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20+ Swimming Season Spirit Gear and Gifts

Photo by Etienne Girardet

I am a Swim mom but this year, because of COVID, my family decided to skip joining the Summer recreational league swim team.

I am certainly going to miss it. love it even though it’s a tough job. Being a swim mom (or dad) involves getting up at the crack of dawn to load the car, pick up your team snack bar contributions, and schlep the family to the pool in time for warm-ups, then spending upwards to 4-5 hours standing up volunteering as a timer, runner or scorekeeper.

To make up for losing a year, I decided to treat myself with a swim mom-related t-shirt or other souvenirs to wear, cherish, and show off. Here is what I have my eye on, mainly from Etsy.

[Note; If you swim parents out there decide to beat me to it to purchase any of these items, I earn a small commission as an Etsy affiliate.]

I love this “I can Fly” tee shirt which is a take off of the Butterfly stroke.  ($24)

In this COVID-19 era, people are wearing masks that reflect their personalities, likes and passions so this Swimming Face Mask is perfect. ($19.99)

This Tears of my Swimmers wine cup is great for a mom or a coach or a mom who is also a coach. ($25)

Add this Swim mom pendant to your toggle bracelet ($13.95)

Your swimmer will heartily appreciate this personalized swim print ($10.95)

Get this wooden display plaque to hang all your swimmers’ swimming medals ($36.99)

You can never go wrong with personal swim bag tags ($12.99)

Your swimmer will appreciate being able to send greetings and personal notes with these personalized swim note cars ($2)

For the mom who has a daughter or daughters on the swim team, get this personalized matching mom-daughter tumbler set ($33)

I’m a cap girl so I found this cap with a swimmer inside a heart so adorable! Swim cap- $19.89

Be chic  and rep your kid’s sport with these cute assorted “Swim Mom” graphic t-shirts (starting at $10)

Parents: 4 Tips For Setting Screen Time Limits Pandemic

Photo by Julia M Cameron from Pexels

With a summer overshadowed by COVID-19, parents are taking a hard look at how to make the right decisions regarding their kids’ increased reliance on screens— which are helping to maintain a sense of normalcy during this socially-distanced time— while also finding the right balance with other important activities.

TV, streaming platforms, and app downloads have all seen notable in their use since the pandemic started, and children’s television viewing has also skyrocketed as parents across the world are increasingly turning to screens and technology to entertain and engage their kids.

To get further insights into kids’ screen time habits and behaviors during the pandemic, Brainly the world’s largest online learning community for students, parents, and teachers— surveyed 5,000 U.S. students (grades 6th-12th, ages 11-18) on its platform.

Some shocking insights were discovered. Consider this: About 25% of kids spend more than 9 hours every day looking at a screen. That screen time has led to just over 50% of students reporting headaches, soreness, and dry or irritated eyes. Since the pandemic began, students said they are spending at least 50% more time in front of screens daily.

Given the unprecedented situation we are facing which has brought on copious new challenges, the traditional boundaries and limits for screen time need to be reassessed.

So, how can parents handle screen time during the pandemic? Eric Oldfield, Chief Business Officer of Brainly and father of two school-age daughters, has a few tips for parents to consider when deciding the best course of action.

  • Not all screen time is created equal. It’s important for parents to assess how their child is spending their screen time with this in mind. Consuming content to gain information and get creative, as well as collaborating or socializing with their peers, is a great way for kids to maintain connections and continue learning during this unique time. However, time spent playing non-educational video games and watching mindless TV should be more closely monitored. 



  • Designate specific times the entire family unplugs. To avoid battles, it’s best to establish and communicate boundaries before your children start using devices, and sticking to those limits as much as possible. Children, especially younger ones, often crave structure, especially during unpredictable times. It’s still good, for instance, for everyone to eliminate screen use for at least one hour or two before bedtime to avoid impacting sleep cycles. 



  • Make sure screentime consumption is done healthily. Parents may want to consider having their children use blue screen glasses or switching their computer display screen settings to make sure their eyes are protected from harmful blue light. It’s also a good idea to ensure kids don’t sit too close to the screen, get up for a break at least once an hour, and sit with good posture while on the computer for hours on end doing schoolwork. 



  • Come up with a plan that makes sense for your children. As a parent, you know your child better than anyone else and are therefore the best person to decide what and how much media use is the right amount. Remember that screens are no longer the enemies of social interaction, learning, and productivity. Rather, they are enabling people around the world to work and learn and communicate with others during this uncertain time.

    The real enemies of healthy development in children are the same as adults: a sedentary lifestyle, social isolation, and distractions from schoolwork and learning. Using screens too much can contribute to all of these problems – but they can also counter them.  

  • The COVID-19 pandemic could last for a long time, so as families create new routines, it’s always best to focus on habits that are practical and sustainable. Above all else, don’t feel guilty about turning to screens more than you used to.

    Recreate These Backyard Living Spaces on a Budget {Ideas}

    lavish Dessert rose outdoor, side porch backyard space


    Now that people are confined to entertaining themselves at home due to global stay home quarantine orders, those with backyards, patios and balconies are designing and decorating these spaces to expand their at home living, play and dining  rooms to the outdoors.

    I was invited to a Facebook group with women who have been mulching, trimming, hedging, hauling and performing tiny miracles to transform their neglected or underutilized back porches and yard space into tiny oasis. I have been thoroughly impressed. Those with large acres of land have more to work with but even if you live in a small space or an apartment, there are options.

    Redecorating your backyard can be as simple as putting up string lights  you can get at Target for $5, dusting off old pillows from the basement and situating them on ignored patio chairs, color coordinating the potted plants, and upgrading your table or investing in an umbrella and solar outdoor lighting. That’s what I did and am currently doing as I am inspired. (see my set up so far in the last photo of this post)

    I sourced 7 backyard living spaces inspirations and found places on line where you can order the same or similar items in these spaces to achieve a similar look and aesthetic. Check them out:

    southwest rustic themed backyard living space idea to recreate

    What I like most about this backyard living set up is the rustic, Southwest Aztec detailing. From the ottomon to the throw rug, every piece of the design elements tie together. The outdoor lighting is a mix of rustic lanterns, candles and string lights.  Wooden benches offer ample room for entertaining family who may come by during a time in your life when you are entertaining intimate family as guests. The potted and planted greenery breath extra serenity into this space. I love it!

     RECREATE THIS SPACE

    Christopher Knight Outdoor Acacia Wood and Rustic Metal Bench ($134)

    nuLOOM Kellee Contemporary Wool Area Rug, 5′ x 8′, Black ($99)

    Torched Star Waterproof Outdoor Patio Lights ($17.88)

    JhY Designs Brushed Antique Hanging Lanterns Set ($49)

     

    bird nest egg wicker chair outdoor

    Photo by Subham Majumder from Pexels

    Now the wicker bird next or egg chair is a common item you may see being shown off by the Instagram Martha Stewarts in  your life. This chair is the perfect pod to escape to read a book, for your little one to watch a YouTube video or instructioal video when school starts on her tablet. Working from home? Escape the noise and interruption of distance learners, spouses and your teen and take your call on this thing. Use pillows to tie it in with the color scheme of your outdoor living space.

     RECREATE THIS SPACE

    Christopher Knight Home Indoor/Outdoor Tear Drop Hanging Chair ($219)

    or Get Hampton Bay’s version with the stand at Home Depot for $499

    large outdoor backyard patio living space idea to recreate

    For those amongst us with a larger budget and space to work with, transform a patio or space in the back part of your backyard into a desert oasis. Hire a contractor to instal a brick or stone patio, or intall durable outdoor flooring for a lower cost alternative (though this option may not be sustainable). Purchase a gazebo, panels, and planters.  Frame the space with panel curtains, add patio furniture, pilows, and an outdoor rug and you’ve got your own mini paradise right at home.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    IKEA 4-seat conversation set ($785)

    Snowcity Outdoor Waterproof ($19.99 per panel)

    Bed Bath and Beyond Mayne Cape Cod Square Patio Planter ($57.99 each)

    PILL BOX college dorm essentials packing list

    10×10 feet Gazebo ($399)

    PILL BOX college dorm essentials packing list



    medium outdoor living backyard space idea to recreate

    For those of us with less space and a more modest budget, we can use artificial turf, wooden coffee tables and wrought iron dining sets accented with pillows and colorful seasonal plants and have our own little comfortable backyard or patio space to escape to or enjoy a meal at on occassion.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    wicker and glass outdoor dining table

    San Simeon Outdoor Wicker Rectangular Dining Table with Tempered Glass Top ($248)

    PILL BOX college dorm essentials packing list

    Hampton Bay Wicker Coffee table ($229)

    small outdoor living space idea

    We cannot forget our townhouse, condo and apartment dwellers! They too have options when it comes to revitalizing underused outdoor spaces. It might be a tighter squeeze but a small dining table and two chair set, with a wicker love seat and just the right small area rug and potted florals are all that are needed to create a nice nook. If there is room, you can certainly invest in a small umbrella to add shading for hot days.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    small outdoor living space to recreate

    Ikea’s SALTHOLMEN Table and 2 folding chairs ($79) 

    Hanging Umbrella with base ($118)

    PILL BOX college dorm essentials packing list

    And this is my set up which is a work in progress… teenager not included!

    Copy These Back to School Homeschool Workstation Set Ups

    Back to steal workstation idea 1

    Every year, I share a post on how to set up a homework station where work will get done.[ Read that post here].

    This year, now that more and more school systems across America and the globe have decided to continue distance learning, I think it is time we all step it up a notch and start being more deliberate, intentional and strategic about setting up a home school set up that works.

    I mean no more allowing your grown rug rats to study in the basement or in their rooms where there is a TV and video games there to distract them and keep them unfocused on the daily assignments.

    Also, no more leaving it up to them to schedule their work and break times.

    In real school, their teachers alot for scheduled breaks from instruction and you should too. So, I scoured the Internets and my Pinterest feed and came up with a few  workstations that you can copy and try to replicate this month before school officially launches next month.

    Check them out with affiliate links to sources where you can buy some of the items you’ll see in these dreamy set ups!

     

    If you have a small nook in your home that you can comfortably squeeze in a table and desk, do so because it’s ideal for removing distractions by having your child confined to the equivalent of a pod space so they can focus. I like the idea of a large chalkboard stationed above them that can be used to jot down drills, motivational words like in the above poster or their schedule.

    The rustic cannisters affixed to the wall in this set up are great for housing supplies like pens, pencils, sharpeners, rulers, etc so your child or children have no excuse to leave this space during instructional or homework time.  The closest thing I could find similar to achieve this similar set up were bathroom storage containers on Amazon for like $29.98 otherwise make do with pieces you already have at home.  If you’re handy, hammer a storage bin or affix one to the wall  using 3M command strips.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    Buy this Rustic Framed magnetic chalk board, 18″ x 22″ ($38.18)

    For people who live in small spaces and do not have a dedicated space away from distractions, you might want to set up your child’s work station in your dining room or eating area. Why is this a good idea? Because this space is usually an open area so you can keep an eye on them to make sure they are doing their work or watching their zoom or Google classroom instructions.

    Ideally, you have to use a wireless router or have a wired connection if you need to set up a computer, tablet or desktop in this space. But for the most part, sacrificing a corner of your dining room could be a great option.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    AmazonBasics Kids Solid Wood Table and 2 Chair Set ($79.99)

     

    It can be tempting to store items away to keep things looking neat but keeping supplies like art supplies- crayons, markers, paints, chalk, etc. in glass jars are great for making sure they are in mind and available to use as an option during instructional breaks in lieu of watching TV or gaming. That was the idea that blogger Tiffany of Raising Lemons had when she arranged her supplies on a shelf in her kitchen like this in this photo from her website. I love it!

    1 Gallon Anchor Hocking Glass Storage Heritage Hill Jar ($14.99)

     

    Ordinarily I would think that you need to be at a desk and in a chair to concentrate but when reading a book or scrolling a device doing research, it might just be better if your child is  in a comfortable seat and that’s where a big old bean bag chair may come in handy. We used to have a papasan and it was wonderful space for reading a good book. If you have unconventional seating somewhere in your home, drag it out into the work space or grab one online.

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    Source

    Memory Foam Bean Bag Chair ($72.51)

    Now if you have the space and room for more furnishings, you might want to consider investing in a new multifunctional shelving unit that can accommodate baskets for holding binders, notebooks and other large items and a farm table with a bench. The larger table can allow your young scholar to spread out and situate various supplies, papers, and pens and more across a larger space. Some kids are messy and others just like to see their options sprawled out all over the place. A large farm style table will accomplish this.

    source

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    Farmhouse table and bench ($199.99)

    TRYING TO CONCEIVE THIS YEAR? DOWNLOAD MY FREE FERTILITY 100 EBOOK

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    source

    Collapsible Storage Bins ($19.99)

    IKEA Billy Bookshelf ($158)

     

    I think everything on any homeschool or distance learning station needs proper lighting. A nice standing lamp or a good desk lamp that varies in degree of illumination will be perfect. Whether your kid prefers to work in the early morning or the wee hours of the night like my kids do, they will need to be able to read their text and good lighting is part of that.

    Children’s Author’s 10 Tips For Managing Quarantine Life with Kids

     

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

    LED Desk Lamp ($43.99)

    6 Self Care Tips While Working From Home

    In addition to a comfy lounge chair for reading, I think every child should be seated in a comfy office chair if possible that is good for their back.

    You don’t have to get a brand new chair either. I purchased most of our office chairs for our work spaces for five people from second hand online marketplaces like Facebook Marketplace. If it is within your budget, you should invest in a good quality chair with solid ergonomics. They’ll be occupying a lot of space at home working so they should be set up properly.

    The 3 Step Guide for Setting Up Your Quarantine Homeschool

    RECREATE THIS SPACE

     

    Ikea Swivel Chair ($149)

    No matter what you do, study your child’s habits from Spring semester and adjust the workstation to suit your child’s learning needs and habits. It can really make a difference as to whether you will have a successful fall semester or not.

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    Book Your Pre-College Drop Off Quarantine Stay STAT {Vrb v Airbnb}

    As some colleges and universities start to open up their campuses, many in states like New York managing their COVID cases well are requiring students arriving from hot spot states to quaratine 14 days before the first day of classes.

    The problem is that not all schools have plans to open up their dorms two weeks ahead of the launch of the fall season, leaving parents scrambling for options and places to say.

    My husband and I found ourselves in this peculiar conundrum as our state of Maryland, which had been making steady strides towards flattening the coronavirus new cases curve took a turn in the opposite direction recently.

    I decided to turn to my old stand by resource for booking vacation properites Home Away, now called Vrbo (Vacation rental by owner).  It is similar to Airbnb which was the original distruptor in the vacation accommodations industry, and is now the world’s largest online marketplace for lodgings, with listings growing more than 100% each year, one study found — hurting the hotel market in the process.

    Home-sharing services exploded across the globe over the past decade, as millions of people decided sleeping in a stranger’s bed was a worthwhile price to pay for living like a local in a given city. Airbnb is now the world’s largest online marketplace for lodgings, with listings growing more than 100% each year, one study found — hurting the hotel market in the process.

    Vrbo also has a pretty substantial footprint in America and has been around since 1995. The biggest difference is that all of its 2 million properties in 190 countries are entire homes, meaning, you cannot just rent a room or floor in the home.

    As with Airbnb, Vrbo also lets you book your stay via its app or website. Y0u can filter location, dates, number of guests and get to view an interactive map with a digital push pin showing you on the map the location of the rental property.

    Vrbo also stands out from Airbnb in the fact that you can also do a deeper level of filtering: Travelers can search 25 different types of homes (ranging from apartment to castle), 13 location types (like oceanfront or downtown), safety and accessibility features (like wheelchair accessible and low-allergen environment). You can also filter by neighborhood, rating, features and amenities, nearby activities and more.

    Prices depend on the quality of property, demand and inclue a guest service fee whhc is between 12-13% of thecost of the rental. Because of Covid, all home owners have added in an additional $100 for a deep cleaning fee in between uses. Both services include payment protection, 24/7 customer service, and rebooking assistance for last-minute cancellations.

    Because our entire family will be accompanying us on the journey to college drop off, an entire house rental was a better option to a hotel especially given we will have to house all of our son’s dorm furnishings and supplies for days in advance until his move in date.

    With so many things in flux and in the air because of these uncertain times, it is a great idea to purchase the vacation insurance which is usually under $100 and totally worth it. You never know what will happen day to day.

    If you’re a parent of a college bound kid, consider these two options for accommodating your family pre-move in this year and do BOOK fast as properties are flying off the market given the demand.

    Search for your stay for FREE on Airbnb

    Or you can search for FREE on Vrbo!

    13 Free Reources to Beat Summer Brain Drain and Keep Your Child Ahead of the Class

    It might be tempting to lie around, post videos to TikTok or watch Netflix all day. Instead high schoolers should use this time to learn a new skill, take an interesting course or prepare for standardized tests like the SAT or ACT. Here are 13 free resources for high school students to get ahead while school is out.

    1. Khan Academy

    Khan Academy offers daily schedules for students ages 4-18. The free website also has courses in math, physics, U.S. history, grammar, economics and biology. High school sophomores and juniors can also find free SAT practice questions and tests. Even though the upcoming SAT administrations have been canceled or postponed, students still might want to prepare for this important exam.

    2. edX

    Even though your classes and extracurricular activities have been canceled, it doesn’t mean you should stop learning. EdX is an online platform that offers more than 2,500 courses online for free. Taking an online course is a great way to boost your resume and prove to colleges you can handle challenging material. Take this time to learn a new skill or explore a possible major from institutions like MIT, Harvard, University of California-Berkeley and more.

    3. Coursera

    Coursera is another e-learning platform that allows you to be taught by professors from Ivy League schools and other elite schools like the University of Pennsylvania, Stanford and Duke. All the courses are available for free, and topics available include C++, marketing, engineering and psychology. By taking these advanced courses, you can explore a possible major choice when you go to college.

    4. Quill

    Quill is offering its services for free to anyone affected by school closures. The interactive writing site is perfect for anyone who wants to brush up on their craft before writing their college admissions essays. On Quill, you can gain editing skills by proofreading passages, practicing grammar skills through short activities and advancing your writing.

    5. Duolingo

    The cognitive benefits of learning another language are undeniable. Studies have shown that being bilingual can benefit memoryproblem-solving abilities and even intelligenceDuolingo is a free app that high school students should take advantage of now. Some schools offer limited foreign language options, but through Duolingo, students can learn Spanish, French, Italian, Japanese, Arabic, Hindi, Russian and many more. If you want, you can even learn fictional languages like Klingon and High Valyrian.

    6. Codecademy

    While you might not be thinking about the job market just yet, coding is one of the most valuable skills that you can pick up. Codecademy is offering Pro scholarships to students affected by school closures. On the free site, you can choose what to learn, including building websites to analyze data. You’ll learn by doing and can start writing code within a few minutes of joining the site.

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    6 Ways to Stay Healthy During Summer Travel In the COVID Era

    By Durisan

    Summer is here, which normally means it’s time to take a vacation! In the age of the Coronavirus Pandemic, many plans are being changed or curtailed. No matter where you’re going, if you’re not prepared, a potentially amazing holiday can turn out to be the worst.

    Here are our summer health tips to make sure everything goes smoothly and as safely as possible.

    1 Wash your hands regularly

    It might seem obvious, but this is your best and easiest way to stay healthy while you’re traveling. Regular handwashing can help prevent COVID-19 transmission as well as more routine illnesses like diarrhea and respiratory infections. Washing up can also help you avoid bacteria such as E. coli and salmonella, which can cause major gastrointestinal issues (or even something worse). You’ll also remove germs left from a sneeze or other factors that can cause colds and other illnesses that can ruin your trip.

    And consider the health and habits of the people around you. Take antibacterial wipes to deal with germy surfaces, such as a gas pump, door handles, or hotel room surfaces.

    2 Eat and drink in moderation

    There’s no shame in indulging when you’re on vacation, but try to keep a balance between occasional splurges and nutritious food. For example, if you’re planning a big dinner, try eating light vegetables during the day.

    Also, try to eat vegetables at least once daily while traveling. Dark, leafy greens are especially a good choice: They can improve your mood and energy.

    To further protect your health, try to eat outdoors whenever possible and avoid smaller, older restaurants. Getting to-go orders is a smart alternative as well and provide the opportunity for a fun family picnic.

    3 Stay hydrated

    It can be challenging to drink enough water when you’re busy enjoying the summer and sightseeing. However, dehydration can cause headaches, fatigue and even serious health problems.

    Here are some useful tips:

    • Bring an empty bottle to the airport and fill it at the terminal.
    • Keep a bottle of water with you everywhere you go — and make sure you bring extra water for any children traveling with you.
    • Download an app to track your water intake and get notifications.

    4 Get enough sleep

    Vacation is a time for both play and rest. If you get less than six hours of sleep per night, even for just a week, you’re more likely to get a common cold than people who sleep more. If your body is thrown off from jet-lag, try taking a melatonin pill on the first night or two in your new environment. This will prepare your body to relax at your new bedtime.

    5 Get some exercise

    Even if you need a relaxing vacation where rest is the only thing you’ve planned, try to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day. Exercising on vacation can help you recover from any stiffness from sleeping in a new bed, and it improves your overall energy level. Consider exercising outdoors and avoiding enclosed gyms and studios. 

    6 Use your sunscreen

    Days spent at the pool or the beach mean more exposure to the sun’s harmful rays. Use a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30 and apply it every couple of hours or when you’re sweaty and/or wet. This will reduce your risk for skin cancer. Hats are great extra protection for you and your kids.

    Get Your Child To Cooperate with These Tips

    By Marcia Hall

    From your toddler touching everything in sight to your teenager ignoring everything you tell her, children who don’t cooperate can be frustrating. Here are a few simple rules to follow to increase the amount of cooperation you get from your child.

    Help map out the day as best you can for your child. Often, parents have an idea of what the day will be like, but fail to communicate those plans to their child. When possible, help her envision your day by communicating it with her either that morning or the night before. Younger children will need this to be repeated, so it can help to recap it a few times. It is true that plans might change, but changes will be easier if she knew what the plan was in the first place.

    Give warnings when time is coming close for transitions to take place. Children tend to live entirely in the present, so they are usually completely engrossed in the activity they are involved in at any given moment. This is obvious for younger children, but is also true of older children. By giving your child warnings when you need to leave in 10 minutes, your child can begin to finish with what she has started. Timers can be a big help for these warnings for both you and your child. A timer can not only keep you on track to follow through with the time you allotted, but will also give your child an auditory clue to listen for.

    Provide your child with choices so that she feels in control of the situation to some degree. It is very difficult for your child to be at the mercy of the adults in her life. Often times, the errands or activities she is being forced to participate in are not activities she would choose to do. You can ease this frustration by making small parts of the day her choice. Small children do well with two or three choices. “Do you want to wear the blue boots, the red shoes or the purple clogs?” Older children can help you decide where you will go first or what music you will listen to along the way. Simple choices can make the difference between a cranky child who drags her feet and a cooperative child who does what is asked of her. Giving teens the choice can relieve some of the pressure too. “The garbage needs to go out before 6AM tomorrow. Do you want to do it before you go to bed or early in the morning” You may know the most common sense option is to do it now and get it over with. But giving your child the option can ease the tension often felt by parents and teens.

    Create excitement for the thing you are trying to get your child to cooperate in doing. You might be so caught up in completing your to-do list that you forget to enjoy the process. You are motivated to get the tasks complete because you can see the outcome. Your child could not care less about that outcome, she just wants to have fun. So if you want her to cooperate with you, you will need to bring a little fun to the to-do list. If you are running errands, build a little fun break into every other stop. If you are in the car for a long time, find some games to play, such as I-Spy or 20 questions. Help keep her mind going and you will find she is much more compliant.

    Make sure all her physical needs are met before asking her to do something you know she will be resistant about. Is your child hungry, thirsty, tired, overstimulated, cold/hot or sick? It is hard for adults to operate when they have these needs. Your child will be understandably cranky when she needs food or has simply had too much. Take a break and don’t expect your child to do too much.

    Make sure your child has enough time for play in her day. Parents today have a tendency to overschedule their children, filling their time with sports, art and other activities. The thought is that an active mind is a healthy mind. To a degree, this is true. However, if the mind of a child is not given the opportunity to think creatively and freely, it will begin to shut down. This is when children become easily agitated, inflexible and unsatisfied. To ensure that you have a more cooperative and helpful child, make sure that your child is given enough time for free play both with you and by herself.

    Parents dream of a child who gets her shoes on the first time they ask or takes the garbage out when it needs to go out.

    Though it may not be possible for your child to do this with 100% accuracy, it is possible to improve her cooperation level.

    7 Playlists for Your 4th of July CookOut

    Photo by KaLisa Veer on Unsplash

    A lot of folks are staying home or close to home today because of the COVID restrictions. If you’re one of said families and you are looking for music or playlists to jam to while you enjoy a backyard, frontyard, driveway or balcolny cookout, here is a compilation of various music by genre:

    Dance

    Oldies 80s, 90s and 2000s

    Trap

    Mine is a mix of Soca, Reggaeton, Popmusic and rap

    Country

    Pop Rock



    Modern R&B, Hip Hop

    My personal faves that make me think of America: