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10 Ways Parenting Will Be Different in the New Decade {Predictions}

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Now that I’ve reviewed the parenting trends of the past, from a celebrity perspective, let’s take a look at the top parenting trends that we can expect in the coming decade.

From Helicopter to Free Range Parenting, child raising techniques and patterns change over time, with each generation and with scholarship and research.

There really is no right way to accomplish this fine craft and art of raising decent human beings from newborns to young adult.

However, each generation adopts varying habits and patterns that mark their eras in distinctive ways.

The Millennial Generation has already established itself as separate and almost the anti-Generation of its Gen X and Baby Boomer generations that precedes it.

One report indicates that 82% of babies born each year is to Millennial moms, so here is how this new generation of parents are creating new trends for the next decade.

1.More traveling with baby and small children

Parents will be less timid about taking their babies and small children with them while traveling the world.

The concept of traveling with children is not new but was limited to trips to Disney world or roadtrips in the Summer to the Grand Canyon.  Of course, we always had those bold wanderlust or Peace Corp types of parents who were never fearful about picking up their toddler and heading to the Andes but they were in the minority.

A new report by Resonance Consultancy points to the increasing importance of Millennials to the family travel market.

Travel Agents Report states that “44 percent of Millennial travelers take their vacations with the kids in tow,” according to the firm’s new Future of U.S. Millennial Travel report.

More than half (58%) of U.S. Millennials who traveled overnight last year have children under the age of 18 in the household, Resonance learned.

Once kids enter the picture, Millennial parents continue to travel.

Now and in the future, millennial parents will not even hesitate to do so. Many are open to the idea of home schooling their children while living and working as digital nomads abroad. They do not think a child necessarily needs in-school instructions. As a result, we will see more children grow up as students of the world.

The well traveled child is the future.

2. Making home made baby food

In the last decade alone, American spending on baby food has dropped dramatically, and there’s a growing emphasis on making baby food at home.

Millennial parents have grown up in the age of information, and generally speaking, it shows.

They’re not feeding their kids the super-processed, questionably-nutritious baby and kid food of yore, and they want to maintain their principles of eco-minded, earth- and animal-friendly living once they become parents.

And according to Forbes, newer baby food brands are catering to them by partnering up with nutritionists and food engineers to offer sustainable biodynamic food sourcing and processes.

Because Millennial parents of all economic classes want nutritious, organic, science-backed food for their babies , their babies Generation Alpha will be the best fed kids.

3. More Baby wearing, Less investment in multiple strollers

Not long ago, the stroller was a status symbol. Posh parents would have purchased more than two strollers by the time their child reached Kindergarten: a baby carriage or infant car system, a jogging stroller and a toddler stroller.

Nowadays, it’s all about baby-wearing. Also, newer parents have less income and are interested in sustainable living, less waste and extravagance. They do not rely on things like strollers to make a statement.

The term “babywearing” was coined by William Sears, a California-based pediatrician who in 1992 wrote “The Baby Book,” which popularized the concept of “attachment parenting.”

Along with co-sleeping and extended breast-feeding, baby carrying is a core tenet of that parenting approach, which is supposed to nurture a closer attachment between parent and baby and ultimately a healthier child.

The future of parenting is more engaged and connected parents and baby wearing is part of that.

4. Single by Choice/More cohabitation before marriage or without plans to ever marry

Beginning with Generation X, women have been willing to have babies on their own, or elect to just co-habitate with a partner and skip getting married altogether. However, most eventually bowed to societal pressure to find the one, exchange vows and have kids.

Future parents are not willing to be handcuffed by societal rules and tradition.

In 2009, the oldest millennials were in their 20s and as The Wall Street Journal reports, of those older millennials who did have kids, most were unmarried.

And generally, what is norm has changed.

A Pew report finds that just 46% of kids in 2016 were living in a household with two married parents in their first marriage, compared to 61% in 1980.

Generation Z is coming up behind the Millenial generation and are said to be more financially savvy,  the next era of parents will be even less constrained by standards of traditional practices.

Their family planning practices will reflect this prediction.

5. More demanding about Parental Leave

Dads in the Generation Y are also leading the charge in changing gender-based roles in the home, and likewise will change policies related to parental leave.

Millennial dads are more likely to take paternity leave after their spouses or partners have a child.  They are also more likely to be stay at home dads and to baby wear.

A Business Insider report states that “millennial dads are far more likely than their fathers were to take time off work after the birth of a baby” and quotes a 2016 Cornell University study  which asserts that dads who take longer paternal leave tend to be more engaged and involved with their kids in the long run.

That same report indicated that “in 1989, only 10% of these stay-at-home parents were dads, whereas today, stay-at-home fathers account for 17% of such caregivers” and noted that while “women still account for the vast majority of parents in this role, but the numbers are on a course toward more balance.”

Further,it states that in many dual-income millennial homes in which both parents work full time (that’s 46% of households, according to Pew), the mother is the primary earner.

They are making private companies and the government adjust to this new dynamic.

Millennial parents have influenced employers such as Microsoft and Netflix to announce significant expansions to their paid parental leave benefits.

As more private companies start to offer extended family leave and generous paternity leave, future parents from up and down the socioeconomic ladder will start expecting and even demanding adequate time off after welcoming a child to the family.

They will also be more likely to support laws or support candidates that propose new laws standardizing and expanding parental leave policies and laws.

6. More Social Media – Less Friends/Family as Advice Source

Parents will be more comfortable about sharing photos of their children in social media and some with actually brand their children from birth, similar to the way celebrities do now.

About 4 in 5 millennials admit to posting a picture of their kid online at least once, according to a poll conducted by TIME and Survey Monkey. Half of baby boomers, meanwhile, have never posted a photo of their kids online, as well as 30% of Gen X parents.

A Business Insider report about how Millennials use their children as status symbols state they are spending up to $100,000 on things like Instagram-worthy nurseries.

Month-by-Month posts for the first  year of a baby’s life and fabulous color coordinated themed first birthday parties are a thing that Instagram following are made of!

Being that the new generation of parents are more digital conscious and aware, they will continue to skip friends and family for advice and turn to Google.

A recent New York Times article states that millennial parents go to Google, chat rooms, and apps for parenting advice and as one expert told the paper, “Google is the new grandparent, the new neighbor, the new nanny.”

7. Creative Names and Less Formal Names with History and Meaning

“Finding a name that has authentic roots, but is completely undiscovered, is the ultimate baby name status symbol,” Pamela Redmond Satran, a founder of the site Nameberry and author of “The Nameberry Guide to Off-the-Grid Baby Names,” told Alex Williams of The New York Times.

The future of parenting will include names that are not necessarily connected to a family or tradition.

In fact, more Millennial parents are reportedly looking for a name that is not already attached to a domain.

Also, that New York Times article mentions that many millennial parents are giving their kids personal hashtags and YouTube channels.

8. Raising Gender Neutral Children

With more awareness of LGBTQ issues and variances of how members of that community identify, modern and Millennial parents are cognizant about how they label their children. In year’s past, we followed strict gender identity and roles. To put it bluntly, children were either male or female. However, in the coming years, more parents will be open with raising children without subjecting them to or assigning them gender identity.  Future parents may be more likely to let their kids determine for themselves how they want to identify.

A Euromonitor international report states that middle class parents in developed world, especially older Millennials who are becoming parents, are taking a more gender-neutral approach to child raising, using neutral colors and with names suitable for either gender proving popular.

9. Less Religious – More Spiritual or Non Religious

A lot of holidays in secular society have become so homogenized and commercial that it is very easy for a child raised in a non-religious household to not feel left out. Christmas, Easter even Halloween and Day of the Dead which have cultural and spiritual origins are practiced and recognized by people who do not go to Church or follow the initial practices of each holiday.

Four in ten millennials now say they are religiously unaffiliated, according to the Pew Research Center. In fact, millennials (those between the ages of 23 and 38) are now almost as likely to say they have no religion as they are to identify as Christian.

10. They will do what feels right to them 

If any of the aforementioned are clues, the next generation of parenting will go with their gut and not abide by what books, society, the media, the government or advertisers tell them.

In fact, they will be the one dictating what these ancient institutions do!

The next era of parents will be more empowered.

The future is here and it’s going to be quite different!

 

Do These Postpartum Pilates Movements to Get You Back On Track

 

With the whole journey that comes with pregnancy and the long-awaited birth of your little one now behind you, it’s time to face the transition from pregnancy to postpartum recovery.



Postpartum recovery generally refers to the first three to six weeks that new moms go through after giving birth. During this period, moms go through a lot of changes.

While your body works on recovering from the stress of pregnancy, you’re also going through the motions of adjusting to motherhood.

Caught in the midst of caring for yourself and your newborn, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed and even fall into a depressed mood.

In fact, reports from New York Times reveal that 10 to 20 percent of moms with newborns suffer from serious postpartum depression.



Luckily, there are many things that can help mothers go through this postpartum period, with taking on a simple exercise regimen being one of them.

In an article on Parsley Health, Hollywood Pilates instructor Heather Dorak mentions the importance of starting “with something small,” saying that no matter what type of workout you do, you take those baby steps to get back on track.

This sentiment  also resonated in a past post, ‘Mental Health Check ins to Make During and After Pregnancy’, which mentions that slowly getting back into exercise through activities that allow you to rediscover how your body likes to move can be an effective tool in taking care of your physical and mental health after pregnancy.



Benefits of Pilates



Childbirth is a major procedure that will have a huge impact on your physique and requires the body to go beyond its limits. As such, it’s important for recovering moms to subscribe to activities that promote muscle strength without being too straining. This makes Pilates a good option, as explained by FFC, Pilates strengthens the inner and outer hips, which can help support the pelvis, which will have been stretched during pregnancy and then relaxed upon childbirth.

Moreover, certain Pilates movements are known to relieve lower back pain and pelvic floor discomfort by strengthening the abdominals, hips, and back. Harper’s Bazaar suggests that because Pilates is a highly immersive exercise that requires focus and concentration, it brings emotional and mental benefits by being a great ‘time-out’ from everyday stressors.

Postpartum Pilates Movements



To experience all the amazing benefits Pilates can bring during your postpartum recovery, try the following movements:



Knee dancing



This movement which concerns the abs, butt, and thighs, can be easily done by kneeling down on a mat with your knees hip-distance apart and your shoulders pulled back. While in this position, pull your abs in while simultaneously squeezing your butt then raise your arms in front of you to shoulder height. Then, lean back a little. Try to hold this position for 30 seconds and do it three times.



Powerhouse planks



Like any other plank, this movement works on your core, abs, butt, legs, arms, back, and, with a little modification, your pelvic floor as well. To do this, get down on all fours and lower yourself down to your elbows. Then, as you align your head to your spine, tilt your pelvis under slightly to protect your lower back while squeezing your thighs up together to form a V shape. Hold this position for 30 seconds and do three sets.



Attitude



This movement allows you to work on your butt, thighs, and calves. You can do this by standing in front of a counter-top and then, bending over and resting your forearms on the counter with your forehead lowered onto it. Then, walk your feet back until they are underneath your hips and stand with your heels together and your toes slightly apart. Tuck your pelvis under while squeezing your butt then lift your left leg behind you with your knees bent at 45 degrees. Do 3 sets of 16 repetitions for each leg.

Chanel Iman and Sterling Shepard Are Expecting Again {Irish Twins Alert}

It looks like model Chanel Iman is set to deliver the other half of Irish twins!

The IMG model confirmed to US Weekly that her family will grow by one addition when she and hubby New York Giants player Sterling Shepard welcome their second child next year, less than a year before welcoming their last child.

The UK Daily Mail published photos of Iman and her daughter with mom bearing a sizeable baby bump.

The couple only just celebrated the one-year birthday of their first child, daughter Cali Clay on August 12 with the most adorable birthday party!

Earlier, Shepard had stated he was anxious to learn what his baby boy would look like, but that his wife wanted to wait until fall 2019. Well here we are!

Congrats!!

Cali is going to be a big sister!

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My little girl is 1 ?? ?? ? @pattyothonphotography

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Allyson Felix Joins Criticism of Nike’s Treatment of Runners Who Choose Motherhood; Plus Serena Williams Responds

Add Olympic Gold Medalist Allyson Felix to the chorus of world class American runners endorsed by Nike to come forward to complain about the company’s treatment of women who become mothers.

Felix, who welcomed daughter Camryn last winter published her own Op/Ed in The New York Times that was inspired by and comes on the heels of pieces published by fellow moms Alysia Montaño and Kara Goucher in that newspaper.

“They told stories we athletes know are true, but have been too scared to tell publicly,” Felix wrote of Montaño and Goucher in her op-ed published last week, on May 22. “If we have children, we risk pay cuts from our sponsors during pregnancy and afterward.”

“Thank you @alysiamontano@karagoucher for starting such an important conversation. ‘As. you can’t change anything with silence.’ This is my story. #dreammaternity , “ she captioned an Instagram photo of herself running in between photos of men running a similar race.

She shared her own post-birth experience in the newspaper.

After severe pre-eclampsia that put her baby’s life at risk caused her to have to have giving birth and having to undergo an emergency C-section at 32, she alleged that Nike pressured her to return to training as soon as possible.

Then, the company wanted to pay her 70 percent less than before.

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??☀️

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Felix pushed back, and essentially demanded that the athletic apparel brand change its policies.

“If that’s what they think I’m worth now, I accept that,” she admitted. “What I’m not willing to accept is the enduring status quo around maternity. I asked Nike to contractually guarantee that I wouldn’t be punished if I didn’t perform at my best in the months surrounding childbirth. I wanted to set a new standard. If I, one of Nike’s most widely marketed athletes, couldn’t secure these protections, who could?”

Nike didn’t accept her demands.

“My disappointment is not just with Nike, but with how the sports apparel industry at large treats female athletes,” she explained in the op-ed. “This isn’t just about pregnancy. We may stand behind the brands we endorse, but we also need to hold them accountable when they are marketing us to appeal to the next generation of athletes and consumers.”

Right before Montano and Goucher came forward, according to an article in The Wall Street Journal, Nike announced iot would change its maternity policy.

Sports Illustrated reported the changes will include protection in its contracts, while brands such as Brooks, Altra and Nuun pledged to also guarantee contractual support of female athletes through pregnancy moving forward.

Now to wait to see what those changes are.

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my motivation is different now✨

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“I look forward to specifics, from Nike and the rest of the industry who has yet to commit to contractually protecting women,” Felix concluded.

Bravo!

Meanwhile, Nike athlete and star of its female empowerment campaign Serena Williams

“I understand that Nike has been really lately supporting women a lot, and it started with making a statement with me, and they said they want to make a change,” Williams said Monday after defeating Vitalia Diatchenko in the first round of the French Open. “They want to support women that want to have families and that want to be moms. I’m glad that statement was made, and I know that therefore and going forward, they’re doing better.”

Amy Schumer’s Naked Maternity Shoot is So Amy

Comedienne Amy Schumer had photographer Heather Sten shoot some maternity photos of herself for a New York Times profile and it is awesome!

Personally, I do not like the feature because I think that it is all over the place and is missing meat and potatoes I wanted the author to get from the funny woman.

Anyway, I am still happy to see her get a profile whilst preggers.

It has had a bit of a roller coaster of a pregnancy for Schumer who is expecting her and hubby Chris Fischer‘s first child. It has been marked by hospitalization for extreme morning sickness.

So the bookend to her 40 weeks is this totally unconventional shoot that features the I Feel Pretty star in the puff undressing as she frolicked in the rain running towards a gaggle of geese.

She captioned a series of photos of the spread:

On a chilly Nola morning it’s best to chase ducks with nothing weighing you down except a baby. Photo by @heathersten for the @nytimes on a rainy night it’s also a good idea. Thank you @zinomanjason for your profile on me. Brutally honest. My favorite kind of honesty. See you in another 10 when you write about me again. Article on nytimes.com

In another photo, the mom-to-be covers her bare breast with clumps of Spanish moss set to a forest backdrop. Deep!

Being naked was no big thing.

“As someone who has been told a million times they are fat and ugly, it does not matter!” the comedian, who’s expecting her first child with husband Chris Fischer, told the New York Times. And she’s very much looking forward to meeting her little one, saying, “I think I will experience [some other level of joy] with a baby.”

Love it!

Study: Celebrity Pregnancy Coverage Destigmatizes Out-Of-Wedlock Births Among White Women

A new study states that media coverage of celebrity pregnancies has destigmatized out-of-wedlock births especially among white, middle class women.

Analyzing PEOPLE magazine covers from 1974 to 2014 featuring celebrity pregnancy, researcher Hanna Grol-Prokopczyk, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Sociology took note of the magazine’s reference to the parents’ relationship status at the time of the pregnancy announcement and the time of the child’s birth.

In the study, published this month in the journal Demographic Research, Grol-Prokopczyk looked at how media presentations of celebrities’ childbearing influenced larger society.

Indeed, there has been a rise in out-of-wedlock births. Between 1940 and 2009, the number of U.S. births to unmarried women increased from about 4 percent to nearly 41 percent.

While existing scholarship suggests that economic and cultural factors have contributed to this growth, Grol-Prokopczyk wondered whether celebrities might have been the trigger for that 10-fold rise.

“No one has actually tested whether celebrities in fact engage in more out-of-wedlock childbearing than the general public,” she told Science Daily. “This is an important question to address because the power of celebrity culture to shape all kinds of decisions, including childbearing-related decisions, is often under-acknowledged.”

Grol-Prokopczyk concludes that celebrities might shape how we think about the nature of the family and the right environment in which to have children and used People magazine as a yardstick because it is a reliable source of data for exploring this issue. Also, it is heavily trafficked companion to its print edition with over 70 million unique monthly visitors.

The influence of celebrity news is undeniable. Consider that 74 percent of US adults became aware of Angelina Jolie‘s decision to have a preventative double mastectomy just weeks after her op-ed appeared in the New York Times in May of 2013.

The celebrity coverage has shifted attitudes particularly among white, middle class women who generally, have less out-of-wedlock births compared to women in other racial groups.

But unlike their regular folk counterpart, white celebrity women are more likely to have a baby while not married or engaged.

“If you compare celebrities to just white Americans — which could make sense given that until recently People magazine has disproportionally depicted white celebrity parents on its covers — you find that celebrities have the same rates of non-marital fertility,” she added.

Here is the link:

Grol-Prokopczyk also found that most celebrities featured on People magazine’s covers who got pregnant while unmarried did not marry before the child’s birth. Since the mid-2000s, many have declared themselves, “engaged.”

Instead of “shotgun weddings,” Grol-Prokopczyk sees this as modeling what she calls “shotgun engagements,” which if imitated in the general population could have contributed to a substantial rise of non-marital fertility in the U.S.

Interesting findings.

Singer and YouTuber Ameriie Is Expecting Her First Child

Award-winning Pop singer and YouTuber Ameriie and her Sony music executive husband of six years  are expecting their first child. The “One Thing” singer announced the news on her Instagram account yesterday, which also happened to be her 38th birthday.

The editor of the New York Times bestselling youth anthology “Because You Love to Hate Me” captioned a photo of herself cupping her belly, “?❤️? #BestBirthdayPresentEver#21weeks #blessed ??”

She and hubby Lenny “LG” Nicholson married in Anguilla in 2011 after dating for about a year  and posted a wedding anniversary photo last year:

Though the DC area native is known for hit songs like “Why Don’t We Fall In Love“, she has been in the spotlight as a Book, Beauty and Make Up YouTube star of late, hence her collection of writings about villains out now. Get it for $12.45 at Amazon.com! 

Congrats! And Happy Belated Birthday!!

Indian Supreme Court Denies Abortion to 10-year Old Rape Victim

The Supreme Court of India issued a ruling on Friday denying abortion access to a 10-year old pregnant rape victim.

The court determined that  girl, who is 28 – 32 weeks along, was raped by her uncle. A neighbor noticed the girl’s swollen belly and suggested that her mom get her examined, the New York Times reports.

India law prohibits abortion after the 20th week of pregnancy but lawyers for the girl cited a case where another 10-year-old rape victim who was 21 weeks’ pregnant was allowe to have an abortion. They also argued that abortion procedures are much safer today than when the law was enacted more than 40 years ago, eroding the rationale for the 20-week rule.

Still the court refused, said Alakh Alok Srivastava, the lawyer who petitioned the court to allow the procedure.

“Going by the advanced stage of pregnancy, the court has declined to allow the abortion,” Mr. Srivastava said.

In the petition, he said the girl was about 26 weeks’ pregnant in mid-July; some local news reports on the hearing on Friday said she might be as far as 32 weeks along, the New York Times article states.

Deepak Yadav, the deputy superintendent of police, said cops arrested the uncle in Chandigarh and charged him with rape.

Doctors as the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh examined the girl and determined that the fetus was “beyond that age” where an abortion would be possible.

 “At some stage of pregnancy, baby has earned the right to live,” Dr. Vanita Suri, the head of the institute’s obstetrics department, said.

The girl’s family told The Indian Express newspaper that the girl had not been to school for several months. Her father is a watchman and her mother is a maid.

This case is not too unusual, sadly.

Last year, a 10-year old girl in Brazil, raped by her stepfather, gave birth after complaining about a stomach ache in school. A 10-year old girl in Colombia gave birth in 2012. In 2015, an 11-year old gave birth after a court in Paraguay denied her an abortion after she too was raped and became pregnant at age 10.

Children’s History Book Editors Struggle On Framing the Trump Presidency

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Makers of children’s non-fiction history books are struggling to create editions for the current president because they are unsure how to include all the controversial statements and positions Mr. Trump has made and whether to include them at all.

“After an election cycle whose divisive effect on voters is still being felt, publishing books for classroom use has been unusually perilous,” New York Times journalist Katherine Rosman writes today. “For Ms. [Beth] Sutinis [executive editor for the children’s division of Time Inc], the difficulty went beyond the time crunch to finding concise quotations from Mr. Trump’s campaign appearances that didn’t include contentious remark.”

One book had to edit its initial entry in one passage about Trump, “Troubling Statements.”

It initially read “Some of Trump’s biggest supporters were white nationalists. Their comments and actions during and after the campaign were racist and often dangerous. Trump did little to speak against them.”

The finished book was changed to  “Campaign Statements.” The section about discrimination was modified to read, “Some of Trump’s critics felt he did not speak out against prejudicial people and groups strongly enough.”

New Birth Control Apps Help Women Skip Doctors; Teens Avoid Disapproving Parents

app

There are 40 million cases of unintended pregnancies in the U.S. each year yet access to birth control remains a very highly controversial political topic. And now there are at least 6 ventures or private companies  (including Planned Parenthood)that have released desktop or mobile apps that enable women to get birth control without a doctor’s prescription.

The apps only require users to answer questions about their health online or by video. All of the apps  prescribe birth control pills, and some prescribe patches, rings and morning-after pills. Some ship contraceptives directly to women’s doors.

The app makers only have to follow state telemedicine laws and are not tied by federal regs and ongoing political wrangling.

Some of the apps, like web-based Nurx and mobile app Lemonaid, accept insurance, including Medicaid for women with low incomes; some charge modest fees. Some send prescriptions to local pharmacies, where women can present their insurance information when picking up the contraceptives, the New York Times reports.

The apps are said to eliminate the time and cost for some women to go to the doctors.

The apps also enable teens to get around their family doctor and having their parents find out they are having sex. No more intimidating or embarrassing trips to the clinic when your mom thinks you’re going to the movies. Whoa!

While these are great for convenience for many women, we can easily see where some parents may oppose these apps. They really do cut the parent out of the equation. Even if a mom or dad has opened up a clear path of communication, a lot of teen girls simply will not feel comfortable going to a parent for birth control.

And there is the case of a 15-year old girl whose mom did approve but was turned down when the family doctor told them “oh you don’t need to be doing that.”

There are some great anecdotal interviews with women who benefit from these apps in a NYT piece that was released today. Check it out there.