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Parents: 4 Tips For Setting Screen Time Limits Pandemic

Photo by Julia M Cameron from Pexels

With a summer overshadowed by COVID-19, parents are taking a hard look at how to make the right decisions regarding their kids’ increased reliance on screens— which are helping to maintain a sense of normalcy during this socially-distanced time— while also finding the right balance with other important activities.

TV, streaming platforms, and app downloads have all seen notable in their use since the pandemic started, and children’s television viewing has also skyrocketed as parents across the world are increasingly turning to screens and technology to entertain and engage their kids.

To get further insights into kids’ screen time habits and behaviors during the pandemic, Brainly the world’s largest online learning community for students, parents, and teachers— surveyed 5,000 U.S. students (grades 6th-12th, ages 11-18) on its platform.

Some shocking insights were discovered. Consider this: About 25% of kids spend more than 9 hours every day looking at a screen. That screen time has led to just over 50% of students reporting headaches, soreness, and dry or irritated eyes. Since the pandemic began, students said they are spending at least 50% more time in front of screens daily.

Given the unprecedented situation we are facing which has brought on copious new challenges, the traditional boundaries and limits for screen time need to be reassessed.

So, how can parents handle screen time during the pandemic? Eric Oldfield, Chief Business Officer of Brainly and father of two school-age daughters, has a few tips for parents to consider when deciding the best course of action.

  • Not all screen time is created equal. It’s important for parents to assess how their child is spending their screen time with this in mind. Consuming content to gain information and get creative, as well as collaborating or socializing with their peers, is a great way for kids to maintain connections and continue learning during this unique time. However, time spent playing non-educational video games and watching mindless TV should be more closely monitored. 



  • Designate specific times the entire family unplugs. To avoid battles, it’s best to establish and communicate boundaries before your children start using devices, and sticking to those limits as much as possible. Children, especially younger ones, often crave structure, especially during unpredictable times. It’s still good, for instance, for everyone to eliminate screen use for at least one hour or two before bedtime to avoid impacting sleep cycles. 



  • Make sure screentime consumption is done healthily. Parents may want to consider having their children use blue screen glasses or switching their computer display screen settings to make sure their eyes are protected from harmful blue light. It’s also a good idea to ensure kids don’t sit too close to the screen, get up for a break at least once an hour, and sit with good posture while on the computer for hours on end doing schoolwork. 



  • Come up with a plan that makes sense for your children. As a parent, you know your child better than anyone else and are therefore the best person to decide what and how much media use is the right amount. Remember that screens are no longer the enemies of social interaction, learning, and productivity. Rather, they are enabling people around the world to work and learn and communicate with others during this uncertain time.

    The real enemies of healthy development in children are the same as adults: a sedentary lifestyle, social isolation, and distractions from schoolwork and learning. Using screens too much can contribute to all of these problems – but they can also counter them.  

  • The COVID-19 pandemic could last for a long time, so as families create new routines, it’s always best to focus on habits that are practical and sustainable. Above all else, don’t feel guilty about turning to screens more than you used to.

    Copy These Back to School Homeschool Workstation Set Ups

    Back to steal workstation idea 1

    Every year, I share a post on how to set up a homework station where work will get done.[ Read that post here].

    This year, now that more and more school systems across America and the globe have decided to continue distance learning, I think it is time we all step it up a notch and start being more deliberate, intentional and strategic about setting up a home school set up that works.

    I mean no more allowing your grown rug rats to study in the basement or in their rooms where there is a TV and video games there to distract them and keep them unfocused on the daily assignments.

    Also, no more leaving it up to them to schedule their work and break times.

    In real school, their teachers alot for scheduled breaks from instruction and you should too. So, I scoured the Internets and my Pinterest feed and came up with a few  workstations that you can copy and try to replicate this month before school officially launches next month.

    Check them out with affiliate links to sources where you can buy some of the items you’ll see in these dreamy set ups!

     

    If you have a small nook in your home that you can comfortably squeeze in a table and desk, do so because it’s ideal for removing distractions by having your child confined to the equivalent of a pod space so they can focus. I like the idea of a large chalkboard stationed above them that can be used to jot down drills, motivational words like in the above poster or their schedule.

    The rustic cannisters affixed to the wall in this set up are great for housing supplies like pens, pencils, sharpeners, rulers, etc so your child or children have no excuse to leave this space during instructional or homework time.  The closest thing I could find similar to achieve this similar set up were bathroom storage containers on Amazon for like $29.98 otherwise make do with pieces you already have at home.  If you’re handy, hammer a storage bin or affix one to the wall  using 3M command strips.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    Buy this Rustic Framed magnetic chalk board, 18″ x 22″ ($38.18)

    For people who live in small spaces and do not have a dedicated space away from distractions, you might want to set up your child’s work station in your dining room or eating area. Why is this a good idea? Because this space is usually an open area so you can keep an eye on them to make sure they are doing their work or watching their zoom or Google classroom instructions.

    Ideally, you have to use a wireless router or have a wired connection if you need to set up a computer, tablet or desktop in this space. But for the most part, sacrificing a corner of your dining room could be a great option.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    AmazonBasics Kids Solid Wood Table and 2 Chair Set ($79.99)

     

    It can be tempting to store items away to keep things looking neat but keeping supplies like art supplies- crayons, markers, paints, chalk, etc. in glass jars are great for making sure they are in mind and available to use as an option during instructional breaks in lieu of watching TV or gaming. That was the idea that blogger Tiffany of Raising Lemons had when she arranged her supplies on a shelf in her kitchen like this in this photo from her website. I love it!

    1 Gallon Anchor Hocking Glass Storage Heritage Hill Jar ($14.99)

     

    Ordinarily I would think that you need to be at a desk and in a chair to concentrate but when reading a book or scrolling a device doing research, it might just be better if your child is  in a comfortable seat and that’s where a big old bean bag chair may come in handy. We used to have a papasan and it was wonderful space for reading a good book. If you have unconventional seating somewhere in your home, drag it out into the work space or grab one online.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    Source

    Memory Foam Bean Bag Chair ($72.51)

    Now if you have the space and room for more furnishings, you might want to consider investing in a new multifunctional shelving unit that can accommodate baskets for holding binders, notebooks and other large items and a farm table with a bench. The larger table can allow your young scholar to spread out and situate various supplies, papers, and pens and more across a larger space. Some kids are messy and others just like to see their options sprawled out all over the place. A large farm style table will accomplish this.

    source

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    Farmhouse table and bench ($199.99)

    TRYING TO CONCEIVE THIS YEAR? DOWNLOAD MY FREE FERTILITY 100 EBOOK

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    source

    Collapsible Storage Bins ($19.99)

    IKEA Billy Bookshelf ($158)

     

    I think everything on any homeschool or distance learning station needs proper lighting. A nice standing lamp or a good desk lamp that varies in degree of illumination will be perfect. Whether your kid prefers to work in the early morning or the wee hours of the night like my kids do, they will need to be able to read their text and good lighting is part of that.

    Children’s Author’s 10 Tips For Managing Quarantine Life with Kids

     

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    LED Desk Lamp ($43.99)

    6 Self Care Tips While Working From Home

    In addition to a comfy lounge chair for reading, I think every child should be seated in a comfy office chair if possible that is good for their back.

    You don’t have to get a brand new chair either. I purchased most of our office chairs for our work spaces for five people from second hand online marketplaces like Facebook Marketplace. If it is within your budget, you should invest in a good quality chair with solid ergonomics. They’ll be occupying a lot of space at home working so they should be set up properly.

    The 3 Step Guide for Setting Up Your Quarantine Homeschool

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

     

    Ikea Swivel Chair ($149)

    No matter what you do, study your child’s habits from Spring semester and adjust the workstation to suit your child’s learning needs and habits. It can really make a difference as to whether you will have a successful fall semester or not.

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    How COVID will Change Parenting

    family

    I am reposting and updating a post I did in the past about how the new decade will change for parenting. I believe now that the COVID era will be additionally instrumental in the way people parent their children because by the time we get over this pandemic, more of us will become experts in home schooling.

    Here is the post again. Enjoy!

    Now that I’ve reviewed the parenting trends of the past, from a celebrity perspective, let’s take a look at the top parenting trends that we can expect in the coming decade.

    From Helicopter to Free Range Parenting, child raising techniques and patterns change over time, with each generation and with scholarship and research.

    There really is no right way to accomplish this fine craft and art of raising decent human beings from newborns to young adult.

    However, each generation adopts varying habits and patterns that mark their eras in distinctive ways.

    The Millennial Generation has already established itself as separate and almost the anti-Generation of its Gen X and Baby Boomer generations that precedes it.

    One report indicates that 82% of babies born each year is to Millennial moms, so here is how this new generation of parents are creating new trends for the next decade.

    1.More traveling with baby and small children

    Parents will be less timid about taking their babies and small children with them while traveling the world.

    The concept of traveling with children is not new but was limited to trips to Disney world or roadtrips in the Summer to the Grand Canyon.  Of course, we always had those bold wanderlust or Peace Corp types of parents who were never fearful about picking up their toddler and heading to the Andes but they were in the minority.

    A new report by Resonance Consultancy points to the increasing importance of Millennials to the family travel market.

    Travel Agents Report states that “44 percent of Millennial travelers take their vacations with the kids in tow,” according to the firm’s new Future of U.S. Millennial Travel report.

    More than half (58%) of U.S. Millennials who traveled overnight last year have children under the age of 18 in the household, Resonance learned.

    Once kids enter the picture, Millennial parents continue to travel.

    Now and in the future, millennial parents will not even hesitate to do so. Many are open to the idea of home schooling their children while living and working as digital nomads abroad. They do not think a child necessarily needs in-school instructions. As a result, we will see more children grow up as students of the world.

    The well traveled child is the future.

    2. Making home made baby food

    In the last decade alone, American spending on baby food has dropped dramatically, and there’s a growing emphasis on making baby food at home.

    Millennial parents have grown up in the age of information, and generally speaking, it shows.

    They’re not feeding their kids the super-processed, questionably-nutritious baby and kid food of yore, and they want to maintain their principles of eco-minded, earth- and animal-friendly living once they become parents.

    And according to Forbes, newer baby food brands are catering to them by partnering up with nutritionists and food engineers to offer sustainable biodynamic food sourcing and processes.

    Because Millennial parents of all economic classes want nutritious, organic, science-backed food for their babies , their babies Generation Alpha will be the best fed kids.

    3. More Baby wearing, Less investment in multiple strollers

    Not long ago, the stroller was a status symbol. Posh parents would have purchased more than two strollers by the time their child reached Kindergarten: a baby carriage or infant car system, a jogging stroller and a toddler stroller.

    Nowadays, it’s all about baby-wearing. Also, newer parents have less income and are interested in sustainable living, less waste and extravagance. They do not rely on things like strollers to make a statement.

    The term “babywearing” was coined by William Sears, a California-based pediatrician who in 1992 wrote “The Baby Book,” which popularized the concept of “attachment parenting.”

    Along with co-sleeping and extended breast-feeding, baby carrying is a core tenet of that parenting approach, which is supposed to nurture a closer attachment between parent and baby and ultimately a healthier child.

    The future of parenting is more engaged and connected parents and baby wearing is part of that.

    4. Single by Choice/More cohabitation before marriage or without plans to ever marry

    Beginning with Generation X, women have been willing to have babies on their own, or elect to just co-habitate with a partner and skip getting married altogether. However, most eventually bowed to societal pressure to find the one, exchange vows and have kids.

    Future parents are not willing to be handcuffed by societal rules and tradition.

    In 2009, the oldest millennials were in their 20s and as The Wall Street Journal reports, of those older millennials who did have kids, most were unmarried.

    And generally, what is norm has changed.

    A Pew report finds that just 46% of kids in 2016 were living in a household with two married parents in their first marriage, compared to 61% in 1980.

    Generation Z is coming up behind the Millenial generation and are said to be more financially savvy,  the next era of parents will be even less constrained by standards of traditional practices.

    Their family planning practices will reflect this prediction.

    5. More demanding about Parental Leave

    Dads in the Generation Y are also leading the charge in changing gender-based roles in the home, and likewise will change policies related to parental leave.

    Millennial dads are more likely to take paternity leave after their spouses or partners have a child.  They are also more likely to be stay at home dads and to baby wear.

    A Business Insider report states that “millennial dads are far more likely than their fathers were to take time off work after the birth of a baby” and quotes a 2016 Cornell University study  which asserts that dads who take longer paternal leave tend to be more engaged and involved with their kids in the long run.

    That same report indicated that “in 1989, only 10% of these stay-at-home parents were dads, whereas today, stay-at-home fathers account for 17% of such caregivers” and noted that while “women still account for the vast majority of parents in this role, but the numbers are on a course toward more balance.”

    Further,it states that in many dual-income millennial homes in which both parents work full time (that’s 46% of households, according to Pew), the mother is the primary earner.

    They are making private companies and the government adjust to this new dynamic.

    Millennial parents have influenced employers such as Microsoft and Netflix to announce significant expansions to their paid parental leave benefits.

    As more private companies start to offer extended family leave and generous paternity leave, future parents from up and down the socioeconomic ladder will start expecting and even demanding adequate time off after welcoming a child to the family.

    They will also be more likely to support laws or support candidates that propose new laws standardizing and expanding parental leave policies and laws.

    6. More Social Media – Less Friends/Family as Advice Source

    Parents will be more comfortable about sharing photos of their children in social media and some with actually brand their children from birth, similar to the way celebrities do now.

    About 4 in 5 millennials admit to posting a picture of their kid online at least once, according to a poll conducted by TIME and Survey Monkey. Half of baby boomers, meanwhile, have never posted a photo of their kids online, as well as 30% of Gen X parents.

    A Business Insider report about how Millennials use their children as status symbols state they are spending up to $100,000 on things like Instagram-worthy nurseries.

    Month-by-Month posts for the first  year of a baby’s life and fabulous color coordinated themed first birthday parties are a thing that Instagram following are made of!

    Being that the new generation of parents are more digital conscious and aware, they will continue to skip friends and family for advice and turn to Google.

    A recent New York Times article states that millennial parents go to Google, chat rooms, and apps for parenting advice and as one expert told the paper, “Google is the new grandparent, the new neighbor, the new nanny.”

    7. Creative Names and Less Formal Names with History and Meaning

    “Finding a name that has authentic roots, but is completely undiscovered, is the ultimate baby name status symbol,” Pamela Redmond Satran, a founder of the site Nameberry and author of “The Nameberry Guide to Off-the-Grid Baby Names,” told Alex Williams of The New York Times.

    The future of parenting will include names that are not necessarily connected to a family or tradition.

    In fact, more Millennial parents are reportedly looking for a name that is not already attached to a domain.

    Also, that New York Times article mentions that many millennial parents are giving their kids personal hashtags and YouTube channels.

    8. Raising Gender Neutral Children

    With more awareness of LGBTQ issues and variances of how members of that community identify, modern and Millennial parents are cognizant about how they label their children. In year’s past, we followed strict gender identity and roles. To put it bluntly, children were either male or female. However, in the coming years, more parents will be open with raising children without subjecting them to or assigning them gender identity.  Future parents may be more likely to let their kids determine for themselves how they want to identify.

    A Euromonitor international report states that middle class parents in developed world, especially older Millennials who are becoming parents, are taking a more gender-neutral approach to child raising, using neutral colors and with names suitable for either gender proving popular.

    9. Less Religious – More Spiritual or Non Religious

    A lot of holidays in secular society have become so homogenized and commercial that it is very easy for a child raised in a non-religious household to not feel left out. Christmas, Easter even Halloween and Day of the Dead which have cultural and spiritual origins are practiced and recognized by people who do not go to Church or follow the initial practices of each holiday.

    Four in ten millennials now say they are religiously unaffiliated, according to the Pew Research Center. In fact, millennials (those between the ages of 23 and 38) are now almost as likely to say they have no religion as they are to identify as Christian.

    10. They will do what feels right to them 

    If any of the aforementioned are clues, the next generation of parenting will go with their gut and not abide by what books, society, the media, the government or advertisers tell them.

    In fact, they will be the one dictating what these ancient institutions do!

    The next era of parents will be more empowered.

    The future is here and it’s going to be quite different!

     

    Extended Penalty Free Tax Filing Deadline Is Tomorrow: H&R Block’s Online is Free for Your Teen

    Because of COVID-19, the US government extended the tax filing deadline without penalty to tomorrow, July 15th so the procrastinators are scrambling to file their taxes in time.

    If you do not have an accountant or have not booked a time for your tax guy (or gal) to hook up your taxes in time, you can still get an extension albeit with the penalty. Alternatively, if you have time and a simple return, you can use any number of online or package filing tax software.

    In past, we have used with ease H&R Block’s online service for our teen. The company is part of the IRS Free File Alliance and offers free state and federal filing for taxpayers between the ages of 17 and 51 with an adjusted gross income (AGI) of $69,000 or less and active members of the military.

    This is great for your teen or college kid who works all year and earns enough money to not be tax exempt!

    Here is an excerpt of Nerd Wallet’s assessment and a video on how to use it from The College Investor below:

    H&R Block’s prices

    One of H&R Block’s biggest pluses is its free version, which is better than most. Like the free tax software from most of its competitors, H&R Block Free lets you file the Form 1040, take the child tax credit, the earned income tax credit and the credit for the elderly or disabled.

    But it also lets you file schedules 1, 2 and 3, which is a big bonus because many taxpayers need to file those forms. Schedules 1-3 are forms you would need in the process of reporting things such as business income, alimony, deductible student loan interest, certain retirement contributions, the alternative minimum tax, the credit for dependent care expenses, the Lifetime Learning Credit or the Saver’s Credit.

    If you plan to itemize deductions, were a landlord, freelanced or ran a small business or had any other situations going on, you’ll probably need to upgrade to one of H&R Block’s paid packages. These are solid choices as well — maybe not be as flashy as TurboTax, but they’ll get you from Point A to Point B on your tax return without any trouble. And while it isn’t discount software, it’s not the most expensive option either. That makes it a solid choice for value-seekers who still want sturdy support options and modern features.

    H&R Block’s ease of use

    What it looks like

    H&R Block’s interface is good-looking, straightforward and easy to use, and it steps up to explain concepts as you go. You can skip around if you want to, and a banner across the top keeps track of where you stand in the process. A Price Preview button up top also tells you the tax-prep package you’re buying and how much it costs.

    Handy features

    There is a W-2 photo import, which lets you avoid time spent keying in numbers from little boxes. You can import 1099s, and the Premium and Self-Employed packages also import data from some popular expense-tracking apps.

    Help is available within the preparation process — terminology in the question-and-answer process is hyperlinked with a “learn more” tag so you can get more information without having to wander around. The help menu updates according to where you are, and you can click to access the Online Assist portal.

    H&R Block will import last year’s return from other tax prep companies. The free version doesn’t automatically import last year’s H&R Block return, though.

    Where you can use it

    Because the software is online, you can log in from other devices if you choose to work on your return here and there. There is also a mobile app available.

    Go check out H&R Block Online Before Tax Day 2020

    13 Free Reources to Beat Summer Brain Drain and Keep Your Child Ahead of the Class

    It might be tempting to lie around, post videos to TikTok or watch Netflix all day. Instead high schoolers should use this time to learn a new skill, take an interesting course or prepare for standardized tests like the SAT or ACT. Here are 13 free resources for high school students to get ahead while school is out.

    1. Khan Academy

    Khan Academy offers daily schedules for students ages 4-18. The free website also has courses in math, physics, U.S. history, grammar, economics and biology. High school sophomores and juniors can also find free SAT practice questions and tests. Even though the upcoming SAT administrations have been canceled or postponed, students still might want to prepare for this important exam.

    2. edX

    Even though your classes and extracurricular activities have been canceled, it doesn’t mean you should stop learning. EdX is an online platform that offers more than 2,500 courses online for free. Taking an online course is a great way to boost your resume and prove to colleges you can handle challenging material. Take this time to learn a new skill or explore a possible major from institutions like MIT, Harvard, University of California-Berkeley and more.

    3. Coursera

    Coursera is another e-learning platform that allows you to be taught by professors from Ivy League schools and other elite schools like the University of Pennsylvania, Stanford and Duke. All the courses are available for free, and topics available include C++, marketing, engineering and psychology. By taking these advanced courses, you can explore a possible major choice when you go to college.

    4. Quill

    Quill is offering its services for free to anyone affected by school closures. The interactive writing site is perfect for anyone who wants to brush up on their craft before writing their college admissions essays. On Quill, you can gain editing skills by proofreading passages, practicing grammar skills through short activities and advancing your writing.

    5. Duolingo

    The cognitive benefits of learning another language are undeniable. Studies have shown that being bilingual can benefit memoryproblem-solving abilities and even intelligenceDuolingo is a free app that high school students should take advantage of now. Some schools offer limited foreign language options, but through Duolingo, students can learn Spanish, French, Italian, Japanese, Arabic, Hindi, Russian and many more. If you want, you can even learn fictional languages like Klingon and High Valyrian.

    6. Codecademy

    While you might not be thinking about the job market just yet, coding is one of the most valuable skills that you can pick up. Codecademy is offering Pro scholarships to students affected by school closures. On the free site, you can choose what to learn, including building websites to analyze data. You’ll learn by doing and can start writing code within a few minutes of joining the site.

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    6 Ways to Stay Healthy During Summer Travel In the COVID Era

    By Durisan

    Summer is here, which normally means it’s time to take a vacation! In the age of the Coronavirus Pandemic, many plans are being changed or curtailed. No matter where you’re going, if you’re not prepared, a potentially amazing holiday can turn out to be the worst.

    Here are our summer health tips to make sure everything goes smoothly and as safely as possible.

    1 Wash your hands regularly

    It might seem obvious, but this is your best and easiest way to stay healthy while you’re traveling. Regular handwashing can help prevent COVID-19 transmission as well as more routine illnesses like diarrhea and respiratory infections. Washing up can also help you avoid bacteria such as E. coli and salmonella, which can cause major gastrointestinal issues (or even something worse). You’ll also remove germs left from a sneeze or other factors that can cause colds and other illnesses that can ruin your trip.

    And consider the health and habits of the people around you. Take antibacterial wipes to deal with germy surfaces, such as a gas pump, door handles, or hotel room surfaces.

    2 Eat and drink in moderation

    There’s no shame in indulging when you’re on vacation, but try to keep a balance between occasional splurges and nutritious food. For example, if you’re planning a big dinner, try eating light vegetables during the day.

    Also, try to eat vegetables at least once daily while traveling. Dark, leafy greens are especially a good choice: They can improve your mood and energy.

    To further protect your health, try to eat outdoors whenever possible and avoid smaller, older restaurants. Getting to-go orders is a smart alternative as well and provide the opportunity for a fun family picnic.

    3 Stay hydrated

    It can be challenging to drink enough water when you’re busy enjoying the summer and sightseeing. However, dehydration can cause headaches, fatigue and even serious health problems.

    Here are some useful tips:

    • Bring an empty bottle to the airport and fill it at the terminal.
    • Keep a bottle of water with you everywhere you go — and make sure you bring extra water for any children traveling with you.
    • Download an app to track your water intake and get notifications.

    4 Get enough sleep

    Vacation is a time for both play and rest. If you get less than six hours of sleep per night, even for just a week, you’re more likely to get a common cold than people who sleep more. If your body is thrown off from jet-lag, try taking a melatonin pill on the first night or two in your new environment. This will prepare your body to relax at your new bedtime.

    5 Get some exercise

    Even if you need a relaxing vacation where rest is the only thing you’ve planned, try to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day. Exercising on vacation can help you recover from any stiffness from sleeping in a new bed, and it improves your overall energy level. Consider exercising outdoors and avoiding enclosed gyms and studios. 

    6 Use your sunscreen

    Days spent at the pool or the beach mean more exposure to the sun’s harmful rays. Use a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30 and apply it every couple of hours or when you’re sweaty and/or wet. This will reduce your risk for skin cancer. Hats are great extra protection for you and your kids.

    10 Black Kids YouTube Channels with 100K+ Subscribers

    In this season of elevating the unsung and underrepresented voices, a lot of people are looking to diversify and expand their media, reading and tv consumption.

    Part of fostering an inclusive world is being exposed to different people from different walks of life, and in the case of a black child, to see kids who look like themselves being creative.

    For those who have children and want to include black creators, in particular, YouTube videos starring black children and their families, I’ve curated a list with links to 10 channels with over 100,000 subscribers eacH that are thriving and publishing fresh new content weekly.

    Check them out in order of the number of subscribers  and share.

    Also, there are several other rising YouTubers who do not have a large following that I will update this post to include as I become aware of them.

    1. Super Siah – 3.21M subscribers

    2. FAMOUS TUBE FAMILY 3.1M subscribers

    3. ONYX FAMIY – 2.9M subscribers

    4. THE MCLURE FAMILY – 1.6M subscribers

    5. Sekora and Sefari Play – 759,000 subscribers

    6. Skits for Skittles – 664K Subscribers

    7. Goo Goo Girlz – 627,000 subscribers

    8. Naiah Games – 542,000

    9. The Carter Link – 487,000

    10. Cali’s Playhouse- 357,000 subscribers

    BONUS

    11. Whizzaroo- 326,000 subscribers

    HONORABLE MENTIONS

    12. Nadia v. Nigel – 60,000 subscribers

    13. Ace Plays and Giveaways – 12,600 Subscribers

    14. ElliTV isn’t updated any longer but it has 671,00-subscribers

    How to Clean Your Newborn

    Bellyitch Rewind

    Everybody knows that babies get dirty, however, only parents know the true extent of just how dirty that can get. New parents are in for a wild ride of drool, tears and the occasional diaper explosion.

    It can get messy and stressful, but those tender moments when your baby looks up at you and smiles make it all worth it. Baby’s bath time is important, yet for the first few months, you aren’t going to need to bathe them every day (until they start getting dirty, it’s recommended that you bathe them only two or three times a week).

    However, hygiene is still an important part of their daily routine that you are going to want to instill in them. So, how do you keep your newborn clean between baths?

    Regular Diaper Changes

    Newborns under a month old should have their diapers changed right around ten times a day – definitely not less than six. They will typically have around three or four bowel movements a day. As they get older this number will change, below is a table detailing estimates of how many times a day you should change your baby and how many diapers a month that equates to:

    Age Diaper Changes Per Day # Diapers Per Month

    0-1 Month 10-12 320

    1-5 Months 8-10 240

    5-9 Months 8 240

    9-12 Months 8 240

    Remember, the above numbers are just an estimate – some babies will require more, some will require less. Diapers also need to be changed as soon as it is noticed that they are soiled. Urine and bacteria can lead to painful rashes that take time to treat.

    Trim Their Nails

    One of the most dreaded parts of taking care of your newborn is when it comes time to trim their little nails. Just like the rest of them, their nails have been growing since before they were born – so they may need a trim during the first week (and every two or three days of the first three weeks, until the nails harden and stop growing so quickly).

    While one of your older relatives might suggest nibbling on them, you may peel them too far back which is, obviously, immensely painful. When clipping, hold your baby’s finger tight and press the the fingertip pad down and away from the nail – and of course, always using special baby clippers or scissors. Snip while following the gentle curve of their fingernail.

    Wipe Them Down

    No matter whether you’re at home or at the grocery store, you should always be sure to keep some baby wipes handy. You never know when they’re going to spit-up or have some other kind of fluid disaster – so be prepared for everything! It’s also a good idea to keep clean swaddling cloths on you at all times, too. Just like the top sheet on your bed keeps your blankets from becoming dirty, these handy baby sheets can be quickly swapped out for a clean one upon soiling.

    When it comes down to it, you want to keep your baby as clean as possible to give them the best possible hygiene for a healthy and happy life!

    7 Things First-Time Dads-To-Be Must Know Before Baby Arrives

    Photo by Josh Willink from Pexels

    We are one week away from Father’s Day and if you’re a brand new first time dad, we’ve got some Bellyitch Rewind tips to help you feel better about the inevitable mistakes you will make, the uncertainty and unsurety that will be part of your firSt foray into fatherhood:

    1. You’ll sometimes think you made a huge mistake — It’s normal every now and then to secretly wonder why you ever had a kid in the first place. Forgive yourself these occasional moments of self-doubt and, from time to time, let yourself mourn your pre-parenthood life. These moments will be short-lived.
    2. Buy a rechargeable, cordless hand vacuum — Much of your time will be spent getting things off the floor. At first, it will be all manner of bodily fluids, but soon enough, you’re going to be dealing with everything from Cheerios to banana slices. Later, the list will grow to include things like glitter, dirt, forgotten bacon and pretty much anything that can be shredded by small hands. And the clunky upright is too annoying to drag out four times a day.
    3. It’s perfectly acceptable to make an entire dinner in the microwave. That’s it.
    4. Act like a grown-up — One of the most heartbreaking sights is that of a parent and their young child in a shouting match trying to see who can out-tantrum the other. Children are an endless source of joy, but only when they’re not being an endless source of frustration. Breathe deeply and never let yourself escalate to the level of irrational fury that your little one occasionally inhabits. A two-year-old has the right to act like a child; you do not.
    5. Hand-me-downs are more than okay — Not only are secondhand baby things easier on the wallet and the environment, it’s a lot less agonizing when you find yourself on the fourth outfit of a craptastic kind of day (which, trust me, you will).
    6. Make time for the other relationships in your life — Not only is it important for your child to know there’s more to the world than you catering to their every need, but you’re also teaching them a very important lesson about what it means to have a full, loving life. Seeing you in the role of good friend or devoted spouse is a way for your kids to learn what it means to actually be a good friend or devoted spouse.
    7. You’re not the “backup parent.” You’re a father — You’re a full, equal partner in turning a small, fragile sack of fluid and bones into a loving, decent, healthy citizen of the Universe. Never let the fact that other people aren’t sure what to do with a man between conception and Little League fool you into thinking that you’re anything less than critical to every step of the process. Be informed, aggressively involved and as in love as you’re capable of letting yourself be.

    You got this, pops! GO BRAVE!!