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A Secular Family’s Guide to Halloween and Religious Holidays

by Maria Polonchek

I don’t remember how my husband Chris and I ended up with six-month-old twins dressed as vegetables—a chili pepper and a pea pod, to be precise—the first Halloween we were parents. I’ll admit the whole thing sounds very much like the result of a middle-of-the-night-nursing and Internet-browsing session. Regardless, they were pretty cute, as far as produce goes, and we wanted to show them off. At the last minute, we decided to throw on overalls (an article of clothing every good Kansan should own), dress as farmers, and take the veggies downtown, where we’d heard there was annual storefront trick-or-treating.

We did not head out the door that night intending for Halloween to become our family thing. In our Midwestern college town, we discovered, students ranging in age from preschool to graduate school flock downtown to the local businesses, who open their doors after hours and hand out candy from cauldrons and wheelbarrows. Everyone dresses up and the restaurants overflow with happy witches and silly superheroes, nibbling candy, drinking beer, eating French fries. Neither of us had participated in the festivities before becoming parents but realized, at least in this town, you’re never too old to be something for Halloween.

For the next five years, the downtown trick-or-treat tour was tradition, and our family’s passion for Halloween blossomed. While the twins were young, we dressed in themes: the farmers and veggies, Dr. Seuss characters, a family of pirates. Within a few years, though, the boys were ready to fulfill their own costume visions and left Chris and I on our own to coordinate. Halloween became our immediate family’s most consistent annual tradition, the holiday we made our own. The summer we moved to California, I had a harder time thinking of being away for Halloween more than any other day.

Chris and I are raising our children outside of religion, which is not unlike relocating to a new place: it’s both liberating and daunting to be free from constraints that inform our rituals and traditions. On the one hand, the possibilities are endless. We can determine for ourselves what values we want to express, what connections we want to nurture, and when, where, and how we do it. On the other hand, precisely because the possibilities are endless and we can make adjustments, we may notice “tradition” lacking in qualities that help define it: predictability, commitment, endurance.

It’s worth taking on the challenge: a whole body of research points to the fact that rituals and traditions benefit children in a number of ways, including academically, emotionally, and socially.  As I’ve seen first hand, being able to count on a predictable set of behaviors and activities around certain landmark dates brings children a sense of stability and security. Opportunities to contribute to these activities helps kids feel useful and needed, shaping identity and a sense of purpose. Participating alongside family and community members, regardless of differences in age and lifestyle, combats sentiments of self-centeredness and encourages empathy and generosity — all while creating lasting memories of positive emotions. It seems important, then, for all families, religious or not, to find meaningful traditions of their own.

We’d begun our Halloween tradition haphazardly, out of convenience more than anything else, as the logistics—who, what, when, where, how—were already answered for us. We didn’t really need to think about it; we just showed up to a party that had already been planned. Over time we developed an approach that stuck, one we could emulate even after we moved away from our familiar environment near family.

Thus I realized: holidays like Halloween, with little or no religious baggage, are the perfect occasions for creating solid family traditions outside of religion.

Thanksgiving is another great example. It can be tricky to come up with a formula for creating tradition outside of the mainstream. I’ve learned, though, that creating new traditions can be a celebration of creativity and imagination.

Below are my suggestions for how to navigate the ins and outs of creating meaningful traditions for your family, with or without religion:

  • Pick your occasions. Take a look at some of the activities and holidays your family has already established as routine. Ask your children what parts they enjoy and why. Consider what the activity expresses about the group and how each person can participate. Whether it’s Valentine’s Day, the summer equinox, or even Superbowl Sunday, make your picks and stick with them. Ritual and tradition is not so much what you do; it’s how you do it, together: with regularity, intention, and commitment.
  • Own it. Reflect on your values and the things that give your family life meaning so that you are fully behind the actions. Consider the historical and/or philosophical reasons and meanings behind established traditions and create versions of your own to honor those that resonate. If you notice something lacking—an activity that expresses generosity or service, for example—come up with an activity that reflects this value and fold it in.
  • Make room for others. Traditions are connectors; they link us to one another, which requires patience, understanding, and compromise. Remember, just as we don’t always resonate with traditions from past generations, so our children won’t always resonate with ours. Participating in tradition can be a practice in selflessness and acceptance.
  • Allow for flexibility. While a defining component of tradition is its predictability, we also must allow for (and even embrace) change and differences. The level of flexibility needed won’t be the same for every family. Perhaps the location is always different, but the activity is the same. Or the location is the same, but some of the people participating rotate. Families who struggle with differences in worldview or belief can still come together to celebrate shared values in creative ways that work for everyone.
  • Be committed. Because tradition can serve as a touchstone in times of change and difficulty, it’s important to keep it going even when the going gets rough. It can sometimes feel like pressure or burden on the leaders of the group, but if you’re struggling, take a moment to reflect on the benefits, talk to your kids about what they find meaningful, and make adjustments that work for the entire family.

About the Author

Maria Polonchek is author of In Good Faith: Secular Parenting in a Religious World (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, August 2017). Part memoir, part cultural exploration, In Good Faith examines how to raise children with a sense of identity, belonging and meaning outside of religion. Maria holds a BA in English and an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from the University of Kansas. Her parenting essays can be found in outlets such as Brain, Child, Have Milk, Will Travel, The Greater Good Science Center, The Friendly Atheist and Brian, Mother. A Kansas native, she lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her husband and three children. In addition to thinking, reading and writing about parenting, she is passionate about wellness, mindfulness, the outdoors, music, art – and the way all of these things relate to social justice.

Memorial Day Photo Of Kids Visiting Dad’s Grave Goes Viral Again

Today, we honor the memory of those who died in war fighting for freedoms and other reasons.

A two-year old photo of two boys visiting their deceased soldier dad’s gravesite is making the viral rounds once again.

I’m sharing the background of their story for those who are interested in knowing the very bittersweet and tender backstory from 2017:

Brothers Mylan and Mason Brazel visited the grave of their father, Staff Sgt. Alfred Brazel, in a touching scene at Arlington National Cemetery for the first time since his death from cancer at 37 in July

As brothers Mason and Mylan Brazel visited their father’s tombstone at Arlington National Cemetery for the first time, the young boys felt like they were just having a normal conversation with dad.

Kait Brazel, 29, captured the touching scene as sons Mason, 8, and Mylan, 5, curled up in front of the tombstone of Army Staff Sgt. Alfred “Fred” Brazel, who died at 37 of Stage 4 rectal cancer on July 31 after being diagnosed only five months earlier.

“I felt proud while we were there,” Brazel told TODAY in an email. “Obviously it was sad because the boys are talking to their dad and he can’t talk back, but really I’m proud because throughout the fight our goal was to be realistic with the boys without the losing their innocence as children.

“Seeing them share their lives with their dad’s headstone, I knew we accomplished exactly that.”

The boys went to every doctor’s appointment with their dad during his fight with cancer, and their parents answered every hard question they asked about his diagnosis, Kait Brazel said.

“We never once addressed it as a sad thing,” Brazel said. “That was the attitude and mentality we had throughout the battle. We as a family lived and continue to live life to the fullest in every moment.

“We don’t shelter them from ‘adult things.’ It was their dad and they were a part of the fight. We have always been very open with them, and because of this I believe they have handled the whole journey amazingly.”

The family drove 24 hours from their home in Colorado Springs, CO, to Arlington National Cemetery on Nov. 20 for the touching visit.

It was an emotional journey that came three months after Fred Brazel’s funeral, a heart-wrenching day that was captured by professional photographer and family friend Alishia Potter in August.

At one point during the visit at Arlington, Mylan curled up and took a nap in front of the tombstone, while Mason updated his dad about winning a trophy in swimming.

Kait is also hoping the pictures bring attention to the dangers to soldiers from burn pits. She believes Fred got cancer from exposure to toxic chemicals during a deployment in Iraq.

After their trip to Arlington, the Brazels spent Thanksgiving with family in Boston and then went to Niagara Falls, a place Fred always wanted to visit with the boys.

They are grateful for being able to share some time with Fred ahead of their first holiday season without him. Shortly before they left, Mylan gave the tombstone a hug.

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RHOA’s Porsha Williams Covers ‘Rolling Out’; Gives Mompreneur Advice

Real Housewives of Atlanta star Porsha Williams covers last month’s edition of Rolling Out Magazine.

On the cover and in inside pics, the gorgeous and buxom mom-to-be poses on the patio near a scenic locale and is shrouded in a beautiful yellow lace embroidered and sequined designed off-the-shoulder bump-hugging yellow gown with flowy bohemian sleeves and fringe skirt

The reality TV star dishes about her connection to Atlanta, her Civil Rights roots as the granddaughter to noted icon Hosea Williams, who marched alongside luminaries like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King, and Andrew Young; and gives advice to other mom entrepreneurs.

“I knew Atlanta was special from a very young age, just through charity work,” Williams told the magazine. “My grandfather, Hosea Williams, created the charity Hosea Feed the Hungry and Homeless. I worked in it, and it was right in the heart of Atlanta. All of my life I’ve been very close to the community and have known the people. We like to work together, we like to build each other up, we like to network; it’s a very [forward-looking city].”

Williams, who is a host on the nightly syndicated gossip radio talk show Dish Nation and has several ecommerce brands gave advice to other moms who are in business for themselves.

“Mommy entrepreneurs must be sure to have a great support system,” she offers. “You have to make sure that the type of business that you want to start will be good for you and your family. I wouldn’t get into just anything. If you don’t have someone to keep your kids and the best support, you may want to start a business that’s online, where you could be working from home. Start a business that’ll be practical for your real lifestyle. Research it and just go for it. Dream big and put in the hard work. Always use your kids as the focus and the purpose and the drive for what you’re going to do.”

And entrepreneurship was in her blood and family.

“My father was an entrepreneur,” the Bravolebrity shares. “He owns his own chemical company. My mother is also an entrepreneur, owning numerous childcare centers throughout Atlanta. I started out working in the family business, which was childcare. I ended up starting my own childcare center [at] 24 years old. Being an entrepreneur gives me the power to come up with a product that is close to my heart, and [a chance to] offer something to inspire other women and help them express themselves.

“I wouldn’t get into just anything. If you don’t have someone to keep your kids and the best support, you may want to start a business that’s online, where you could be working from home. Start a business that’ll be practical for your real lifestyle. Research it and just go for it. Dream big and put in the hard work. Always use your kids as the focus and the purpose and the drive for what you’re going to do.”

Photo: Stanley Babb for Rolling Out

20 Hacks and Tips to Avoid Holiday Weight Gain

Every year, the average American gains between 7 to 12 pounds between Thanksgiving and Christmas, 

Thanks to Dr. Eddie Fatakhov, M.D., a.k.a. Dr. Fat-off, a Board-Certified Physician, Nutritionist, and Best-Selling Author of “The Doctors’ Clinic-30 Program“, we have 21 hacks, tips and suggestions for you to follow to avoid excess Holiday Weight Gain

His latest book is “Dr. Fat-Off Simple Life-Long Weight-Loss Solutions.”

1. Bring your own sugar-free drinks to a party in case your host has none to offer.

2. Eat something, even if it’s an apple before arriving to a party, it will help take the edge off your hunger.

3. If the function, gathering or restaurant has a buffet, be careful and make sure you get at the end of the line behind everybody else. Take only 2-3 small items and return to your seat. Eat your selections slowly, with ample fluid intake between bites.

4. Repeat step 4 after waiting a short interval and return to the buffet for one or two more items.

5. Repeat step 5 but take ONE selection per trip. Each selection or item should be about the size of the average cafeteria selection of that food.

6. When visiting friends or family, be careful not to accept sweets or problem foods. Instead graciously decline, but do accept something, even if it is a sugar-free soda, unsweetened tea, decaf coffee, or water.

7. Never say you are on a diet, as this is an open invitation for your hostess to tempt you, or argue with you about whether or not something is permitted.

8. Consider eating lean turkey, ham, beef or similar moderate-fat proteins for your main dish at holiday parties.

9. Eat Slowly! Average person should chew 30 times before swallowing.

10. Don’t forget to add lightly-steamed vegetables to meat dishes as they are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber.

11. When first seated at the table, the first thing you should spot is the WATER! Drink (8-10) ounces (or more) with each meal.

12. Always select fresh fruit and vegetables over spiced meats, hams, cheeses, crackers, and dips.

13. Try your best to avoid sugary pies, cakes, and cookies.

14. When eating, select smaller portions and use smaller plates.

15. Always leave food behind. Never clean your plate.

16. Deserts should be limited to sugar-free gelatins, alone or in combination with unsweetened chopped cranberries, or grated carrots.

17. If you use artificial sweeteners like Equal, add it after cooking since over heating it destroys its sweetness.

18. Saccharin and Splenda can be used in recipes that involve cooking, because they are stable molecules, even at baking temperatures.

19 Ambrosia can be made with no sugar, producing a guilt free holiday treat.

20. Fruitcakes, mincemeat pie and other rich calorie loaded confections should be avoided as if they were poison. 

Cyber Week Sales for Girly Girls Who Love to Shop {2018 Gift Guide}

For that Girly Girl who loves to shop, we’ve got your number: Tons of Sales with discounts all Black Friday-Cyber Week long! Whether you’re on the hunt for a perfect gift or gift card, or you’re looking for a gift for yourself, here are the deals to check out this weekend.

Ann Taylor

50% off everything with code BLACKFRIDAY. Valid 11/22-11/25.

50% off everything with code CYBER2018. Valid 11/25- 11/28.

Ann Taylor LOFT

50% your purchase with code FRIYAY. Valid through 11/24.

Bloomingdales 

Take 25% off site wide + 10% off cosmetics during the Cyber Sale. Valid 11/25-11/27.



Far Fetch 

 Take 20% off sale items with code x20BF. Valid 11/22-11/26.

Kohl’s  Take an extra 20% off site wide with code TAKE20. Valid 11/24-11/28.

Neiman Marcus Last Call 

Black Friday! Shop 40-80% off everything. Valid 11/22-11/26.

Designer Sale! 40% off fall apparel, sport shop and dress collections. Valid 11/19-12/2.

L.L. Bean

20% Off Apparel and Outerwear . Valid 11/21 – 11/27

Lord & Taylor 

Black Friday Sale with code FRIDAY. Valid 11/20-11/25.

Net-a-Porter 

Select styles up to 50% off. Valid beginning 11/19. End date TBA.

Neiman Marcus 

Receive $50 off your $200+ regular priced purchase with code THANKFUL. Valid 11/21-11/24.

Nordstrom 

Receive up to 60% off. Valid 11/22-11/26.

Nordstrom Rack

Black Friday Clearance! Receive an extra 30% off. Valid 11/21-11/26.

Urban Outfitters 

BOGO site wide. Valid 11/21-11/23.

Saks

The Thanksgiving Sale! Up to 60% OFF* vast selections. Valid 11/21-11/23.

Saks Off Fifth



Clearance now up to 90% off with code AMAZING.

Sole Society

– Black Friday Weekend: 30% Off All Shoes & Bags. Valid 11/23-11/25.

Coming Soon: Bellyitch 2018 Holiday Gift Guides

Hey guys! The holiday season is fast approaching and Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday are also right around the corner. To help my readers navigate the noise and overwhelm, I’m releasing a series of Gift Guides with unique and distinctive items you can get any type of person on your list.

They will launch on Monday so stay tuned! If you are a brand and would like to be on my sponsored Gift Guide that will be released AFTER Thanksgiving, give me a holler at jj(at)bellyitchblog.com with the SUBJECT “HOLIDAY SPONSORED GIFTGUIDE” Thanks!

Here are the gift guides coming:

  1. Non Toys
  2. Foodies
  3. Outdoorsy Type
  4. Homebody
  5. Traveler
  6. Trendsetter
  7. Lover of Color Black
  8. Coffee Lover
  9. Wine Lover
  10. Animal/Pet
  11. New Mom
  12. Blogger/Boss Babe
  13. Design Enthusiast
  14. Vintage Toys
  15. Hostess Succulent
  16. Tech
  17. Under $30
  18. Home
  19. Book lover
  20. Girly Girl
  21. Workout Buddy
  22. Unplugged Activities
  23. Wine Lover
  24. Stocking Stuffers
  25. Personalized

Celebrity 2018 Family Halloween Costumes That Rocked

Ok. Halloween was Wednesday but I say until the end of Daylight’s Savings Time, it’s open season for bloggers to share Halloween costumes and their fave costume posts before we launch into Thanksgiving, Black Friday and Holiday season posts.

So…Here is my list of fave celebrity Halloween costume photos featuring their families and children that they shared in social media.

First, our Bellyitch Bumpwatch alums, the celeb women whose pregnancies we’ve featured on this blog:

Justin Timberlake, Jessica Biel and their son Silas went as the Lego version of Batman, Robyn and Harley Quinn!

Neil Patrick Harris and his fam usually do the best each year and this year was no different when they dressed as ghosts from the past.

Ciara and her fam dressed as characters from the Black Panther movie.

Khloe Kardashian and her daughter Tru dressed as Unicorns.

They also dressed as tigers.

Kylie Jenner and her daughter Stormi dressed as butterflies

They also dressed as “Stormi Weather”

Saint and North West and Penelope and Reign Dissick as Kanye West and Lil Pump  

Pink and son, Jameson were the cutest pirates during the week.

And later with the whole family as The Greats Showman on Earth!

Reese Witherspoon and her husband Jim Toth and youngest son dresses as ghoulish characters and her older son dresses as a rapper?

Alyssa Milano and her children dressed as Pokemon characters.

Hilaria Baldwin and her husband Alec Baldwin and their kids, Carmen, Rafael and Leonardo Baldwin are astronauts.

Our Pick of the Best Black Friday Deals Around

BELLYITCH REWIND

In case you missed it, we’re reposting….

Personal finance website Wallet Hub released its survey of the stores with the Best Black Friday Deals in terms of the amount of savings offered to customers. JC Penney and Kohl’s tied for first with 66.3% discounts on goods sold that day after Thanksgiving.

We reviewed the other top stores on their list and identified the items on the Bellyitch Staff’s List that constitute the BEST Black Fridaybdoorbuster Deals around!

Element 40 inch TV- Target for $179

Free Samsung Galaxy Note8, Galaxy S8 or Galaxy 8+ – FREE

Samsung Galaxy J3 Luna Pro no-contract phone – $39

Amazon Fire 7 tablet 7″ 8GB  $39

Sony PlayStation 4 1TB console – $199 ($100 off!)

HexBug R/C Robot BattleBots Arena – $49 (Save $30)

Jetson Beam electric scooter – $199 (Save $100)

Skyline 5-pc. luggage set – $49 (Save $50)

Graco Pack ’n Play Simple Solutions playard – $49.99 (save $30)

Dyson V6 Animal – $249 (save $250)

Crock-Pot 4.5-qt. manual slow cooker – $10

George Foreman 2-serving classic grill – $10

Bodum French press coffee for two – $10

Hamilton Beach 6-speed 275-watt hand mixer with case – $10

Ninja Coffee Bar coffee maker with thermal carafe – $199 (save $100)

T-fal 20-pc. nonstick cookware set – $49 (save $50)

Rubbermaid 34-pc. food storage container set – $7

Threshold™ chenille or Sherpa throw – $10

Queen-size bedding sets – $35 (save$44)

 

20% off one shopping trip between Nov. 28 – Dec. 10*

Kohl

Keurig® K-Select™ Single-Serve K-Cup Pod® Coffee Maker –$99 (save $50)

The Sharper Image 14.4-in. Lunar Drone with HD Camera & Virtual Reality Smartphone Viewer $79 – (Save $89)

X-Rocker Bluetooth 2.1 Gaming Chair – $99 (save $100)

Free Shipping when you shop online for orders over $50

Sears

Reebok Women’s Dash Athletic Shoe – $29 (save $30)

NordicTrack 10.9 Elliptical with Free Delivery – $599 (save $1000)

Sterling Silver 1/10 ct. tw. Diamond Studs fwith any Online Purchase of $19.99 or more – $19

Gold Over Silver 1/10 cttw Diamond Heart Pendant – $17.99 (save $82)

JC Penny

JCPenney Home™ 6-pc. Bath Towel Set – $19 (save $40)

Disney Princess 9-pc. Doll Set – $49.99 (save $50)

Carter’s 2-pc. Stripe Pant Set Baby Unisex – $7.99 (save $12)

Free Shipping on any order over $49.

12 Last Minute Turkey Prep Tips

If you are like me and are preparing the Thanksgiving bird this year, you may be on the hunt for Thanksgiving Turkey cooking tips! I found some and curated the best from around the web including from Food Network, IB Business, Martha Stewart and Fine Cooking and I’m sharing them here with you! Good luck!

When calculating your roasting time, plan on about 15 minutes per pound.

1. By now you should have completely thawed  your bird, but if you were last minute and didn’t you can cook a frozen turkey by following the tips at Epicurious here.

2. A turkey will cook more evenly if it is not densely stuffed. Consider adding flavor by loosely filling the cavity with aromatic vegetables — carrots, celery, onion or garlic work nicely — or by carefully tucking fresh herbs underneath the breast skin. For the stuffing lovers, cook the dressing in a casserole dish on the side.

3. Before roasting, coat the outside of the turkey with vegetable or olive oil, season with salt and pepper and tightly cover the breast with aluminum foil to prevent over-browning (it will be removed in step 7).

4. If stuffing the turkey, do so just before roasting to prevent unwanted bacterial growth. Because the stuffing will expand as it bakes, fill the turkey’s cavity loosely; this also allows the stuffing to cook more evenly and keeps it from becoming too dense. A 12- to 15-pound turkey needs about 10 cups of stuffing; a 15- to 20-pound bird can hold up to 12 cups.

5. To keep it moist, pour about a half cup of water into the bottom of the roasting pan and place the turkey breast side up into the pan.

6. Once your oven pre-heats to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (the minimum temperature is 325 degrees Fahrenheit), you can put it into the oven. Halfway through cooking, take your turkey out of the oven and cover the most exposed areas, such as the legs, in tin foil to keep them from drying out.

7.  Once you get the turkey in the oven, resist the temptation to open the oven door and admire your handiwork. When the oven temperature fluctuates, you’re only increasing the likelihood of a dry bird.

8. If the bird is browning quickly but not near its target doneness temperature of 170°F, tent it loosely with foil and continue roasting. If the drippings seem to be getting too dark, add a couple tablespoons of water to keep them from burning.

9. About 45 minutes before you think the turkey is done, remove the foil from the breast to allow it to brown.

10. Remove the turkey from the oven and use an instant-read thermometer to determine temperature; it should read 165 degrees F at the thigh when it’s done. If you stuff your turkey, check the internal temperature of the stuffing as well; it should be at least 165 degrees.

11. Tent the bird with foil and let rest for about 25 minutes before carving. If you need more time to make gravy, heat up side dishes, etc., you can let the turkey set for up to an hour without losing too much heat.

12. The intense heat of the oven forces the juices into the center of the bird, so after roasting, let the turkey rest for roughly 20 minutes. The juices will redistribute, and you’ll get moister slices.

Remember to carve your turkey with a very sharp or electric knife and ENJOY!

We Found THE absolute BEST Black Friday Deals For You

Personal finance website Wallet Hub released its survey of the stores with the Best Black Friday Deals in terms of the amount of savings offered to customers. JC Penney and Kohl’s tied for first with 66.3% discounts on goods sold that day after Thanksgiving.

We reviewed the other top stores on their list and identified the items on the Bellyitch Staff’s List that constitute the BEST Black Fridaybdoorbuster Deals around!

Element 40 inch TV- Target for $179

Free Samsung Galaxy Note8, Galaxy S8 or Galaxy 8+ – FREE

Samsung Galaxy J3 Luna Pro no-contract phone – $39

Amazon Fire 7 tablet 7″ 8GB  $39

Sony PlayStation 4 1TB console – $199 ($100 off!)

HexBug R/C Robot BattleBots Arena – $49 (Save $30)

Jetson Beam electric scooter – $199 (Save $100)

Skyline 5-pc. luggage set – $49 (Save $50)

Graco Pack ’n Play Simple Solutions playard – $49.99 (save $30)

Dyson V6 Animal – $249 (save $250)

Crock-Pot 4.5-qt. manual slow cooker – $10

George Foreman 2-serving classic grill – $10

Bodum French press coffee for two – $10

Hamilton Beach 6-speed 275-watt hand mixer with case – $10

Ninja Coffee Bar coffee maker with thermal carafe – $199 (save $100)

T-fal 20-pc. nonstick cookware set – $49 (save $50)

Rubbermaid 34-pc. food storage container set – $7

Threshold™ chenille or Sherpa throw – $10

Queen-size bedding sets – $35 (save$44)

 

20% off one shopping trip between Nov. 28 – Dec. 10*

Kohl

Keurig® K-Select™ Single-Serve K-Cup Pod® Coffee Maker –$99 (save $50)

The Sharper Image 14.4-in. Lunar Drone with HD Camera & Virtual Reality Smartphone Viewer $79 – (Save $89)

X-Rocker Bluetooth 2.1 Gaming Chair – $99 (save $100)

Free Shipping when you shop online for orders over $50

Sears

Reebok Women’s Dash Athletic Shoe – $29 (save $30)

NordicTrack 10.9 Elliptical with Free Delivery – $599 (save $1000)

Sterling Silver 1/10 ct. tw. Diamond Studs fwith any Online Purchase of $19.99 or more – $19

Gold Over Silver 1/10 cttw Diamond Heart Pendant – $17.99 (save $82)

JC Penny

JCPenney Home™ 6-pc. Bath Towel Set – $19 (save $40)

Disney Princess 9-pc. Doll Set – $49.99 (save $50)

Carter’s 2-pc. Stripe Pant Set Baby Unisex – $7.99 (save $12)

Free Shipping on any order over $49.