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Jeneba Jalloh Ghatt

10 Spring and Easter Nail Design Ideas To Try

easter nails

Easter is around the corner and so is Spring. This is a time for those who dare to go bold and experiment with seasonal trends to take out their softer and pastel nail polish colors and try to match their mood to their nails.

Personally, I love experimenting with colors and adorning my fingernails and toe nails with lively hues. They do indeed lift my spirits while showing off a fun side of my personality.

hands showing off nail polish neon colors in ombre

My fave trend is the vertical ombre with a mix of rainbow colors as you can see in the image above.

Here are some great Easter nail trends that I spotted over on Pinterest and added them to my DIY Nail Boards which you can head on over to if you want to see them up close or check out any associated tutorials for recreating these ecclectic, on trend and beautiful polishes!

hands showing off nail polish robin eggs design

hands showing off nail polish pink and blue long
hands showing off nail polish pastel Easter colors and patterns
hands showing off nail polish swirly
hands showing off nail polish neon yellow

STUDY: Marijuana Use Reduces Chances of Getting Pregnant

woman rolling joint
person rolling marijuana cigarette
For women, using marijuana while trying to conceive was linked with a 40% reduced chance of getting pregnant during the study.

Women who use marijuana while they are trying to conceive may be less likely to get pregnant compared with those who don’t get high, a new study suggests.

The study researchers found that, among women trying to conceive, those who reported using marijuana or who had a positive urine test for the drug were 40% less likely to get pregnant during each monthly cycle, compared with those who didn’t use marijuana.

In addition, marijuana users had differences in levels of certain reproductive hormones, which could potentially affect their pregnancy chances.

“These results highlight potentially harmful associations between cannabis use and reproductive health outcomes,” the researchers, from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), wrote in their study, published Monday (Jan. 11) in the journal Human Reproduction.

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National Reading Month: 10 Ways Encourage Your Child to Read More

two children reading a book together on a bed

Today is National Read Across America Day and March is National Reading Month!

Normall, each year, National Read Across America Day  which is celebrated on March 2nd, the birthday of Dr. Seuss, focuses on the author.

This year, however, the organization is expanding their reach. The theme for 2021 is to create and celebrate a nation of diverse readers.

Bellyitch strives to focus on inclusvity in its coverage and in all areas and likewise, this year’s initiative fills me with glee.

I reached back in the archives to share thes 10 reading tips for getting your child to read more, even during difficult times such as the pandemic which is still ongoing this year.

LIbrarian holding a "we're open" sign

1. Visit the library

The library is a magical place for children! Help your child register for her own library card so that she can check out books independently. This independence will allow her to choose the books she’d like to read and help her become responsible for taking care of those treasures. Encourage her to look for books she is interested in, show her where to ask for help if she can’t find something and allow her to make her own choices.

Since the pandemic started, some libraries have reopened with mofified schedules with the requirement for patrons to wear mask and sit farther apart. Many provide masks and hand sanitizers at the entrance and various stations around the library. In lieu of shared headphones in the audio visual areas, there are single use ear buds. Many limit food and beverage and have altered their opening hours, curbside book pick ups and other accommodations for a safer experience.

father reading to child
Photo by Gabby K from Pexels

2. Read to and with your child daily

About 30 minutes of reading per day is what is recommended to encourage healthy reading habits in your child. Start at a young age by reading to your child and then gradually transition to him reading out loud to you.

The reading doesn’t have to be done all at once, but can be broken up into smaller, more manageable slices of time.

3. Role model at home

Children who see the adults around them engaging in reading are more likely to follow your example.

4. Write short notes to your child

Put them in lunch boxes, backpacks or leave them on the counter for your child to read.

You can write about anything; tell her that you love her, leave her a small fact to read or even write down her chores for her!

5. Ask open-ended questions about the story that you are reading

Asking your child open-ended questions will encourage him to think about what is going to happen next in the story and to put together what has already happened. Ask him how he’d have the story end or to predict what he thinks will happen next in the story.

Once you read more of the story, look back on your discussion and compare his thoughts to the actual story line.

6.  Add Context to check vocabulary words

Throughout your life you use context to check the meaning of words you don’t know, so encourage your child to do the same.

It’s an essential life skill.

7. Practice writing skills

Reading and writing go hand in hand because you learn one while you are learning the other!

Have your child practice sounding out words while she is writing, encourage her to create her own story with illustrations and have her write letters to people in your family (and have others write back to her!).

8. Let them pick the books that they read

Giving your child ownership of the books he chooses will mean that he is more involved in the reading process from the beginning.

Encourage him to read the classics as well, but let him pick out what he is interested in reading.

9. Make reading fun

While you are reading together have her act out stories, recreate them or illustrate them how she thinks it should be done!

10. Play reading related games

Choose games that require reading to play together. Games that involve word play (Scrabble or Boggle), games with cards that you read (Fluxx or Pictionary) or games that require you to read spaces (Life or Monopoly) all encourage children to read independently while playing.

It’s important to remain patient and calm during the learning to read process with a young child, help him when he needs help, but stand back and allow him to navigate the words on his own as much as possible.

Eventually the day will come that you are sitting side by side on the sofa, each reading your own books, and all that effort and hard work will pay off.

5 Tips For Coping With Anxiety While Pregnant

pregnant woman cradling her belly and holding her mobile phone

Recent research shows that many women undergo mental stress during pregnancy, likely triggered by the hormonal and other changes in their body during that delicate time they are carrying life.

If you are one of the millions of women who suffer from clinical anxiety, you may be wondering how best to navigate this diagnosis during your pregnancy journey in the most healthy way without jeopardizing the health of your unborn baby.

Dr. Alan Lindemann, an obstetrician and maternal mortality expert collected some of the most common questions asked by his patients over anxiety experienced during pregnancy:

Lindemann, who teaches women and their families how to create the outcomes they want for their own personal health and pregnancy, offered a disclaimer before dispensing the following five Q & A tips: “As with any pregnancy advice you read, I recommend you connect with your personal care providers to help support you through your unique pregnancy experience.”

1. Are many pregnant women bothered by anxiety? 

Anxiety is the most common psychiatric disorder, and women are twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with it. If you historically suffer from anxiety, you are likely to need strategies to deal with it and keep you and your baby happy and healthy during your pregnancy. Onset of new pathologic anxiety during pregnancy is not common, but communicate with your care provider if this is your experience so you can get additional support as needed. (Normal pregnancy related anxiety is common, and doesn’t need any treatment.)

2. Does anxiety carry risks to my pregnancy? 

Anxiety and other stresses in pregnancy are associated with miscarriage, preterm delivery, and delivery complications. If you are suffering from anxiety and become pregnant, it’s important to work with your care provider to create an action plan so you can optimize your pregnancy outcomes.

3. What are some natural (drug-free) ways to deal with anxiety during pregnancy? 

Enlist the help of your partner in creating and maintaining a calm pregnancy environment. You can also tryyoga, meditation, and walking. Be sure to talk to your obstetrician, as well. If s/he doesn’t feel comfortable helping you with your anxiety, ask for a referral to a counselor

4. Is it safe to take anxiety medications while pregnant? 

Taking anxiety medications during pregnancy does carry some risks to your baby (depending on the medication), including cleft lip and “floppy baby syndrome” (i.e., hypothermia, lethargy, poor respiratory effort, and feeding problems). Your infant may also suffer from withdrawal from certain medications. Be sure to consult with your prescribing physician and understand all the risks before making your decision.

5. What if I’m on anxiety medication when I get pregnant? 

Work with your prescribing physician to slowly decrease dosage over a period of about three weeks until you can wean yourself off. While some anxiety medications can be taken during pregnancy, they all cause some risk to your baby, and it is best to go off the medications if possible.

In the end, the decision needs to be weighed from the perspective of where the greatest benefit will be compared to the greatest harm. If not taking your medication could result in self-harm, for example, your physician may recommend you continue taking it in spite of the potential risks to your pregnancy.

Graphic featuring a woman looking down, holding her pregnant belly

Build a Minimialist Feng Shui Nursery with These Tips

woman in nursery holding her baby, sitting on her ottoman with a white crib near by with carpet

I hate clutter.

I am also a minimalist.

My motto is to keep everything in its place.

I’ve followed some Feng Shui techniques in the past, but to keep it simple, I used to just try my hardest to keep the children’s toys in their rooms or their basement playroom.

I keep all books, papers and office materials in my home office; all clothes in closets, hampers or laundry room etc.  And if an item finds its way out of place, I put it back where it belongs, promptly. I am a firm believer that clutter creates disorder and chaos and an settled mind.

Ohdeedoh did a great post years about Feng shuing your baby’s nursery that seemed helpful to me. Essentially, it took all the most sensible, practical advice

and enumerated into a simple checklist I loved!

Check out these awesome tips which I know to non-believers in the ancient Chinese principles and techniques may seem a bit odd or different, but those who have some some basic rudimentary studying of it will get it.

WATER PURIFIER COLLEGE DORM ESSENTIALS PACKING LIST

I recommend starting with Feng Shui: Reference to Go: 50 Ways to Create a Healthy and Harmonious Home and go from there.

Common-sense things you’re probably already doing:

:: Use natural materials whenever possible for bedding, curtains, flooring, rugs, furniture, and toys.

:: Keep drawers and closets organized and pruned of too-small and out-of-season clothing.

:: Have different sources of light in the nursery, some for daytime and others for evening and nighttime.

:: Limit the electrical appliances near the crib. This includes various monitors, air filters, vaporizers, fans, etc.

:: Open windows daily for good ventilation.

:: Influse scents from essential oils like chamomile, rose, vanilla or lavender.

Some more interesting tips you might also want to try:

:: Invest in a mattress made of natural organic materials.

Photo of a natural crib in a room with natural light

:: Choose a soft shade of green, blue, pink, orange or beige for the walls.

:: No reds, yellows, grays, or blacks.

:: Bed sheets should be soothing colors.

:: Bright red is a no-no.

:: Soft blue is recommended.

Hope these tips are helpful.

Celebrity Bump/New Baby Round Up: Kelly Rowland, Meghan Trainor, Pump Rules Stars Scheanna Shay, More

collage of pregnant celebs
collage of pregnant celebs

It’s been a minute since we dedicated a post to celebrity bumps and new baby arrivals.

Congrats are in order for singer Meaghan Trainer and her husband, who welcomed their first child.

The “All About the Bass” singer announced the birth on Valentine’s Day.

“This sweet baby boy’s due date was today on Valentine’s Day💝 We got to meet him Monday, Feb 8th! We are SO IN LOVE Thank you @darylsabara for the best Valentine’s gift ever! Welcome to the world Riley!” Trainor wrote.

Bravo TV star Scheanna Shay of Vanderpump Rules who is expecting her first child, a Rainbow baby, conceived after a loss posted photos of her babymoon trip in Hawaii on social.

The petite reality TV star announced in October that she was expecting her first child with her boyfriend after suffering a series of miscarriages.

The impending birth is part of a Vanderpump Rules baby boom.

Former castmember Stassi Schroeder and her husband Beau Clark welcomed a baby girl named Hartford Charlie Rose Clark on Thursday, Jan. 7.

Brittany Cartwright and husband Jax Taylor are also expecting their first child, a baby boy.

Meanwhile, fellow castmember Lala Kent is expecting a girl with her fiance with Hollywood exec Randall Emmett.

It’s another baby boy for Kelly Rowland and her husband Tim Witherspoon! The “K” singer’s family grew by one when baby boy Noah Jon was born last month, joining the couple’s older brother Titan.

“My happy. My happy place,” she captioned a photo of herself in bed cradling her newborn with his big brother gently touching his head.

Congrats All!

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Are Expecting Their 2nd Child, A Rainbow Baby

Meghan Markle holding son Archie with husband Prince Harry looking on
Getty images

There’s a baby on the way for Meghan Markle and Prince Harry.

The couple, who wed in May 2018, are expecting their second child together. The exciting news was announced on Sunday — Valentine’s Day — via the couple’s friend and photographer Misan Harriman. Harriman shared a sweet black and white photo of Meghan and Harry gazing lovingly at each other while lounging in a field of grass.

The sweet photo was taken via a remote photoshoot and was shot by Harriman using an iPad.

Meghan’s happy news comes after she revealed in November of last year that she suffered a miscarriage in July 2020. “Losing a child means carrying an almost unbearable grief, experienced by many but talked about by few,” Meghan wrote in an essay for The New York Times on Nov. 25.

The pregnancy announcement also comes as Meghan and Harry continue to adjust to life in the U.S. after officially stepping down from their roles as senior royals last year. The couple made the decision out of a desire to focus on their family. Meghan also recently won her privacy and copyright infringement case against Associated Newspapers last week.

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Black History Month: 100+ Books for School Aged Kids {And 10 in My Family Bookshelf}

Black History Month

It’s Black History Month and a lot of parents are looking for recommendations on what book to introduce to their family.

I searched the Internet and discovered a few awesome curated lists to share.

I would like you to check out the 55 elementary school level books curated by Life With Tanay because she broke down her list for age appropriateness. {Visit Her Blog}

Today Parent also curated a wonderful collection of 28 books which may overlap with Life With Tanay’s but is still worth the review. {Visit Today Parent}

Add the 15 books curated by Family Education {Visit Family Education}

I equally enjoyed reading through the collection of 10 books put together by Teacher Vision. {Visit Teacher Vision}

The website and blog Hide the Chocolate also assembled a list of 11 books to consider { Visit Hide the Chocolate }

Curiously, the books on these list do not include my own collection that I assembled for my brood of teens still living with me (my 18 year old is off to college).

While the last two books on this list are not part of Black history, per se, they are connected to my family as a Sierra Leonean native and given that a lot of black Americans have ancestral roots in Sierra Leone, I decided to add them here as well.

Shades of Black

By Sandra L. Pinkney

Recommended ages: 5 and up

I am Black / I am Unique / I am the creamy white frost in vanilla ice cream / and the milky smooth brown in a chocolate bar…Using simple poetic language and stunning photographs, Sandra and Myles Pinkney have created a remarkable book of affirmation for African-American children. Photographic portraits and striking descriptions of varied skin tones, hair texture, and eye color convey a strong sense of pride in a unique heritage. A joyous celebration of the rich diversity among African-Americans.

The Harlem Hellfighters

By Max Brooks

Recommended ages: 8 and up

n 1919, the 369th infantry regiment marched home triumphantly from World War I. They had spent more time in combat than any other American unit, never losing a foot of ground to the enemy, or a man to capture, and winning countless decorations. Though they returned as heroes, this African American unit faced tremendous discrimination, even from their own government. The Harlem Hellfighters, as the Germans called them, fought courageously on—and off—the battlefield to make Europe, and America, safe for democracy.  

In THE HARLEM HELLFIGHTERS, bestselling author Max Brooks and acclaimed illustrator Caanan White bring this history to life. From the enlistment lines in Harlem to the training camp at Spartanburg, South Carolina, to the trenches in France, they tell the heroic story of the 369th in an action-packed and powerful tale of honor and heart.

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All American Boys

By Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely

Recommended ages: 15 and up

There were witnesses: Quinn Collins—a varsity basketball player and Rashad’s classmate who has been raised by Paul since his own father died in Afghanistan—and a video camera. Soon the beating is all over the news and Paul is getting threatened with accusations of prejudice and racial brutality. Quinn refuses to believe that the man who has basically been his savior could possibly be guilty. But then Rashad is absent. And absent again. And again. And the basketball team—half of whom are Rashad’s best friends—start to take sides. As does the school. And the town. Simmering tensions threaten to explode as Rashad and Quinn are forced to face decisions and consequences they had never considered before.

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Shuri

By Nic Stone

Recommended ages: 9 and up

An original, upper-middle-grade series starring the break-out character from the Black Panther comics and films: T’Challa’s younger sister, Shuri! Crafted by New York Times bestselling author Nic Stone. Shuri is a skilled martial artist, a genius, and a master of science and technology. But, she’s also a teenager. And a princess. This story follows Shuri as she sets out on a quest to save her homeland of Wakanda.

For centuries, the Chieftain of Wakanda (the Black Panther) has gained his powers through the juices of the Heart-Shaped Herb. Much like Vibranium, the Heart-Shaped Herb is essential to the survival and prosperity of Wakanda. But something is wrong. The plants are dying. No matter what the people of Wakanda do, they can’t save them. And their supply is running short. It’s up to Shuri to travel from Wakanda in order to discover what is killing the Herb, and how she can save it, in the first volume of this all-new, original adventure.

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Shuri: Book 2

Rebound

By Kwame Alexander

Recommended ages: 10 and up

From the New York Times bestselling author Kwame Alexander comes Rebound, a dynamic novel in verse and companion to his Newbery Award-winner, The Crossover, illustrated with striking graphic novel panels.

Before Josh and Jordan Bell were streaking up and down the court, their father was learning his own moves. In this prequel to Newbery Medal winner The Crossover, Chuck Bell takes center stage, as readers get a glimpse of his childhood and how he became the jazz music worshiping, basketball star his sons look up to.   

A novel in verse with all the impact and rhythm readers have come to expect from Kwame Alexander, Rebound will go back in time to visit the childhood of Chuck “Da Man” Bell during one pivotal summer when young Charlie is sent to stay with his grandparents where he discovers basketball and learns more about his family’s past.  

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Reach for the Skai: How to Inspire, Empower, and Clapback

By Skai Jackson

Recommended ages: 10 and up

Actress and activist Skai Jackson is a star! Her rise to fame started on the popular Disney Channel shows Bunk’d and Jessie. Her cool sense of style led her to create her own fashion line. And her success has made her a major influencer, with millions of followers on Instagram, who isn’t afraid to stand up for what she believes in.

But being a teen celebrity isn’t always glamorous. For the first time, Skai discusses the negative experiences that sometimes come with living in the spotlight–the insecurities about her appearance, the challenges of separating her real personality from her TV roles, and the bullying she’s faced both personally and professionally. She knows firsthand the struggles tweens and teens face today, and she has found her calling as an antibullying activist, known as the queen of the classy clapback.

Skai is a positive force and a role model for inspiring change and embracing differences in others. Her story will encourage girls and boys alike to believe in themselves and to have the courage to reach for the sky and follow their dreams.

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March

By John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell

Recommended ages: 13 and up

Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper’s farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president.

Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole).

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.

Book One spans John Lewis’ youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall.

Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book “Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story.” Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

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And March: Book 2

Sunne’s Gift: How Sunne Overcame Bullying to Reclaim God’s Gift

By Ama Karikari Yawson

Recommended ages: 13 and up

Sunne is a magical being or “magbee”. God imbues Sunne with the power of the sun. Sunne’s straight-haired siblings, Earth, Watre, and Winde have unique powers of their own. When Sunne is teased and bullied by siblings because of Sunne’s natural, kinky, curly, “nappy” and spirally afro-textured hair, Sunne desperately tries to change. Join Sunne as Sunne learns that there is beauty and power in difference. Sunne’s Gift’s message of self-love and bullying prevention, coupled with its sci-fi imagery, make it hit with people of all ages. The book contains Forest Stewardship Council Certified Paper.

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And March: Book 2

20 Icons of Sierra Leone: Who Shaped History

By Akindele Decker  

Recommended ages: 13 and up

Our primary goal for the Sierra Leone Icon series is to increase awareness about people who helped shape the history of Sierra Leone and around the world. We have done our best to balance facts, the emotions and the illustrations to deliver a book that will inspire a wide range of young adults about Sierra Leone.

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And March: Book 2

Adama Loves Akara

By Vickie Remoe

Recommended ages: 9 and up

Jumpstart early reading success with this lovable storybook that celebrates African culture, and father-daughter relationships. Meet Adama and Adamu a Sierra Leonean daughter and father duo who enjoy playing, learning games, and eating their favorite snack. Adama loves Akara is part of an early reader series that celebrates African culture while helping children ages 3-5 learn short letter vowel sounds. Each page has simple short vowel a sounds to help children learn to read with ease and confidence.

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16 LAST MINUTE AT HOME FAMILY VALENTINE’S DAY ACTIVITIES

the word love in a shadow box



Today is Valentine’s Day and if you are scrambling for ideas to celebrated with your offspring(s) as well, here are 20  last-minute ideas of things you guys can do at home!

There are some great at-home activities in here you can do nonetheless, with a few resources scrubbed off the internet!  

1. Have an Indoor Picnic in the Living Room

2. Have a Movie Night. Stream movies both like, pop some popcorn and snuggle under the covers.

3. Make Pizza. Be your own Italian Chef.

4. Go for a Drive to the Country a little way from home and back. Use the time to talk and catch up.

5. Go out for Dinner. Get dressed up and have a fancy dinner delivered. Eat by candlelight

6. Go Roller Skating. Have some physical fitness and fun while skating to the hits and oldies outdoors if the weather is fitting, of course.

7. Make Soup for the Week. If you live in a climate experiencing winter, whip up several batches of different soups to eat and save for later. You can pick different recipes from online resources or your crock pot cook book

8. Make Desserts. Cakes, Brownies, Cookies and Decorating fun designs is guaranteed fun.

9. Paint. Roll up the Sleeves, Get out some paper or a canvase and some paint and get creative. Frame your masterpieces and hang them up in your home.

10. Craft. There are loads of crafting projects online. Taking the time to create some crafts is fun and functional if you make some thing that you can use later like an oven mit or a frame.

11. Write Short Stories. Get your creative juices flowing. Get out some paper and pen and write up some fun stories to share or use to enter into writing contests.

12. Have a Game Night. Haul out the Connect Four, Checkers and Monopoly board games and have fun.

13. Have a Dance Party. Put on the Music Video Channel or Crank up the Stereo and Dance in the Basement or in the living room.

14. Have a Karaoke Night. Find Videos with Lyrics on YouTube and set it up so you can have a performance.

15. Do Puzzles. Get out different puzzles, get on the floor and put together some pieces.

16. Tell Scary Stories. If you’re caught in the storm and without power still, it sucks but you can use that time under the dim lights to tell spooky ghost stories to pass time until the light comes back.  

Good Luck and have fun!

Activities to do with the family for Valentine's day that's at home

Peek Inside Mandy Moore’s Nursery {GET THE LOOK}

black and brown Pottery barn nursery
nursery

If I were having a baby, I would definitely decorate his or her room in black and brown as opposed to traditional colors for babies like pastel pink and powder blue.

I love the natural earthtones of the nursery that designer Sarah Sherman Samuel created for actress Mandy Moore who is expecting her first child in coming weeks, a baby boy, with husband and Dawes frontman Taylor Goldsmith.

Samuel shared glimpse of the nursery in her Instagram stories as captured by E!

It included a black and white custom wall mural, natural materials, oak, wood and tan furnishings and decorations and a canopy!

Moore re-posted the story on her own story.

It is absolutely gorgeous!

It inspired me to create a mood board. (like Babylist’s below)

If you are expecting and haven’t yet settled on a theme for your baby’s nursery, I invite you to consider emulating the look of Moore’s.

You can start with a crib. I love the Larkin LARKIN BLACK METAL CRIB by CRATE AND BARREL
Outfit it with a black and white print fitted sheet like Pottery Barn’s COCO ORGANIC CRIB FITTED SHEET

Hang framed artwork featuring a brown animal. I like the fox in this white framed watercolor sketch.
Add seating like AllModern.com’s Mellinger Rocking Chair
Invest in a top quality dresser like Carson Carrington’s Gammelstaden Mid-century 6-drawer Dresser 

Make sure you add throw pillows covered in prints like 18 inch Birth Throw Pillow Shell
Carpet can be an allergen trap so hardwood floors are best for nursery and a nice rug in the color scheme would add flare and insulation. The Alfresco ALF rug is perfect.
Accent it with a brown table lamp like the Poldina PRO Rechargeable LED Table Lamp by Ai Lati Lights