns to young adult.

However, each generation adopts varying habits and patterns that mark their eras in distinctive ways.

The Millennial Generation has already established itself as separate and almost the anti-Generation of its Gen X and Baby Boomer generations that precedes it.

One report indicates that 82% of babies born each year is to Millennial moms, so here is how this new generation of parents are creating new trends for the next decade.

1.More traveling with baby and small children

Parents will be less timid about taking their babies and small children with them while traveling the world.

The concept of traveling with children is not new but was limited to trips to Disney world or roadtrips in the Summer to the Grand Canyon.  Of course, we always had those bold wanderlust or Peace Corp types of parents who were never fearful about picking up their toddler and heading to the Andes but they were in the minority.

A new report by Resonance Consultancy points to the increasing importance of Millennials to the family travel market.

Travel Agents Report states that “44 percent of Millennial travelers take their vacations with the kids in tow,” according to the firm’s new Future of U.S. Millennial Travel report.

More than half (58%) of U.S. Millennials who traveled overnight last year have children under the age of 18 in the household, Resonance learned.

Once kids enter the picture, Millennial parents continue to travel.

Now and in the future, millennial parents will not even hesitate to do so. Many are open to the idea of home schooling their children while living and working as digital nomads abroad. They do not think a child necessarily needs in-school instructions. As a result, we will see more children grow up as students of the world.

The well traveled child is the future.

2. Making home made baby food

In the last decade alone, American spending on baby food has dropped dramatically, and there’s a growing emphasis on making baby food at home.

Millennial parents have grown up in the age of information, and generally speaking, it shows.

They’re not feeding their kids the super-processed, questionably-nutritious baby and kid food of yore, and they want to maintain their principles of eco-minded, earth- and animal-friendly living once they become parents.

And according to Forbes, newer baby food brands are catering to them by partnering up with nutritionists and food engineers to offer sustainable biodynamic food sourcing and processes.

Because Millennial parents of all economic classes want nutritious, organic, science-backed food for their babies , their babies Generation Alpha will be the best fed kids.

3. More Baby wearing, Less investment in multiple strollers

Not long ago, the stroller was a status symbol. Posh parents would have purchased more than two strollers by the time their child reached Kindergarten: a baby carriage or infant car system, a jogging stroller and a toddler stroller.

Nowadays, it’s all about baby-wearing. Also, newer parents have less income and are interested in sustainable living, less waste and extravagance. They do not rely on things like strollers to make a statement.

The term “babywearing” was coined by William Sears, a California-based pediatrician who in 1992 wrote “The Baby Book,” which popularized the concept of “attachment parenting.”

Along with co-sleeping and extended breast-feeding, baby carrying is a core tenet of that parenting approach, which is supposed to nurture a closer attachment between parent and baby and ultimately a healthier child.

The future of parenting is more engaged and connected parents and baby wearing is part of that.

4. Single by Choice/More cohabitation before marriage or without plans to ever marry

Beginning with Generation X, women have been willing to have babies on their own, or elect to just co-habitate with a partner and skip getting married altogether. However, most eventually bowed to societal pressure to find the one, exchange vows and have kids.

Future parents are not willing to be handcuffed by societal rules and tradition.

In 2009, the oldest millennials were in their 20s and as The Wall Street Journal reports, of those older millennials who did have kids, most were unmarried.

And generally, what is norm has changed.

A Pew report finds that just 46% of kids in 2016 were living in a household with two married parents in their first marriage, compared to 61% in 1980.

Generation Z is coming up behind the Millenial generation and are said to be more financially savvy,  the next era of parents will be even less constrained by standards of traditional practices.

Their family planning practices will reflect this prediction.

5. More demanding about Parental Leave

Dads in the Generation Y are also leading the charge in changing gender-based roles in the home, and likewise will change policies related to parental leave.

Millennial dads are more likely to take paternity leave after their spouses or partners have a child.  They are also more likely to be stay at home dads and to baby wear.

A Business Insider report states that “millennial dads are far more likely than their fathers were to take time off work after the birth of a baby” and quotes a 2016 Cornell University study  which asserts that dads who take longer paternal leave tend to be more engaged and involved with their kids in the long run.

That same report indicated that “in 1989, only 10% of these stay-at-home parents were dads, whereas today, stay-at-home fathers account for 17% of such caregivers” and noted that while “women still account for the vast majority of parents in this role, but the numbers are on a course toward more balance.”

Further,it states that in many dual-income millennial homes in which both parents work full time (that’s 46% of households, according to Pew), the mother is the primary earner.

They are making private companies and the government adjust to this new dynamic.

Millennial parents have influenced employers such as Microsoft and Netflix to announce significant expansions to their paid parental leave benefits.

As more private companies start to offer extended family leave and generous paternity leave, future parents from up and down the socioeconomic ladder will start expecting and even demanding adequate time off after welcoming a child to the family.

They will also be more likely to support laws or support candidates that propose new laws standardizing and expanding parental leave policies and laws.

6. More Social Media – Less Friends/Family as Advice Source

Parents will be more comfortable about sharing photos of their children in social media and some with actually brand their children from birth, similar to the way celebrities do now.

About 4 in 5 millennials admit to posting a picture of their kid online at least once, according to a poll conducted by TIME and Survey Monkey. Half of baby boomers, meanwhile, have never posted a photo of their kids online, as well as 30% of Gen X parents.

A Business Insider report about how Millennials use their children as status symbols state they are spending up to $100,000 on things like Instagram-worthy nurseries.

Month-by-Month posts for the first  year of a baby’s life and fabulous color coordinated themed first birthday parties are a thing that Instagram following are made of!

Being that the new generation of parents are more digital conscious and aware, they will continue to skip friends and family for advice and turn to Google.

A recent New York Times article states that millennial parents go to Google, chat rooms, and apps for parenting advice and as one expert told the paper, “Google is the new grandparent, the new neighbor, the new nanny.”

7. Creative Names and Less Formal Names with History and Meaning

“Finding a name that has authentic roots, but is completely undiscovered, is the ultimate baby name status symbol,” Pamela Redmond Satran, a founder of the site Nameberry and author of “The Nameberry Guide to Off-the-Grid Baby Names,” told Alex Williams of The New York Times.

The future of parenting will include names that are not necessarily connected to a family or tradition.

In fact, more Millennial parents are reportedly looking for a name that is not already attached to a domain.

Also, that New York Times article mentions that many millennial parents are giving their kids personal hashtags and YouTube channels.

8. Raising Gender Neutral Children

With more awareness of LGBTQ issues and variances of how members of that community identify, modern and Millennial parents are cognizant about how they label their children. In year’s past, we followed strict gender identity and roles. To put it bluntly, children were either male or female. However, in the coming years, more parents will be open with raising children without subjecting them to or assigning them gender identity.  Future parents may be more likely to let their kids determine for themselves how they want to identify.

A Euromonitor international report states that middle class parents in developed world, especially older Millennials who are becoming parents, are taking a more gender-neutral approach to child raising, using neutral colors and with names suitable for either gender proving popular.

9. Less Religious – More Spiritual or Non Religious

A lot of holidays in secular society have become so homogenized and commercial that it is very easy for a child raised in a non-religious household to not feel left out. Christmas, Easter even Halloween and Day of the Dead which have cultural and spiritual origins are practiced and recognized by people who do not go to Church or follow the initial practices of each holiday.

Four in ten millennials now say they are religiously unaffiliated, according to the Pew Research Center. In fact, millennials (those between the ages of 23 and 38) are now almost as likely to say they have no religion as they are to identify as Christian.

10. They will do what feels right to them 

If any of the aforementioned are clues, the next generation of parenting will go with their gut and not abide by what books, society, the media, the government or advertisers tell them.

In fact, they will be the one dictating what these ancient institutions do!

The next era of parents will be more empowered.

The future is here and it’s going to be quite different!