Authors: Sorry to Rain on Your Twin Obsession Parade, But Twins Are Risky, Period

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Twins are always considered a blessing and lately, they’ve been getting even more glorification, especially with celebs like Beyonce and Amal Clooney making recent headlines for the fact they are carrying twins.

But as with any celebration, there are those who will swoop in to offer a reality check. Like one Daily Mail columnist, Jill Foster, herself a mom, who wrote about how twin pregnancies are high risk and come with a boat load of additional concerns, cautions and care that mom (and dad) must undertake.

“Multiple births are fraught with risk, no matter how rich you are,” Foster writes in a recent column. “Carrying my twin girls was the most arduous and terrifying thing I’ve done — and the professionals agree with me.”

She quotes consultant obstetrician and gynecologist Shazia Malik, a sub-specialist in reproductive medicine at London’s Portland Hospital, who said that “people underestimate the risks of a multiple pregnancy.”

There is a risk “of miscarriage, stillbirth or pre-term birth is around five times higher than a singleton pregnancy. Once premature babies are born, they may spend several weeks or even months in Special Care and may have growth restriction, brain damage, problems with vision and later have developmental delay,” Malik said.

She adds: “There’s a higher risk to the mother, too, of developing gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia, which could lead to death.”

Foster says her identical twin daughters were conceived without medical intervention but that she went thru her pregnancy in fear because her twins developed in the same sac, increasing the chances of dual death were something to go wrong.

“At 11 weeks’ pregnant, I’d learned that the babies were growing in the same amniotic sac. Called a mono-amniotic pregnancy, it meant their umbilical cords could easily become entwined and strangulated.

“Not even one baby would survive if this happened. They would live or die together, and death would be sudden or spontaneous. I lived my pregnancy on a knife edge. It seemed sensible to only tell my closest family and friends.”

She also thinks she suffered post partum depression which is common among moms of multiples.

According to the Twins and Multiple Birth Association (TAMBA), mothers of multiples have almost twice the average risk of postnatal depression and it tends to last longer and can still require treatment up to seven years after the birth.

Then there are the myths of twin pregnancies.  In a new book Twin Mythconceptions: False Beliefs, Fables, and Facts about TwinsDr. Nancy L. Segal attempts to bust over 70 myths regarding twin pregnancies.


Here are some of the top 10 Myths, (many of which we have blogged about before here on Bellyitch), Dr. Segal has identified:

the “Top 10” myths or beliefs about twins, which include:

  • Identical twins can communicate by extrasensory perception or ESP (False)

o   There is no scientific evidence that twins exchange thoughts or ideas by reading each other’s minds—identical twins’ social closeness is better explained by studies showing that their common genes underlie their within-pair communication skills.

  • Older mothers are more likely to conceive fraternal twins than younger mothers (True)

o   Since releasing two eggs at the same time is not typical, this is possibly a reflection of the aging process.

  • Identical twins have identical fingerprints (False)

o   These features, which develop between the 10th and 25th gestational week, are affected by factors such as temperature, intrauterine position and density of amniotic fluid near the fingers.

  • Your consumption of yams and other dietary choices increase the chances of conceiving fraternal twins (True)

o   It is thought that the white yam contains fertility-inducing properties that trick the female body into releasing hormones that promote ovulation–this may partly explain the high fraternal twinning rate among the Yorùbá of western Nigeria.

Dr. Segal is currently Professor of Psychology at California State University, Fullerton and Director of the Twin Studies Center. She has authored more than 200 scientific articles and book chapters, as well as four highly acclaimed books on twins.

The moral of the story is celebrate twin births. Admire them. Dote on moms carrying twins. Offer help and support to family and friends who deliver twins, especially afterwards, given the higher PPD risk. But certainly, be very aware that they are risky pregnancies and deserve extra care and consideration before venturing into IVF in hopes of carrying them if you cannot conceive a set without medical intervention. Don’t let these celebrities out here lull you into a fairy tale la la land.

So Sports Bookies Are Already Taking Bets On Serena Williams’ Fetus, Really!

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Serena Williams has barely enjoyed a day of the world knowing that she is expecting her first child with fiance Reddit co-founder Alex Ohanian and the bookies are already in her taking bets on her little bambino.

 BetOnline.ag, one of the world’s online betting sportsbook site has folks gambling on things like the first letter of the baby’s first name, its gender, weight and whether the 23-time Tennis Grand Slam champ will have twins or triplets!


There is a term for betting on something tangentially related to a sports game, “propositional bet,” concerning an “occurrence or non-occurrence” not directly affecting a game’s outcome. Since Serena is actively training for any tournament, this is very very propositional.

When Beyonce performed during one of the Super Bowls, bookies took bets on whether she’d have a wardrobe malfunction and have one of her boobs exposed. Seriously. This is not a game. ha!

If you want to get in on the fun but with your own impending arrival or one of a family or friend, you can start an online pool using a site like Baby Bookie.

 

This isn’t new for pregnant celebrities either. When Kate Middleton was expecting her first child, her unknown due date kept the booking business popping then too.

People will bet on anything if they love to gamble!

[note: Speaking of which, if you or someone you knows suffers from gambling addiction, call  The National Council on Problem Gambling operates the National Problem Gambling Helpline Network at  1-800522-4700.]

 

Trending this Spring: STRIPES!


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Listen, so stripes are BIG this Spring and ordinarily women are told to avoid stripes because horizontal ones are said to make one look wider. When there’s a baby on the way, growing a big belly is going to happen and you’d think that stripes would be a definite trend to skip this round, right?

Well, hold on there, fashionable mamas to be! There are several ways to integrate stripes in your Spring look. Naturally, accessories like scarves, jewelry, handbags and shoes are a way to do it. However, you can go with wider stripes or colored stripes in contrasting, non-complementary colors or with super thin pin-stripes. Definitely vertical stripes also can buck the widening illusion of traditional horizontal stripes.


We’ve curated a few styles to show you items you can use to achieve the look.

 

Serena Williams Announces that She is Pregnant

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Serena Williams is pregnant!

The record-breaking Tennis star announced the news on Snapchat today, showing off her baby bump while wearing a yellow bathing suit and belly chain.

She captioned the photo “20 weeks”.

The expectant arrival will be the first for Williams and her fiancé Reddit Co-Founder Alexis Ohanian.

The couple announced their engagement last December.

But what else is amazing about this news is the fact she was pregnant when she defeated her sister Venus Williams during the Australian open in January!

Wow!

Congrats!

‘Bad Girls Club’ Alum Natalie Nunn Welcomes First Child

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Congrats to reality Tv star alum Natalie Nunn of Oxygen channel’s Bad Girls Club on the birth of her first child, a baby girl.

Nunn announced the arrival of her and husband Jacob Payne‘s little one on  Twitter.


“Baby Payne is here,” Natalie captioned a photo. “I never thought I could love anyone so much,” the new mom added. “Blessed.”

Before the birth, the Hair Battle Spectacular star kept her followers and fans up to date by sharing photos from the Labor and delivery room.

“Thank you for this contraction, Lord,” Nunn captioned a black and white photo of herself going through labor. “I welcome it and know that I am one step closer to meeting my baby! I give this contraction permission to accomplish its task and I trust in my God-given instinct to birth normally and naturally, and I thank you for guiding and directing me during this process. My husband and I can’t wait to meet her! Dialated to 8 centimeters.”

Congrats!

 

Study: Antidepressant During Pregnancy Link to Autism Questioned

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Taking antidepressants during pregnancy does not increase the risk of autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, two new large studies suggest. Genetic or environmental influences, rather than prenatal exposure to the drugs, may have a greater influence on whether a child will develop these disorders. The studies are published online April 18 in JAMA.

Clinically, the message is “quite reassuring for practitioners and for mothers needing to make a decision about antidepressant use during pregnancy,” says psychiatrist Simone Vigodim, a coauthor of one of the studies. Past research has questioned the safety of expectant moms taking antidepressants


“A mother’s mood disturbances during pregnancy are a big public health issue — they impact the health of mothers and their children,” says Tim Oberlander, a developmental pediatrician at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. About one in 10 women develop a major depressive episode during pregnancy. “All treatment options should be explored. Nontreatment is never an option,” says Oberlander, who coauthored a commentary, also published in JAMA.

Untreated depression during pregnancy creates risks for the child, including poor fetal growth, preterm birth and developmental problems. Some women may benefit from psychotherapy alone. A more serious illness may require antidepressants. “Many of us have started to look at longer term child outcomes related to antidepressant exposure because mothers want to know about that in the decision-making process,” says Vigod, of Women’s College Hospital in Toronto.

Previous studies indicated that the use of antidepressants came with its own developmental risks:  autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, premature birth and poor fetal growth. “The key question is whether those risks are due to the actual medication,” says psychologist Brian D’Onofrio of Indiana University Bloomington. “Could the negative outcomes be due to the depression itself, or stress or genetic factors?” D’Onofrio and his group authored the other study.

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Tina Lawson Hosted Daughter Beyonce and Kelly Rowland for Easter

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Tina Knowles Lawson hosted her family including daughter Beyonce Knowles Carter, son-in-law Shawn “Jay Z” Carter, grands and her “play daughter” Kelly Rowland, her husband Tim Witherspoon and their son Titan.

The designer and music group manager posted a photos and videos from the Sunday event that included food, fun and Easter Egg hunt.  Lawson captioned a photo of herself with Bey and Kelly, ““3/4th of my girls❤️ Missing link at Cochella😌” referencing Solange who is performing at the Music Festival, Coachella. Queen Bey was scheduled to perform during the two weekend event but canceled due to her pregnancy.


Mrs. Carter donned an off the shoulder cream dress, Mrs. Lawson looked cute in a striped pepum top and black pants and  Kelly went with a mint creen top and white distressed denims.  Looks like a fun time!

3/4th of my girls❤️ Missing 1/4 at Cochella😌 My Solo❤️❤️Bianca

A post shared by Tina Knowles (@mstinalawson) on

She is expecting her third and fourth grand kids soon as her daughter is expecting twins.

Easter memories

A post shared by Tina Knowles (@mstinalawson) on

This is fun! Go to bed Tina 😀

A post shared by Tina Knowles (@mstinalawson) on


Rowland also posted a photo from the event, captioning a photo of her son during the hunt, “Aww, he is growing locs”.

A post shared by Kelly Rowland (@kellyrowland) on

Tax Day 2017: Ten Tax Rules for Families to Consider

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Today is Tax Day, April 18, 2017.

So as you prepare to file and head off to the tax man last minute, here are 10 tax rules and credits parents and caregivers need to know about and should consider claiming this year.


1. Exemptions for dependents
 You can claim your new baby as a dependent, which, for 2016, exempts $4,000 of your hard-earned money from taxation. For 2016, this number actually goes up to $4,050. This exemption is phased out at certain income levels. For 2015 taxes, the limit is $258,250 for single parents and $309,000 for married couples filing jointly. For 2016, the limits are $259,400 and $311,300, respectively. Similarly, you can’t claim an exemption if you’re subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax.

2. Child Tax Credit
 Depending on your income, you may be able to claim a $1,000 tax credit every year until your child reaches age 17. Better yet, you can start claiming the credit the year your child is born, even if that doesn’t happen until December. In other words, if you had a baby on Dec. 31, 2016, you can still snag that $1,000 for 2016. Sweet!

Remember, unlike with  deductions, credits lower your tax bill dollar for dollar. However, similar to  exemptions for dependents, the child tax credit phases out at higher income levels, though you cannot even claim it until you’ve earned more than $75,000 if you’re single or $110,000 if you’re married and filing jointly. The credit has the ability to reduce your tax liability to zero, but it is not refundable, meaning, it cannot count towards a refund from the IRS! Booo!!

3. Earned Income Tax Credit
Don’t worry those of you in the low to moderate income bracket, the Earned Income Tax Credit makes you eligible for up to 3,373. However, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a tax benefit for those with with only one qualifying child. And the EITC is a fully refundable credit, which means that if it’s more than large enough to reduce your tax liability to zero, then you’ll receive any remaining credit money as a refund from the IRS.

Yippeee!

4. Child and Dependent Care Credit
Childcare costs increases each year and makes up the chunk of most family budgets. The Child and Dependent Care Credit lets you claim up to 35% of the cost of qualifying child care expenses (such as a day care center or summer camp) up to a maximum of $3,000 for one child under 13, or $6,000 for two or more children under 13.  For example, if you have an infant in day care and pay $5,000 per year, you can claim up to $1,050 (35% of the $3,000 maximum) as a tax credit depending on your income.

Lower income people who earn less than $15,000 can qualify for the full 35%. That percentage falls by 1% for every additional $2,000 of income you earn until it reaches 20% for an income of $43,000 or more. You must have earned income to qualify for the credit, and if you’re married, you must file a joint tax return. Additionally, you must have paid a child care provider for the purpose of enabling you and your spouse to either work or look for work.

Unlike some other credits, this one doesn’t have an income limit, however families with Stay-At-Home moms who have a nanny caring for the kids can NOT take this credit. It is also refundable.

5. Adoption credit
If you adopted a kid last year, you can claim up $13,570 per child for qualified adoption expenses.  This credit phases out, depending on the income at $203,540 which is a higher income phase out level compared to the income level for the child tax and child care credits. Though this credit was once refundable, that’s no longer the case . However, any credit in excess of your tax liability can be carried forward for up to five years.

Of course, keeping track of all these tax breaks could prove challenging when you’re juggling the dozens of daily tasks that come with raising children. But when you sit down to do your taxes this year, it pays to see whether you’re eligible for any of them, because any amount of money can go a long way toward diapers, school supplies, and the ever-growing list of supplies you’ll need to navigate the wild and crazy journey that is parenthood.

6. 2017 EITC and ACTC Related Tax Refund Delays: The IRS has already announced that it will have to hold/delay refund payments for people claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) due to additional anti-fraud safeguards/reviews under newly enacted laws (PATH Act). While the IRS will continue to accept returns claiming EITC and ACTC the new law requires the IRS to hold refunds on tax returns claiming these popular credits, even if you have claimed it successfully in past years, until Feb. 15th 2017. Refund payments will subsequently be delayed past the current schedule up to the week of Feb 27th, 2017 or later (assuming all other items are in order). Also note that the IRS is required to hold  the entire refund — even the portion not associated with the EITC and ACTC. Note however that this refund hold only applies to the Additional Child tax credit. Not the standard Child tax credit.

The threshold for the other child related tax credit, known as the kiddie tax – meaning the amount of unearned net income that a child can take home without paying any federal income tax was is $1,050.  For 2017, the net unearned income for a child under the age of 19 (or a full-time student under the age of 24) that is not subject to “kiddie tax” is $2,100.

To clarify which child qualifies, From SavingToInvest.com

7. Child Tax Credit Qualification rules

The Child Tax Credit (CTC) covers children under 17 years-old and is available to tax paying parents or legal guardians on the child. Full CTC eligibility is subject to income limits as shown in the table above. The IRS has published additional information around claiming this credit via one or qualifying children. A Qualifying child for this credit is someone who meets the following criteria of six tests: age, relationship, support, dependent, citizenship, and residence:

  1. Age Test – To qualify, a child must have been under age of 17 (i.e. 16 years old or younger) at the end of the year in which the credit is being claimed for.
  2. Relationship Test – To claim a child for purposes of the Child Tax Credit, they must either be your son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister or a descendant of any of these individuals, which includes your grandchild, niece or nephew. An adopted child is always treated as your own child.
  3. Support Test – In order to claim a child for this credit, the child must not have provided more than half of their financial support in the given financial year the credit is being claimed for.
  4. Dependent Test – You must claim the child as a dependent on your federal tax return. No one else can claim the child.
  5. Citizenship Test – To meet the citizenship test, the child must be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or U.S. resident alien.
  6. Residence Test – The child must have lived with you for more than half of the year you are the claiming the credit for.
  7. Income Limitations – The credit is limited if your modified adjusted gross income is above a certain amount. Limits are shown in the table above based on filing status. The credit is reduced/phased-out by $50 for each $1,000 of income above the income threshold amounts.  The phaseout ranges are set by statute and so are not adjusted for inflation.
  8. In addition, the Child Tax Credit is generally limited by the amount of the income tax you owe as well as any alternative minimum tax (AMT) you owe.
  9. Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) – If the amount of your Child Tax Credit is greater than the amount of income tax you owe, you may be able to claim the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC). The ACTC is equal to the lesser of the un-allowed Child Tax Credit, or 15% of your earned income that is more than $3,000.

The Child tax credit can be claimed in addition to the existing credits (like the EITC) for Child Dependent Care expenses.

More from TurboTax:

8. Medical expenses

You can deduct any expense you pay for the prevention, diagnosis or medical treatment of physical or mental illness, and any amounts you pay to treat or modify any part or function of the body for health—but not for cosmetic purposes. (So you can deduct the cost of LASIK eye surgery to correct your vision, but not the BOTOX® Cosmetic injections to smooth the wrinkles around your eyes.) You can also deduct the cost of transportation to the locations where you can receive this kind of medical care, your health insurance premiums, and your costs for prescription drugs and insulin.

Medical expenses are only deductible if you itemize, and only if they exceed 10 percent of your Adjusted Gross Income. You can only deduct the medical and dental expenses that exceed those percentages.

There is a temporary exemption from Jan. 1, 2013 to Dec. 31, 2016 for individuals age 65 and older and their spouses. If you or your spouse are 65 years or older or turned 65 during the tax year you are allowed to deduct unreimbursed medical care expenses that exceed 7.5% of your adjusted gross income. The threshold remains at 7.5% of AGI for those taxpayers until Dec. 31, 2016.

Beginning Jan. 1, 2017, all taxpayers may deduct only the amount of the total un reimbursed allowable medical care expenses for the year that exceeds 10% of your adjusted gross income.

Example: Emma’s Adjusted Gross Income was $100,000, and she spent $8,000 on medical expenses. She and her spouse were both under age 65 in 2016. Because her expenses did not exceed 10 percent of her AGI, she cannot take the deduction for the amount above $7,500. Her deduction is $0.

Qualified long-term care expenses are treated as medical expenses subject to the 10 percent of AGI floor. Medical expenses also include the premiums you pay for qualified long-term care insurance. However, the amount of premium you can deduct is limited based on your age. For 2016, deductible premium amounts range from $390 to $4,870, depending on the covered person’s age at year end.

There is an exception for qualifying health insurance premiums paid by eligible self-employed individuals. Such costs can be deducted as adjustments to income which means eligible taxpayers can deduct 100 percent of their qualifying health insurance premiums on page 1 of Form 1040. (In other words, this write-off is available whether you itemize or not.)

Deducting medical expenses for someone else

You can deduct medical costs you pay directly to medical service providers for another person according to the following rules:

  • If you pay medical expenses for someone you do not claim as a dependent on your income tax return, you can deduct those expenses if:
    • He or she either lived with you for the entire year as a member of your household.
    • He or she is related to you (as described in the section  Who’s a Relative).
    • He or she was a U.S. citizen or legal resident, or was a resident of Canada or Mexico, for some part of the year.
    • You provided over half of his or her support for the year.

Note that these rules are slightly less stringent than those for the dependency exemption. For example, it’s possible that you can deduct medical expenses you paid for a parent in 2016, even though you can’t claim the parent as a dependent because his or her gross income exceeded $4,050.

  • If you paid a person’s medical bill this year for an expense incurred last year, and that person was your dependent last year, you can deduct the expenses on this year’s return even if he or she isn’t your dependent this year. The key factor is that the person was your dependent when the medical services were provided.
  • If you’re divorced and pay medical expenses for your child, but don’t claim him or her as a dependent because you are the non-custodial parent, you can still deduct those expenses. This assumes that you would qualify to take a dependency exemption for your child is you were the custodial parent.
  • You can deduct medical expenses that you pay for your spouse. What most people don’t know is that you can claim medical expenses for your spouse’s medical treatments that occurred before you were married if you paid those bills after your marriage. The rule is that you must be married either at the time of the medical treatments, or at the time the bills are paid.

For a complete list of qualified medical expenses, see IRS Publication 502: Medical and Dental Expenses.

9. Education expenses

In most cases, you can’t deduct the full amount of your child’s educational expenses because they are considered to be personal expenses. However, the following credits may help ease your tax burden:

  • Deduction for college tuition expenses. This deduction is available to you regardless of whether you itemize your deductions. The maximum deduction is $4,000. The maximum deduction drops to $2,000 and then disappears completely as income rises. Expenses eligible for the deduction are higher education tuition and mandatory enrollment fees. These same expenses are also eligible for the American Opportunity tax credit but you can’t take both in the same year.
  • American Opportunity and Lifetime Learning Credits. The American Opportunity Credit is a tax credit of up to $2,500 for all four years of a college education. Single taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) of $80,000 or less and married taxpayers with MAGI of $160,000 or less are eligible. If the American Opportunity credit is not available, the Lifetime Learning credit might be allowed. It applies to tuition and mandatory enrollment fees for just about any post-secondary course. It is 20 percent of the first $10,000 of eligible expenses to a maximum of $2,000. MAGI limits are $60,000 for single taxpayers and $120,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly. For more information on higher education tax breaks, see IRS Publication 970: Tax Benefits for Education.
  • Education Savings Accounts: Education Savings Accounts (ESAs) allow up to $2,000 each year to be contributed for each child under age 18. You can save a fairly sizable amount over several years. ESA contributions aren’t tax-deductible, but you can withdraw your investment and earnings tax-free as long as you use the funds to pay for college costs. If your child chooses not to attend college, you can transfer the balance to another member of the family. You can use the money from an ESA to pay for elementary and high school education, as well as for college educational costs. The ability to make ESA contributions is phased out for higher-income taxpayers.
  • Student loan interest: Interest on loans you take out to pay for college or vocational school expenses can also be deductible. The student loan interest deduction limit is $2,500 for qualified student loans, but the deduction is phased out for higher-income taxpayers. For 2016, the phase out begins at $120,000 on joint returns and at $60,000 for unmarried individuals.

10. Other ideas to consider

  • If you are the sole proprietor of your own business, consider employing your child (under the age of 18) for certain tasks. You can pay your child up to $6,300 in wages (the maximum standard deduction for the single person in 2016) without incurring income taxes and most employment taxes. The wages would be tax-free to your young employee and you could deduct the wages as a business expense on your own tax return.
  • If you have a child going to college in another area, consider purchasing a house or a condominium for your child to live in. By treating the house or condo as a second home, you can deduct the mortgage interest and real estate taxes on your own tax return.

Baby-proofing Tips to Follow Before Bringing Home Your Newborn

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Bringing home your newborn baby can be scary. They’re so small and delicate it seems like anything could happen. Take the time to safety proof your home room by room so you can be more focused on lullabies and joys of parenthood.

Bedroom

While you already know to cover your electrical outlets and keep small items off the floor, there are other hazards you may not be aware of in your baby’s room. Start with the crib. Parents recommends getting a fixed-side crib (instead of a drop-side crib) so your baby isn’t at risk of hurting themselves if the drop side breaks or to protect them once they’re big enough to start getting themselves out of the crib. You also should keep the crib empty of stuffed animals and other big, cushy items because they can pose a suffocation hazard to small babies, and they can be used as a step stool to climb out of the crib when they’re older.


Furniture stays are also a big help since little kids like to walk, climb, push, and test their boundaries. You need to make sure that any large furniture (dressers, bookshelves, carts) is attached to a wall or fixed in place so it can’t tip over.

Kitchen

Kitchens don’t have to be a dangerous place for your baby. Your new favorite item will be cabinet locks. By putting them on, your child won’t be able to get into a drawer full of knives or glass items (and then you won’t have to worry about picking up all the Tupperware they threw on the floor). You also should invest in an oven lock. While the oven door may seem too heavy for them to open, you don’t want to risk any accidental burns.

You also need to make sure everything is out of your child’s reach. Though this might not be a big deal when they’re just a few months old, it’s a good habit to get into as they become more mobile. Cook on the back burners of your stove and turn the handles inward to make sure your baby can’t pull off any hot pans. You also should put hazardous items, such as cleaning supplies and knives, in high cabinets with a safety lock. Avoid hanging choking hazards on your fridge, such as magnets, and keep any glass items out of reach.

Living Room

You’ll spend most of your time in the living room with your family. Make sure that all electrical outlets are covered with baby-proof sockets and that all wires and cords are tucked away where they can’t be reached by small, curious hands. You may want to put baby guards around the corners of your tables and secure any decorations that could be pulled off your coffee table or entertainment center.

Set up a home automation system to help you feel more secure. With this tool you can set your alarm system, lock your doors and control the lighting and temperature of the room. These home automation features are perfect when you can’t move the sleeping baby in your lap. A video surveillance camera also can work as a nanny cam, so you can check in on your baby when they’re with a babysitter. It can also work as a baby monitor, so you can watch your baby while they’re sleeping.

As your baby grows and becomes more mobile, you’ll need to update your safety proofing. Make sure to periodically go through your rooms and check for any potential hazards. Enjoy this special time without having to worry about your child’s safety.

Easter 2017: How Celebrities Celebrated the Holiday (PHOTOS)

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A lot of the celeb moms we’ve featured in the past shared what they did on Easter with their fans and followers on social media. Here is a roundup of some of the fun festivities!

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After attending church in Bel-Air, the Kardashian-Jenner clan had an Easter Egg Hunt and Roll with animals. Chrissy Teigen and her daughter Luna were there.

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Princess Eugenie, Princess Beatrice, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (nee Kate Middleton) attended the Easter Day service at St George’s Chapel in Windsor, England.

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Kim Kardashian-West shared a family photo of herself, husband Kanye West and their two children North and Saint on her Instagram account. Check out North with the choker and she looks just like her dad.

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Singer Monica also hosted an elaborate Easter Egg Hunt and party at her home. Her daughter Laiyah, outfitted in the cutest hot pink jumpsuit seems pleased. Monica also sparked a bunch of comments speculating that she is expecting in this photo. She too is wearing a paisley off the shoulder jumpsuit that is gapping at the center, creating the illusion of a bump. Whether one is there or not, who knows.

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Ashlee Simpson Ross and her daughter Jagger Snow looked cute for Easter outfitted in matching Coachella wear Bohemian Mini-dresses.

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Kandi Burruss and son Ace Tucker Wells attended Monica’s Easter Egg Roll and Hunt party too.

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Lady Antebellum lead singer Hillary Scott shared a really creative looking aerial shot of herself with her daughter doing Easter activities.

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Tamera Mowry-Housley and hubby Adam posed with their kids daughter Ariah and son Aden in their Easter best.

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Sadly, over at her sister Tia Mowy Hardrict‘s home, all was quiet because her son Cree was battling strep, her her Instagram post.

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Check out Gisele Bundchen and Tom Brady‘s daughter Vivian  in her bunny ears egg hunting on the beach.

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Victoria Beckham gets in the spirit, donning a bunny mask that looks like the signature bunny on her clothing. She looks great and this is the curviest I’ve ever seen her and they look good on her.

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CaCee Cobb and Donald Faison‘s kids, Wilder and Rocco, posed with the Easter Bunny.

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Soleil Moonfrye is certainly blessed as she said, captioning this photo of the Easter bounty she amassed for her children.