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The Research that Shows How Low-Income Kids Fare Better than Richer Ones

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The New York Times took a stab at analyzing the new PEW Research Center report about parenting in America which highlighted the growing opportunity and parenting gap when it comes to access to activities and how that impacts children’s likelihood for success.

Its piece titled “Class Differences in Child Rearing are On the Rise ”  includes an interview with author and University of Pennsylvania sociologist Annette Lareau whose note-worthy research points out the not-so-good things about over-scheduled children from middle class and affluent homes with highly-educated parents.

“Higher-income children are more likely to declare boredom and expect their parents to solve their problems,” Lareau said, adding during a segment on Michael Smerconish‘s radio show on SiriusXM this morning that these children are entitled, demanding, whine a lot and essentially experience what Lareau called “learned helplessness.”

Working-class children are happier, more independent, whine less and are closer with family member, said Lareau, whose groundbreaking research on the topic was published in her book “Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race and Family Life.”

It reminded me what a monk at my children’s old Catholic school once shared with our parent teachers association meeting about the differences he experienced when working with richer children versus ones from working-class homes.

At recess, he said, the kids from low-income homes would run off and grab balls, play hopscotch, engage in a game of tag and independently divide up into groups to play. They’d only return at the end of recess.

He said in schools where the children were often over scheduled and regularly attend organized planned play dates, when they were told to go play, many stood around waiting for instructions on how the play time will be organized. They were used to being closely monitored and supervised.

My husband and I certainly can relate. Lareau describes our kids behaviors and attitude, at times, to a tee.

We often have to force our children to go outside the house and play,  to go meet up with neighborhood friends to shoot some hoops at the local playground or to ride their bike and explore outdoors.

I remember growing up in a low-income neighborhood in Washington, DC  hanging with friends and playing outdoors until the street lights came on, which was the universal sign that it was time to come in.

So  it is true, “middle-class and higher-income parents see their children as projects in need of careful cultivation…and teach children to question authority figures and navigate elite institutions” which gives their children “the skills to navigate bureaucracies and succeed in schools and workplaces.”

However, there is something to be said about having street smarts, common sense and know-how of being resourceful, working with what you have and developing a sense of independence early in life.

In manufactured towns and communities where homes sit on 1/4 to 2 acre lots, neighbors are far from each other.  Consequently, their children can’t easily just run over to their friends’ home down the street, or interact with other kids from across the river and thereby, pick up some much needed grit, which is beneficial as well for developing coping skills.

Integration is beneficial to children from both ends of the socioeconomic spectrum, it turns out.

“People used to live near people of different income levels; neighborhoods are now more segregated by income,” writer Claire Caine Miller wrote in her NYT article.

“Children were not always raised so differently,” noted Sean F. Reardon, a professor in of poverty and equality in education, also in that NYT piece.

Reardon’s research also indicates that the achievement gap between children from high- and low-income families is 30 percent to 40 percent larger among children born in 2001 than those born 25 years earlier.

That is a shame. It’s true all walks of life need each other more, now more than ever.

What are your thoughts?

 

 

Sucking On a Milkshake Straw in McDonald’s Japan is like Breastfeeding 

Bellyitch Rewind 

You’ve heard plenty of times of the benefits of breastfeeding and apparently whoever created the straws that are given with McDonald’s milkshakes in Japan did too.

Mashable, citing RocketNews24 as its source, says McDonald’s Japan designed the straws to mimic the pace and experience of breastfeeding.

To support this claim, RocketNews24 points to a quote from McDonald’s Japan founder Den Fujita, who died in 2004.

“When humans drink something, the speed that produces the most delicious feeling is the speed at which babies nurse,” Fujita wrote in a book series called Den Fujita’s Business Strategies 2: Overwhelming Business Strategies.“McDonald’s straws are designed so that when used with a shake, the speed will be the same as that of an infant drinking breast milk.”

Interesting. Sad for you the only way to experience this to test out the theory is to go to Japan yourself.

It’s not available here in the US.

Income, Education, Race’s Impact On Parenting: PEW’s New Survey Confirms What We Already Suspect

pew parenting survey

The PEW Research Center released its 2015 Parenting in America survey this week which confirmed a lot of generalities and notions many of us probably have had about parenting, and how income, education, and sometimes race,  impact parenting choices, styles and fears.

The survey was conducted between September 15 and Oct. 13, 2015, among 1,807 U.S. parents with children younger than 18 and the findings yielded unsurprising results.

Here’s how it broke down:

Richer kids Have More Access to Enrichment Activities compared to Children in Lower-Income Households

No surprise, the survey found that higher income families children had access to more extracurricular activities and sports.

A little over half (52%) of families with incomes less than $30,000 said they struggle to find affordable, high-quality after-school activities and programs for their children, compared to those with incomes of $75,000 or higher (29%).

Consequently, more higher-income parents stated that their “children are engaged in sports or organizations such as the scouts or take lessons in music, dance or art. ” About 84% of richer parents answered that their children have “participated in sports in the 12 months prior to the survey; this compares with 59% among lower-income parents.”

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Parents from Low-Income Are More Fearful for the Safety of their Children

Lower income parents rated their neighborhoods as less safe. A third of parents who earn less than $30,000 rated their neighborhood as “fair” or a “poor” place to raise kids, compared to just 7% of parents who earn more than $75,000. Those richer parents gave their neighborhoods an “excellent” or “very good” rating (78% v 42%).

What worried parents from the lower-income brackets most was a fear that their children would be a victim of violence with  59% fearing their child may be kidnapped or attacked (55%). Also,  47% of those earning less than $30,000 worried that their kids may be shot at some point. That rate is double that of higher-income parents.

Lower-Income Feared their Children Might Get Pregnant or In Trouble with the Law At Some Point

Half of lower-income parents worried that their daughter might become pregnant as a teenager compared to just 43% of higher-income parents. By a stark margin of 2-to-1, more lower-income parents compared to higher-income ones (40% v 21%) worried that their kids will get in trouble with the law at some point.

Concerns about teenage pregnancy and legal trouble are also more prevalent among lower-income parents. Half of lower-income parents worry that their child or one of their children will get pregnant or get a girl pregnant as a teenager, compared with 43% of higher-income parents. And, by a margin of 2-to-1, more lower-income than higher-income parents (40% vs. 21%) say they worry that their children will get in trouble with the law at some point.

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Living in a 2-Parent Household Made a Difference For Opportunities and Black Children in Single-Family Households Have Less Resources

In 2014, 31% of kids living in single-parent households lived below the poverty-line compared to only 1 in 10 or 21% of kids in  two cohabiting parents homes. Over half of children in two-parent households had incomes at 200% or up that were above the poverty line compared to just 21% of those in single-family homes.

And has been the trend recently, more Black children live in single-parent household in America than any other single race. Only 31% of Black children lived with two married parents while 54% lived in single-parent homes.  Meanwhile, 72% of White, 82% of Asian-American and 55% of Hispanic children lived with two married parents.

Spanking isn’t Popular for Discipline; But Education and Race Impacted Use of Spanking for Discipline

Only 4% of parents surveyed said they use spankings as a regular form or punishment. “The most popular is explaining why a child’s behavior is inappropriate: three-quarters say they do this often,” the Center reported.  “About four-in-ten (43%) say they frequently take away privileges, such as time with friends or use of TV or other electronic devices, and a roughly equal share say they give a “timeout” (41% of parents with children younger than 6) as a form of discipline, while about one-in-five (22%) say they often resort to raising their voice or yelling.”

Only 1 in 6 parents say they spank their children as a regular form of discipline. When it comes to using spanking as a discipline, generally, many parents across education, economic and racial groups describe using it at some point, though parents with just a high school education and black parents use it more.  Black parents (32%) are more likely than white (14%) and Hispanic (19%) parents to say they sometimes spank their children and are far less likely to say they never resort to spanking (31% vs. 55% and 58%, respectively), the Center reported.

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Parent Involvement Matter More for Black and Hispanic Parents

Despite what seems like a lot of negative associated with Black parents, they (and Hispanic parents) are more likely than White parents to believe that a parent can never be too involved with their children’s lives.

Even after controlling for educational attainment, 75% of Black and 67% of Hispanic parents said a parent can never be too involved win a child’s education compared to less than half of white parents (47%)

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Notwithstanding all of these differences, irrespective of income or race, most parents felt they were doing a good job, though Millennials, generally, more than other generation groups and moms more than dads, rated their jobs as parents high.  PEW reported:

Nearly identical shares of parents with incomes of $75,000 or higher (46%), $30,000 to $74,999 (44%) and less than $30,000 (46%) say they are doing a very good job as parents, and similar shares say they are doing a good job.

Though parental scorecards don’t differ by income, they do vary across other demographic divides, such as gender and generation. Among all parents, more mothers than fathers say they are doing a very good job raising their children (51% vs. 39%), and Millennial mothers are particularly inclined to rate themselves positively. Nearly six-in-ten (57%) moms ages 18 to 34 say they are doing a very good job as a parent, a higher share than Millennial dads (43%) or any other generational group.

Interesting findings. What are your thoughts about any of these stats?

RHOA’s Kandi Burruss got a TON of Baby Gifts for Her Son

kandi baby clothes

Woweee!!

As Real Housewives of Atlanta‘s Kandi Burruss and her husband Todd Tucker await the birth of their first child together, a son, they are also wading through tons of gifts for #BabyTucker.

The award-winning singer-songwriter shared a collage of all the presents that she has received for her second child. The biz mogul has a daughter, Riley, from a previous relationship. (Tucker has an 18-year old daughter, Kaela)

“So many people sent wonderful gifts for #BabyTucker that I needed help going thru it all,” she captioned the collage. “@mamajjoyce @carmoncambrice & Tracy are over here helping me go thru it all. Thanks for all the love everyone!”


Check out what else has been going on with Kandi.


REPORT: Zuckerberg, Mayer are Softening the Image of the Corporate CEO

mark-zuckerberg-diapers

 

 

This weekend, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg shared a photo of himself changing the diaper of his newborn daughter, Max. It was so cute.

This is a new way at looking at CEOs of big companies.

For a couple of years, there has been much chatter over the family planning efforts  Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, who gave birth to twins last week, and whose two pregnancies and previous birth experiences were the focus of a lot of articles, columns and conversations nation and worldwide.

zuckerberg mayer

Writer Jean McGregor of the Washington Post suggests that these two are part of a new era of corporate CEOs who share more and more about their personal lives than before, and perhaps it has to do with the fact they head tech companies which do things differently than traditional companies in the past.

But McGregor also hypothesizes that this new shift should be expected of  Zuckerberg and Mayer given their relatively young ages, 31 and 40, respectively, and both are at the stage in life when many are starting or growing their families.

Historically, CEOs are in their 50s with parenting being less a focus of their lives. But older CEOs too are being more open about intimate aspects of their lives, McGregor notes.

Last year, Tim Cook,who is 55,  penned a letter to the public announcing he was gay and Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini, 58,  shared openly about a near death accident, yoga and meditation, and wanting to spend more time with his wife and less at the beck and call of his employers.

“We program C.E.O.s to be certain kinds of people. We expect C.E.O.s to be on message all the time,” Bertolini told a New York Times reporter. “The grand experiment here has been how much of that do you really need to do?”

These could all be nothing more than examples of people who-whether in an attempt to inspire others, thank a family member or highlight their personal brand-chose to open up more than we’re accustomed to hearing from powerful people in the corporate suite, McGregor writes.

She notes, “and for every CEO who speaks freely, there’s one who chooses to keep an illness private. Mayer, for one, may be sharing the good news and basic details about her maternity leave (as she did with her first child in 2012), but it’s hardly a topic she’s dwelling on beyond that.”

Interesting.

REPORT: US Pregnancy & Abortion Rate Hit Record Low



The U.S. pregnancy rate and abortions have hit a record low, according to a new research by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and the Guttmacher Institute released Friday, NBC News reported.

“The pregnancy rate for women in the United States continued to decline in 2010, to 98.7 per 1,000 women aged 15-44, a record low for the 1976-2010 period. This level was 15 percent below the 1990 peak,” wrote researchers Sally Curtin and Joyce Abma of the NCHS and Kathryn Kost of the Guttmacher Institute.

Continue reading

From Examsnap to VMware: Hoarding the Right Practice Test Materials to Earn your VCP6-DCV Certification

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In the world of virtualization, VMware basically stands out. This goes out for its number of certifications, which have been highly regarded by both experts and new bies in IT.

Thus, VMware offers certifications of the associate (VCA), professional (VCP), advanced professional (VCAP), and design expert (VCDX) levels. One of the most recognized credential in virtualization and in IT, in general, which lies on the professional level is VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization (VCP6-DCV).

To obtain this VCP6-DCV certification, you must pass one of its foundation tests which include exams: vSphere 6 Foundations (2V0-620) and vSphere 6.5 Foundations (2V0-602). The second step that leads you to this credential is passing 2V0-621 test.

This article covers all you need to know about passing the VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization Exam simply known by code 2V0-602.

This exam tests your fundamental skills to manage vSphere 6.5 environments. To pass 2V0-602 exam you need to complete 70 questions of single and multiple choice within 105 minutes and to score 300 points. This test will cost you $125. So, if you have knowledge on how to administer a virtualized infrastructure using the latest technological practices, then that means you’re one step ready to take this exam.

Yet, best remember that no certification exam can be fully understood in one sitting. Likewise, no single material no matter how inclusive and informative it may be can give you everything you need to learn on a given exam. You always need other training materials so as to assess whether you are given the right information on the certification exam and its corresponding topics. The effort to scheme a preparation guide can be put in vain if you are not yet introduced to the right materials, to begin with. But having these on your lap doesn’t have to be a personal struggle. In order to lighten your work, we’ve collected a number of practice tests from different study resources that will assist you in preparing for and finally claiming your VPC6-DCV certification.

Examsnap’s Premium Bundle

Getting high marks in every exam can be challenging for most people. This indeed is a common outcry for those who have already taken the exam. Nonetheless, this should not discourage you. In case you don’t know, Examsnap is only a click away to encourage you with their variety of study materials. This ranges from exam training courses, study guide and a set of practice questions with answers. The files offered by this great platform are in ete format and can be opened with the used of the ETE Exam Simulator. This modern tool mirrors the real exam environment and helps you to get the insight of what is waiting for you at the exam. The more you practice answering Examsnap’s exam questions, the more you’ll gain familiarization and understanding of the certification exam. Among many individuals who take good advantage of these innovative, IT-verified materials are the test-takers of VMware 2V0-602 with the high hopes of securing the VCP6-DCV certification. The people who have already tried Examsnap know exactly which path leads to a more flexible and beneficial preparation route, and unsurprisingly, it all goes back to Examsnap.com.

VMware vSphere 6.5 Foundations Practice Test

You can’t say that you have fully prepared for the exam if you haven’t grabbed the chance to take VMware’s very own Official practice test for 2V0-602. Since this test sprung from VMware itself, you might as well try the practice test it has prepared. If other resources worry you out, VMware is the right path to place your trust. You can trust its credibility, its structure, and its very content. In addition, VMware professors have sprinkled their brilliance in the practice test. The knowledge engraved is monitored to be exactly connected to the exam objectives. Other study information that can be of use to you is also provided. This includes tips on preventing the most common mistakes many test-takers tend to commit.

ExamCollection’s Premium Bundle

With the number of materials coming in and out of the market, there’s probably no individual that can escape from an outdated and unreliable practice test. Just consider the hassle you have to endure in purchasing materials and later finding out its irregularities later on. For a future test-taker like you, no time should be squandered in settling for low-quality study materials. ExamCollection’s premium bundle for 2V0-602 exam lets you cut some slack. With its training course, its questions & answers, as well as its study guide, you can train more frequently until you attain mastery over the topics.

ExamSnap’s Practice Test

ExamSnap claims to give you a sure-fire way to pass 2V0-602 exam. Through its technically precise materials that are checked by certified experts, you’ll have even better chances in understanding the exam topics sooner than you have lingered. They’ve created a set of practice exams available in VCE format that convey real-life scenarios for the VMware vSphere 6.5 Foundations Exam. The files can be opened on the VCE Software and help you gain foundational skills that will be relevant to the actual exam and even after you get hired to your desired IT position. Moreover, ExamSnap regularly updates and tests their materials to keep its customers always in the loop.  

Exam-Labs’ Practice Testand dumps

Another common resource for practice questions and answers is Exam-Lab. This makes sure that the content provided in the practice tests covers the exact topics of the actual exam. Like the rest of the VMware 2V0-602 practice tests mentioned earlier, these are also checked by specialists in IT. To provide you more convenience, the practice test questions are also accessible in VCE file format.

Conclusion

Getting your own VCP6-DCV certification as well as passing 2V0-602 exam require from your efficient preparation. For that along with VMware official website visit Examsnap, ExamCollection, ExamSnap, and Exam-Labs. In choosing your training materials, having less or more can jeopardize you. Only pick in moderation but make sure to practice the materials as frequent as possible. This way, you’ll be able to concentrate on the materials that will surely help you become VMware certified professional.

Calm down KimYe Haters, the baby name ‘Saint’ Isn’t New

saint over time

Here is something for all the people hatin’ on Kim Kardashian –West and Kanye West’s son’s name, Saint. It isn’t unheard of or new even.

According to U.S. Social Security Administration statistics, in 2014, there were 32 baby boys born with the name “Saint”. Now that is out of 2 million babies born last year, making it rank 3, 413, but still.

And of all the states, Texas is way ahead of the curve because most of the children born last year named Saint were born in that state. Go Texas!

 

And there are and have been a few celebrities in history named Saint over time, as well.



We will be interested to see if there is an uptick in the name after this year! After all, Kim and Ye are trendsetters, whether you like them or not.



Data curated by PrettyFamous

STUDY: Pregnancy is the Most Traumatic Thing the Human Body Endures

pregnant-belly-stethoscope

File this also in the category, “No, Sherlock”

Pregnancy is the most traumatic condition the human body endures, a new Michigan University report states.

It’s harder than running a marathon even, according to the study which compared a post partum body’s recovery to an injured athletes’s recovery.

The researchers used MRI equipment that is usually used for sports industries and examined the full scope of trauma that a woman’s body experiences during childbirth.

Those images from their observations showed that close to 25% of women had fluid in the public bone marrow or fractures similar to those athlete often suffer. The results revealed that 41% of women had pelvic muscle tears.

These tears explain why your body takes longer than the typical and traditional 6 weeks recognized as the average recovery period.

“We have this thing where we tell women, ‘Well, you’re six weeks postpartum and now we don’t need to see you—you’ll be fine.’ But not all women feel fine after six weeks nor are ready to go back to work, and they aren’t crazy,”  University of Michigan School of Nursing associate professor Janis Miller told Mom.me, “Women with pelvic injuries often feel like something isn’t right, but they don’t understand why and can’t get answers from physicians.”

Such injuries can lead to bladder issues and organ prolapse. And no amount of Kegel exercises can fix that.

There are lessons in these findings for doctors and women. Physicians should not use a cookie-cutter approach when accessing post partum recovery and giving women the all-clear to return to pre-pregnancy activities; and new moms too should be aware they need more time to heal and not beat themselves or rush it.

h/t Mom.me

Continue reading more about recovery in HuffPost Parents UK.

 

STUDY: Big-Bottom Women Give Birth to Smarter Kids



Great news for us big booty gals!

A study from the University of Oxford links an ample derrière to healthy and smart children due to the high amount of Omega 3 fatty acids (the good fatty acids) stored in the bum. These are the same fatty acids that are responsible for the normal development of the baby’s brain.

And this news isn’t necessarily new either. Back in 2007,  Chicago Tribune noted research by scientists which stated that women with fat-bottoms are actually smarter than women with flat-bottoms. Again, for the same reason: heightened Omega 3 fatty acids storage in the booty improves the brain’s functionality and development.

These studies combine with evidence which shows that the fat content in a mother’s breast milk comes from the lower half of the body, which includes her thighs, buttocks, etc.  Given that is where the Omega 3’s are stored, babies with big bottomed moms get a healthy dosage of Omega 3 in their diet.

Fab news, says this ample bum gal! ha!

Read more about the research here!